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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/03/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    The calling out of Spey for a small forgivable and relatively unimportant error seems excessive but the larger more important point is that FLO took away the comments section on their own website and despite promising multiple times in responses over a year and a-half time to inquiries (from myself and others) that they were going to restore the comments section, they have not. They are good with criticizing particular wrestling programs or coaches, Russia, the UWW, and others by name on FRL and other fora, but they make themselves literally immune to fair criticism and correction of their own factual errors. It is one of the reasons why what they do cannot be properly called journalism. They do a good job at promoting the sport, but a bad job at allowing feedback.
  2. 2 points
    Well, I have to admit that I did not think Joe would medal at these World's, I predicted on one of these other threads that he would top out at 5th place. But Joe trained hard, and put in a good summer of work, as well as going overseas and doing well there, and when Garrett got hurt, Joe was able to step right in. But I believe what helped Joe get over the hump was his gritty and hard nosed mentality. And now that he is a World Medal winner, I am sure that this will embolden and reinforce that attitude and mentality. Next year Joe will be sitting in the finals of Final X, awaiting the winner of the WTT, and I may be in the minority here, but I believe Joe with a full year of being our number one guy, will only improve, and will hang on to his spot.
  3. 2 points
    Katie

    Colleges a kid should wrestle at....

    Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Lehigh, Michigan, UNC, Northwestern, Penn, Princeton, Stanford, UVA Edit: Forgot Harvard
  4. 2 points
    I agree that competing in tough tournaments overseas is definitely beneficial to American wrestlers, but I also agree that Joe Colon's resume was still lacking in the type of wins that would have made him a favorite to medal going into the tournament. I will say that I did not realize that Cory Clark had beaten Dubov in Poland and that Colon had beaten Beliechuk in Ukraine, so after the brackets came out, Colon should have been given a good shot at medaling. the Iranian was a bit of a wild card but is still junior eligible. I thought Topal of Turkey would do better too. anyway, great tournament by Joe and an auspicious sign for Team USA given that Nahshon Garrett is right there with Joe.
  5. 1 point
    Date Competition Style Age Group Weight Class Country Rank 2018-10-20 World Championship Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 3. 2018-09-14 Alexander Medved Prizes Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 2. 2018-09-07 Waclaw Ziolkowski Memorial Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 3. 2018-05-03 Pan American Championship Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 1. 2018-04-07 World Cup Freestyle Seniors Team USA 1. 2018-02-23 International Ukrainian Tournament Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 3. 2017-11-01 Dave Schultz Memorial International Freestyle Seniors 61.0 USA 1.
  6. 1 point
    danoftw

    Clarion Open

    Thanks for results
  7. 1 point
    1032004

    Hey Spey - Suriano lost to non-Hawkeyes

    I’m sure Darian Cruz has gotten past the fact that he lost to Suriano in the semis last year. Lu_alum, apparently, has not
  8. 1 point
    pish6969

    Clarion Open

    Was that for third? Not home thanks for the updates Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. 1 point
    TBar1977

    Clarion Open

    Kent State had a dual last nite that Conel wrestled in.
  10. 1 point
    Nice to see others get consideration for a Title - since most will never get past Penn State as long as Cael is in charge. Somehow he has put it together. Interesting to see how long he can keep the guys on top.
  11. 1 point
    cjc007

    Hey Spey - Suriano lost to non-Hawkeyes

    Flo sucks. Stop following this bush league organization. Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
  12. 1 point
    jon

    Hey Spey - Suriano lost to non-Hawkeyes

    Nah nevermind.
  13. 1 point
    Obligatory xkcd: Seems like there are a bunch of better places to point out this pedantic correction, like..... oh I don't know... the comment section of the article itself, twitter of Spey or Flo, email etc. Just sayin
  14. 1 point
    2td3nf

    Worlds Should be in the USA

    Another poster or two brought this up and it was discussed after 2015 Worlds in Vegas. Any possibility of a 3 day event (Fri, Sat, Sun) for all 3 styles in different cities? For example Greco in Budapest, WFS in Tokyo and MFS in take your pick city. Try to have them in cities that would have good to great fan turnout? (Saying this all with no clue on the logistics involved by breaking up the 3 styles.)
  15. 1 point
    Not a Harvard fan?
  16. 1 point
    bnwtwg

    Worlds Should be in the USA

    You're right. I had Paris and Vegas mixed up
  17. 1 point
    The top of 61kg is strange: Garrett owns Mega, beat Graff this past year in a pretty close match, and has super high scoring matches vs. Colon that can go either way Colon pulls out close, low-scoring matches vs. Mega by countering Nico's shots, but got teched by Graff last year and hasn't beaten him since the first part of his senior year at UNI (I want to say Graff might have beaten him in free another time in 2015 or 2016, but not sure). Mega hasn't beaten any either of these two recently, but he did beat Graff twice, including teching him in their first of two meetings this year Then you have Gross, who hasn't beaten any of these top 4, but it would be no surprise if he jumped a level and beat any of them next year. So I wouldn't be surprised if any of those 5 win 61kg in 2019. The interesting question is what they all do in 2020. I think Mega can clearly go down to try 57kg. Graff has had success there too, but that was under the old weigh-in rules. I think the rest might try to do the same, but have bigger frames, so I'm worried they are caught between weights and don't really have a good Olympic year option.
  18. 1 point
    Housebuye

    Wrestle-Off Results

    You are probably thinking of the US Open. He placed 4th twice (seniors)
  19. 1 point
    Housebuye

    Wrestle-Off Results

    He placed top 8 at the WTT in 2015 Here is an article about it: https://www.flowrestling.org/articles/5046159-anthony-valencia-taking-olympic-redshirt
  20. 1 point
    It has been my experience that if your son first figures out: 1) what he wants to study 2) how far away he is willing to live from home 3) what type of campus environment he wants - large or small school, big city/small town/something in between, etc. the wrestling will take care of itself.
  21. 1 point
    jchapman

    Worlds Should be in the USA

    Okay, how about this: Chicago would draw this midwestern folkstyle fan.
  22. 1 point
    JasonBryant

    Worlds Should be in the USA

    Budapest had more people every session for two more days than Vegas did. Had a bigger venue and the last three days of Greco were loud, boisterous and constantly rocking. It's also much costlier for countries to come to the U.S. (flights alone are basically starting at 1K just to cross the pond), whereas flights in and around Europe are seriously cheap by comparison. Flight costs coming to the U.S. are problematic. Flights around Europe are cheap. Crossing (any) pond is not cheap. There's also the visa situation, which our government can be a little sticky about. It's not easy to travel here from abroad. Lots more hoops to jump through than people have to go to when going to Hungary. Each country has its own uniqueness regarding which countries you need a visa and which ones you don't. - I've needed visas for Uzbekistan, Russia and Brazil in advance, while I picked up visas upon arrival in Azerbaijan. We didn't get NCAA-type crowds in Vegas, but to be fair, Paris and Budapest weren't getting 18K either, but the dynamic fanbase having the event in Europe, as well as quick access to international dignitaries who can drop in for a day or two at a time vs. spending four days total to spend two days at an event is better for international reach and accessibility. Both those spots the last two years outdrew the destination city of Las Vegas, which has a pile of cheap flights in and out around the U.S. As far as wrestling goes, we need to look at it from a global perspective. In North and South America, the medalists are coming from the U.S., Canada and Cuba. It's not often a South American country wins a medal (it's happened, but it's rare). So we are basically a no-man's land when it comes to wrestling competition. It's us and Cuba in freestyle, us and Canada in the women and just Cuba in Greco. With women's freestyle and Greco, do we have enough American fans to want to have tickets for them too? Vegas crowds didn't seem to be as receptive to those styles. The support for the U.S. is great, but no way we pack a place for Greco like the Hungarians did (or pretty much any other country that's hosted outside of the U.S.). I'd love for it to be here, but we are also a reactive fanbase as American wrestling fans. International wrestling fans are more like soccer fans - they sing, chant, cheer, blow horns constantly. They don't sit back and wait for a score to cheer. We just aren't wired that way. American ticket prices are also higher than overseas. I think we run fantastic events here, but there is a big, big world out there who can do things just as good, if not better, than we can when it comes to events.
  23. 1 point
    Let's see how I feel when the LSD wears off...
  24. 1 point
    source: https://life.ru/t/главное/892760/kak_zakalialsia_tank_luchshii_v_mirie_boriets_sadulaiev This is a very nice article about Sadulaev with videos where his mother and father talk and his first coach: =============== The new Olympic champion in freestyle wrestling in his youth had to chose between sport and medicine. Abdulrashid Sadulayev, nicknamed "Russian tank", who took gold in men's freestyle wrestling, has not lost a single match since 2013. He was talked about as a prodigy in 2014, when at the Word Championships in Tashkent, he defeated the experienced Cuba's Reineris Salas, a participant in the Olympic Games in Beijing, three-time medalist of the World Championships. Then the Dagestan fighter confidently - like a tank - marched through Europe, where he won two golds. And last year, he rose to the first step of the podium in Las Vegas, becoming at 19 years old, a two-time world champion. In Rio, a 20-year-old boy from the Dagestani village of Tsurib, confirmed the status of the main world star of wrestling. Abdulrashid burst into the elite of wrestling full of courage thanks to the foundation that was laid for him in his childhood. Daily rise at 6am in the morning, with the first training session being even before school starts. At an angle of forty-five degrees, every day he ran a few kilometers up the mountain to take an icy shower under a growling waterfall, and then run down. Breakfast and school. Skipping the morning workout was not an option. His father Bulach and trainer Magomed Alikhanovich are closest friends, sharing a room in the medical institute's hostel when younger. After school - lunch, twenty-thirty minutes of rest and again training in the Tsurib wrestling hall. A few hours of continuous hard training under the guidance of the strict Alikhanovich. When exhausted, Sadulaev returned home where he had to do more work: carried water, cleaned the yard and chopped wood. The third and youngest son in the family according to the mountain tradition was not deprived of village work. Dinner. Twenty to thirty minutes of rest. Exactly at 9pm -- bed time. Sadulaev Sr. strictly controlled the regime, with medical scrupulousness. Not for nothing did he earn the reputation as the best therapist in and around Tsurib. Any deviation from the regime that his father set up, was noted immediately. At the table, his father hanged a sheet of paper with tasks that all three brothers had to perform during the day. If you did your job well, he put a checkmark. Once, Bulach Sadulayev was delayed by attending an event at a friend's house. It was already past midnight when he returned home, but he took a look at the checkmark sheet even when he returned home late. There were not enough checkmarks! Immediately he kicked all three brothers out of bed, and made them do all the necessary tasks and more. The middle brother tried to shield Abdulrashid from work as he was the smallest of the three, but the father was adamant and Abdulrashid was kicked out of bed like the others and put to work. Bulach Sadulaev did not have the goal that his son becomes a professional athlete. He actually wanted him to become a doctor, like himself. When Sadulaev was finishing school - by the time he had already won gold in the championships of Russia - Bulach gave him 1 week to reflect what he wants to do. Pick 1: serious sport or medicine. Despite the fact that wrestling training took a long time, Abdulrashid was an excellent student and had perfect marks in all subjects. Abdulrashid was a very good student and was often sent to competitions in mathematics and history, and his father used to complain to the teachers do not allow him to train as much as he needs to. To the delight of his first coach, Abdulrashid chose wrestling and not medicine. For him, this was a chance that a dream of his would come true: one of his students would make it to the Olympic Games. The future Olympian came to Magomed Magomedov (coach) in the second grade. Magomed was studying to become a doctor and somehow accidentally ended up as a freestyle wrestling coach. Medical practice did not work out, and Alikhanovich temporarily settled in the village gym. In his youth, he was fond of wrestling, and slowly started coaching the kids in the village, among whom was Sadulayev. Then, of course, no one suspected what kind of world sensation would be created by the self-taught village coach and the then-small Sadulaev. Abdulrashid won the district championship and appeared to shine in those competitions. In Dagestan they had seen a lot of wrestling matches, but this was something special. Its as if Sadulaev was born on the wrestling mat. Of course, there were bad moments. Especially due to Sadulaev's character (he was too nice). Sometimes with rivals with whom Abdulrashid was friends outside the competition, he did not engage 100%. He felt compassion for them and did not want to wrestle hard and embarrass anyone (in the video: his coach says Sadulaev is soft hearted and it was had to motivate him to wrestle hard sometimes). To address this, Alikhanovich had to slap Sadulaev few times before a match, so to make him angry: so that Sadulaev could understand that there are no friends or brothers on the mat - these are rivals. The coach even tried a psychological trick. He appointed Abdulrashid as a leader of the team. He thought that a responsible position for him would make the boy treat his peers more strictly. The trick didn't work. The only thing that remained was explaining to Sadualev that he had to go 100% in all matches, friends or not. There was a turning point in the career of the phenomenal wrestler: before his first Russian championship, Sadulayev twisted his ankle and didn’t get to the competition for which he had been preparing hard for several months. He could have stopped training then, but the injury only irritated him further: he started training harder and winning tournament after tournament. At first - juniors. And then - after a crushing success at the youth world championships, where, by the way, he was called the “Russian tank”, he began to wrestle in men's divisions. At 17. His first coach says that earlier Sadulaev did not have enough speed -- but now Sadulaev fixed that and wrestles like a lightweight. In his teenage year, Sadulaev moved to another coach -- he no longer had good training partners in his village. And without good partners in wrestling, you cannot go grow. The nature of the sport. Sadulaev had to move to Makhachkala, where he settled with his brother. World Championships and the Olympics would come later, but he still had lots of things to overcome. From Shamkhal-Termen - the village where his brother's house was located (this is a suburb of the Dagestan capital) - Sadulaev had to travel 1.5 hours to even reach the training hall. As a young teenager, Sadulayev traveled to training by public transport. Unfortunately, even if it was possible to get to the morning classes by bus, after the evening training, he had to find creative ways to get home. The buses stopped working around 9pm in the evening just when the wrestling session was over. Exhausted after wrestling training, Sadulaev had to take a special bus to the North point— this is what the exit from Makhachkala is called — and from there he had to either walk on foot or hitchhike to get home. An obligatory part of a family holiday is a trip to Gilib, a village located further in the mountains, from where his family originates. Sadulayev's grand father lives there, and he is, according to the stories of relatives, even more severe than his father Sadulaevl's father Bulach. Sadulaev's Olympic victories on the mat or the fact he is tired from training are not an excuse for the old man and after wrestling training, Abdulrashid has to plow in his grandfather's garden sometimes. The younger son in a Dagestan family is also a special kind of position. ===================
  25. 1 point
    This thread makes me so happy. Let’s go!
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