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Plasmodium

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Everything posted by Plasmodium

  1. It's not popular in Russia, Have you ever been there? It's about as popular there as rugby is in the US. Very much a niche sport with little following. Wrestling trounces MMA in popularity, while the reverse is true here in the us. The point is, your logic ignores sample size, one of the most important determinants of whether an argument has statistical value. Yours doesn't. Japan was good at wrestling a long time ago. It has since become a very average country with occasional flashes of its past brilliance (the globally dominant women's program, which generates a negligible amount of MMA talent, excepted). And what do you think the background of Japan's MMA stars often includes? A lot of them wrestled freestyle as part of their training, supporting the point that freestyle is a good base for MMA and might be as good as folkstyle. Again, I am not arguing against folkstyle being the best wrestling style for MMA. What I'm saying is that your comments are not proof that that's the case and are in some cases just not true. There's no statistically valid evidence to point to folkstyle being the dominant style. Not only is the folkstyle sample grossly overweight folkstyle wrestlers versus other styles, it is also the preferred style of the USA, where MMA has the widest opportunities for participation and the largest sample size of participants in the world. Moreover, for all the guys who did well in MMA, there are many more who failed. Some even had top 1% folkstyle pedigrees (e.g. Alan Fried, Cary Kolat, Royce Alger, etc.). So on a % basis, folkstyle may not even stack up favorably to other styles, I don't know. Just curious -- How popular is wrestling in the majority of the Russian population? It looks to me like most of them couldn't care less, but a relatively small minority of them live and breath it.
  2. It took a few seconds, but LOL Well done.
  3. Implement a 1 minute SV shot clock. Before the SV period, decide who is not on the clock by these criteria: 1) Fewest penalties 2) First offensive points 3) Fewest warnings 4) Fewest cautions 5) Coin flip
  4. Here is my guess: People stubbornly refuse to add 'Cael' to the spell checker of their phone. Since 'r' is next 'e', Cael becomes Carl.
  5. Nothing happened over night, but after 30 or 40 years half of the people that would have been on the rosters were minor leaguers because they just plain weren't good enough. Bob Gibson is much better than whoever he supplanted, for example. That story gets repeated literally thousands of times. That is obvious. In many cases, this was not a case of a guy being marginally better. Willie Mays, Hank AAron and many others that took their place in baseball's history. If they hadn't played, the numbers would be more or less the same but mean something entirely different. The numbers are not like track. I'll agree with you that PEDs have an effect on most every sport. I like cycling, but I doubt there has been a clean Tour De France in all of its history. Baseball has always had its dopers as well. The dope wasn't as good. Neither was the training, the coaches, the transportation, the nutrition, the medical care, the equipment, .............. and the talent pool of players.
  6. Submitted for your learned consideration. This sums it up nicely. Deceiving. The animated gif is of poor quality.
  7. I smell an upset at Nationals. Wrestled even for 6 minutes of the match? Big pucker factor in Happy Valley right now.
  8. I smell an upset at Nationals. Wrestled even for 6 minutes of the match? Big pucker factor in Happy Valley right now.
  9. I smell an upset at Nationals. Wrestled even for 6 minutes of the match? Big pucker factor in Happy Valley right now.
  10. One of the by-lines on the Turkish Wrestling Federation's web site: President Yerlikaya: "Olympic Gold Medal to the Taliban" :D I don't think it has anything to do with Afghanistan......
  11. Single Season Records 1. Batting Average: .426 - Nap Lajoie (1901) 2. Wins: 41 - Jack Chesbro (1904) 3. Triples: 36 - Chief Wilson (1912) 4. Extra-Base Hits: 119 - Babe Ruth (1921) 5. Runs: 177 - Babe Ruth (1921) 6. Total Bases: 457 - Babe Ruth (1921) 7. RBIs: 191 - Hack Wilson (1930) 8. Doubles: 67 - Earl Webb (1931) 9. Hitting Streak: 56 gms - Joe DiMaggio (1941) Career Records 1. Wins: 511 - Cy Young (retired 1911) 2. ERA: 1.82 - Ed Walsh (retired 1917) 3. Triples: 309 - Sam Crawford (retired 1917) 4. Doubles: 792 - Tris Speaker (retired 1928) 5. Batting Average: .366 - Ty Cobb (retired 1928) Long-standing Records that were broken 1. Hits (single season): 257 - George Sisler (1920) » Broken: Ichiro Suzuki (259) in 2004 (84 yrs) 2. Slugging Percentage (single season): .847 - Babe Ruth (1920) » Broken: Barry Bonds (.863) in 2001 (81 yrs) 3. Base on Balls (single season): 170 - Babe Ruth (1923) » Broken: Barry Bonds (177) in 2001 (78 yrs) 4. Career Runs: 2,246 - Ty Cobb (retired 1928) » Broken: R. Henderson (2,295) in 2001 (73 yrs) 5. Career Base on Balls: 2,062 - Babe Ruth (retired 1935) » Broken: R. Henderson (2,190) in 2001 (66 yrs) 6. On base percentage (single season): .553 - Ted Williams (1941) » Broken: Barry Bonds (.582) in 2002 (61 yrs) It would seem the recent development of designer PEDs is the single biggest difference/"improvement" of today's baseball players. (Not talking about Henderson. thats just Rickey being Rickey) That, and the fact there is a much larger population to draw from its likely to include a few more exceptional players being born. All the broken records listed were over an 8 game longer season, as was the 2001 mariners matching the 1906 Cubs 116 wins. PS: the fact I even mention the aprox 5% longer season demonstrates that even a modest change to the structure of a game influences how before and after are viewed. PEDs changed the game? Every long standing record you mention was broken by someone who would not have been allowed to play baseball 100 years ago!! I agree the biggest drawback to ML baseball was the color line, but baseball wasn't alone in that. Once crossed and the immediate high level impact it is not a stretch to assume had negro leaguers been in MLB there would some different names included in the top 50, 20, perhaps even #1. But it would still be from the early time. A lot will slowly, incrimentally replaced. Ichero edges Sissler by 2 hits about half a century after Jackie Robinson. There isn't a sudden, magical improvement to humans over the last couple decades, the last century, or in milenums aside from famine or natural catastrophe (which wouldn't be a change in humans. They would be obsticals to be overcome. Today, baseball is about 50-60 percent white. How about starters? Probably less. How about coaching? No doubt the studs are studs, but comparing numbers produced against second team caliber people and numbers produced against first team caliber people is definitively apples and oranges.
  12. Single Season Records 1. Batting Average: .426 - Nap Lajoie (1901) 2. Wins: 41 - Jack Chesbro (1904) 3. Triples: 36 - Chief Wilson (1912) 4. Extra-Base Hits: 119 - Babe Ruth (1921) 5. Runs: 177 - Babe Ruth (1921) 6. Total Bases: 457 - Babe Ruth (1921) 7. RBIs: 191 - Hack Wilson (1930) 8. Doubles: 67 - Earl Webb (1931) 9. Hitting Streak: 56 gms - Joe DiMaggio (1941) Career Records 1. Wins: 511 - Cy Young (retired 1911) 2. ERA: 1.82 - Ed Walsh (retired 1917) 3. Triples: 309 - Sam Crawford (retired 1917) 4. Doubles: 792 - Tris Speaker (retired 1928) 5. Batting Average: .366 - Ty Cobb (retired 1928) Long-standing Records that were broken 1. Hits (single season): 257 - George Sisler (1920) » Broken: Ichiro Suzuki (259) in 2004 (84 yrs) 2. Slugging Percentage (single season): .847 - Babe Ruth (1920) » Broken: Barry Bonds (.863) in 2001 (81 yrs) 3. Base on Balls (single season): 170 - Babe Ruth (1923) » Broken: Barry Bonds (177) in 2001 (78 yrs) 4. Career Runs: 2,246 - Ty Cobb (retired 1928) » Broken: R. Henderson (2,295) in 2001 (73 yrs) 5. Career Base on Balls: 2,062 - Babe Ruth (retired 1935) » Broken: R. Henderson (2,190) in 2001 (66 yrs) 6. On base percentage (single season): .553 - Ted Williams (1941) » Broken: Barry Bonds (.582) in 2002 (61 yrs) It would seem the recent development of designer PEDs is the single biggest difference/"improvement" of today's baseball players. (Not talking about Henderson. thats just Rickey being Rickey) That, and the fact there is a much larger population to draw from its likely to include a few more exceptional players being born. All the broken records listed were over an 8 game longer season, as was the 2001 mariners matching the 1906 Cubs 116 wins. PS: the fact I even mention the aprox 5% longer season demonstrates that even a modest change to the structure of a game influences how before and after are viewed. PEDs changed the game? Every long standing record you mention was broken by someone who would not have been allowed to play baseball 100 years ago!!
  13. A century later? A lot of water has passed under the bridge of baseball in the last century. Track might be a better example.
  14. I would be interested in anyone defending the old time wrestlers to explain this video. What do you want explained? That match looks like many of the matches that still happen today. Agreed. That match was wrestled exactly like a heavyweight match is wrestled today. I would like the stalling enforcement, or lack thereof, explained. That is why I posted the match. There is some talk about how strict it was back in the day, but this match indicates that stalling was not called as strictly 40 years ago as it is today. Of course, the ref enforcing stall rules disproportionately against the wrestler with more points spans generations.
  15. That is because there was 5X more stalling. What is more interesting is that Kemp was penalized more than Ward. I didn't know what to think of him standing out of harms way with his leg stuck out and arms over his head. I suppose he conceded the match before he wrestled in it.
  16. Where was the aggressive ref holding two closed fists triumphantly in the air? Isn't that the way they used to do it?
  17. Brock Lesnar -- and he is from a relatively small state that gives you thirteen tries.
  18. qlayer - That is not a super duck. Surely no one will hold this match up as a shining example of skill and excitement. There wasn't a single level change in this match. By either wrestler.
  19. 2-3 frames per second is absurd, but there is point to be made for video quality nonetheless. I think readily available video in general changed wrestling a lot. I don't know the reasons why there is so much difference, but look at the difference in matches between Gable/Kemp and Banach/Mann(posted by lewboo). Banach & Mann both look many levels better than Gable & Kemp. This difference is in just 8 years? And Gable is the one coaching Banach? What gives? The most striking difference in scoring to me is how many points went uncontested in older match ups. You just didn't see all that many long scrambles. This has to be related to position and defense, not superior technique. Kemp definitely was not more aggressive than contemporary wrestlers. He did not take risks and he did not get hounded for stalling.
  20. Was Taylor Walsh one of the finalists at this award ceremony?
  21. I wouldn't consider those guys to be from a different era. Their matches are in color. :D Watching lee Kemp beat Dan gable speaks volumes about the difference between the past and people's recollection of it.
  22. There is a long list of two timers. Making the top of this list is an exercise in distinguishing yourself. Burroughs did that in many ways. So did Smith. Both more than Taylor by a big margin.
  23. Grajales/Alton was an old school throwback match. Long on decent offense and short on defense and fundamentals.
  24. I drink Kopi Luwak every morning, but I'm not going to be caught dead with a pathetic, watch wearing loser. How gauche.
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