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The_Historian

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  1. At Princeton in 1981 a number of wrestlers did not make weight on the second day. They included seeded wrestlers Dave Allen of Iowa State (#3 at 177), Johnnie Selmon of Nebraska (#4 at 134) and Joe Atiyeh of LSU (#9 at 191).
  2. There is no question that the competitive environment in college wrestling was very different in the post WWII era. The Oklahoma colleges dominated the sport and won over 50% of the individual titles. In that era, Oklahoma high school wrestling was far better than any other state and the top wrestlers rarely left the state for college. Tulsa Central was the best program in the state and was coached by two Hall of Fame coaches, Art Griffith and Rex Perry.
  3. Oklahoma had seven of eight in 1942, including five from the same high school (Tulsa Central). The other champ that year was from Pennsylvania. Oklahoma had six in 1934 and 1941.
  4. In 1969, 8 of the 11 NCAA champs had perfect records. My records are by no means complete, but that is the season with the most undefeated, untied champs. As for what is on the website, my major health issues for the last 14 months have prevented me from doing major updates and enhancements.
  5. Knee injury, back in a few weeks before the EIWA tournament.
  6. How about 1982 with the Schultz brothers, the Banach brothers, the Scherr brothers, Nate Carr, Kenny Monday, Barry Davis, Andre Metzger, Bobby Weaver, and Bruce Baumgartner. They won an incredible number of Olympic (some at the '84 boycotted Olympics) and world medals.
  7. Double medalist Henry Wittenberg, who won gold in 1948 and silver in 1952, went to City College of New York. He was the old double medalists between 1908 and 1976.
  8. The Hall of Fame also has a copy, on DVD I think. I believe it is the ABC telecast, not an NCAA film, and thus edited.
  9. Auble and Uteake in the 1964 Olympics. Behm and Uetake did not meet in 1968, although they finished 1-2 at the weight. You could have Scott versus Gomez this year.
  10. The AWN publishes the play-by-play of every final with its post tournament issue. My copy from 1969 is not easily accessible, but I do have notes on the bout. Cornell was leading 4-3 in the third period, when he was thrown to his back and pinned.
  11. I do not think the old guides have the Army plebe tournament results. The AWNs often had them.
  12. The NCAA introduced Freshman eligibility during World War II since most of the male students were off fighting or working in the war effort. In the 1947 there were five freshman champs, although only two were straight from high school. In 1948 the rule was modified so that only wrestler who had been in the service were able to compete as freshmen. Freshmen eligibility was completely banned at large schools by the mid-50's. However, smaller schools continued to use freshmen until the early 60's. Both Gray Simons and Bucky Maughan wrestled as freshman. Simons was able to compete in the NCAAs his last three years, while Maughan was not allowed in the tournament as a senior. I am not sure why, but I think Lock Haven was just under the enrollment cut off and Moorehead just over. In January 1969 the NCAA immediately allowed freshmen eligibility for all D-I sports except football and basketball. ISU put freshman Carl Adams in its lineup and he became the first freshman AA of the new era. Some eastern schools were slow to follow and it was not until 1971 that the EIWA let them wrestle in its tournament. In 1969 Larry Owings was a freshman at Washington, but he did not wrestle in the duals or the PAC-10 tournament. This was pre qualification and Owings won two bouts at 130 at the NCAA tournament before losing 14-12 to Reed Lamphere of Minnesota in the quarters.
  13. Cornell was leading Chuck Jean of Iowa State in the third period of the 1969 finals, when he got reversed and pinned by Jean. That was the big breakout win in Jean's career, who was certainly one of the wildest wrestlers ever to step on the mat. Even Doc Nichols could not keep him in school for a full D-I career.
  14. Iowa Teachers had two wrestlers (Koll and Young) at the same weight class that were three-time undefeated NCAA champions from 1946 thru 1951. Nobody else has come close to that. Young also had the only victory over Cornell College's three timer Lowell Lange. In 1949 Young beat Lange 4-2, although Lange was up a weight class. Young had an excellent set of scrapbooks about his career which he kindly lent to me when I was working on my book. He had a very successful career as a collegiate official. RIP Keith as you join the other passed giants, Leeman, Koll, McCuskey, et al, of the great post WW II Teacher's squads.
  15. Thank you for your support. I was diagnosed with esphogeal cancer last November. I went through chemo and radiation last winter which caused me to miss the NCAA tournament. Ten days ago I had major surgery which included the removal of my lower esophagus and a lot of other work. I am still in the hospital and have been dealing with an infection. As I noted, it is very serious surgery, and the minimum stay is seven days. It has been very grueling physically. I woke up with nine different tubes in me. It has been an interesting experience and I have been very impressed with the quality of the medical care. Still by and large my recovery is going well and things should be back to normal by August 1st, well before the start of the wrestling season. I plan to be around for many more seasons and have some projects I want to do.
  16. I am not disagreeing that they wrestled, but it would have been at 136.5, not 114.5. As I noted, Sanders wrestled at that weight for awhile, but went down to 125.5 for the 1972 Olympics.
  17. Good story, but there is no way that Gene Davis was wrestling at 114 pounds. Sanders wrestled for a time at 136.5, after he could no longer make 114.5. Behm was at 125.5, so Rick tried 136.5 for awhile. He moved back down to 125.5 for the 1972 Olympics and won a silver medal.
  18. Yes that is Dick DiBattista. He was also the coach at Drexel. He was a real brute on the mat. That was the first NCAA tournament I attended.
  19. Stan Dziedzic told me an interesting story about Rick Sanders and his battles to make weight. He was from the Randy Lewis school of losing it all in the last few hours.In 1969, when Sanders, along with Fred Fozzard, became the first US world champions, he was having a tough time making 114.5. Larry Kristoff locked him in the sauna, using a screwdriver to jam the door shut. Kristoff forgot about Sanders and went to a movie.He finally remembered and Sanders was not amused. He had enough energy to chase after Kristoff with the screwdriver, but not enough to catch him.
  20. Rey is 90-11. One of his losses at the Midlands in the 2009-10 season was to a non-collegiate opponent, Aaron Anspach, and does not count in his NCAA record.
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