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Tofurky

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Everything posted by Tofurky

  1. I'm no Iowa fan, per se, but their fans travel exceptionally well and make the sport really fun at live events where the Hawks compete. The sport is fortunate to have them.
  2. I am circling back to this thread, and I admit I have not read it, but this observation makes me wonder if Cael had stayed at Iowa State, and kept pulling in guys like the David Taylors, Bo Nickals, from states NOT Pennsylvania, would there have been far more parity during those early PSU championship team runs and would we eventually be seeing Cael pulling the PA kids west to the flat lands of Iowa? Of course we will never know, but it has to have crossed some minds far greater than the clunker in this guy's skull.
  3. It is a great idea, but international students don't have it easy when applying to universities in the United States. The amount of paperwork, proving income and ability to pay for that education, plus visas, and having your transcripts analyzed (this isn't done by universities, but for-profit companies across the US) isn't anything close to any overnight process. None of this is to mention that colleges and universities in the U.S. cost money. For many of these really good kids, wrestling is an opportunity to make money at that age, if your talent level is there. Furthermore, for the really, really good guys coming from some of these top tier nations, they don't have use for a degree in finance or psychology from an U.S. university, because they'll have work lined up for them within the sport or some government gig, a la Fadzaev, Karelin, Jadidi, etc.
  4. I do not disagree, but remember, as late as the 2012 games, men's Free and GR had seven weights each, while women had only four weights being contested. While the sport didn't lose weights or medals, they were spread more evenly across the three "styles". Personally, I'd love to see every style have 10 weights, and two bronzes, if we must. Then again, I wish the NCAA, NAIA, and NJCAA would all adopt Free and GR. *shrug*
  5. No, I am not sure. I remember FILA/UWW/IOC originally did NOT do that in effort to not have every bracket be a mix of seeds featuring Russia, Azerbaijan, Iran, USA, and three, maybe four other wrestling "powers", such Japan, Cuba, Georgia or Turkey. No seeding gave medal opportunities to the Indias, Puerto Ricos, and a few other Latin American nations that historically had little to no success on the highest stage.
  6. Equity in weights between men and women, along with two bronze medals and no seeded brackets gives non-traditional power nations opportunities to grow the sport and keep the sport relevant across the globe. Not all of this happened at once, but the rationale is there.
  7. Tofurky

    Alex

    Great wrestler, but Zahid looked to be horsing Alex when he didn't need to. I don't mean that in a negative way. That's just Zahid's style and skill level.
  8. Start with a community college. Let me know if you need help with this by sending me a private message.
  9. Tofurky

    Alex

    Is 'ringer too small for this weight?
  10. Americans have been bouncing between coaches for decades. I can't blame Snyderman for wanting to have a taste of whatever it is that makes PSUs guys top contenders these days. That and the opportunity to work with the 2012 Olympic champ at his weight, why wouldn't you do it? I know he had the Turkish heavyweight at TOSU a year or two ago. It would be great to see more international talent coming over for exchanges like that. PSU seems to be able to raise the money to accomplish something like that, so why not? Bravo to KS for wanting to find ways to continually improve.
  11. It probably makes more sense to him to be a very large 86 kilos instead of a small 97 kilos. I support J'Den's choice either way.
  12. I really should not laugh at this...
  13. Without seeing the results until after reading this thread, I would have thought KS went 0-2, having lost to the likes of the third stringer from Burkina Faso and the newest entry from Antarctica.
  14. Thanks for sharing your opinions and perspectives, folks.
  15. https://www.flowrestling.org/articles/6218843-mike-duroe-1955-2018
  16. These are crazy! What is this guy's story and connection to wrestling?
  17. What does more Division 1 opportunity accomplish that can't be accomplished by schools in Division 2, Division 3, NAIA, NJCAA and NCWA? Is there enough Division 1 talent graduating from high school every year to necessitate this growth? The non-D1 levels WANT wrestling and are creating more opportunity annually than D1 schools have committed to in the last decade. Here is a list (data taken from Trackwrestling) showing how many colleges competed at the D1 Championships, how many scored one team point or less and how many scored zero team points or less. 2018 - 72 teams competed - 17 teams scored one team point or less (24% of the field) - 8 teams scored zero points or less (11%) 2017 - 69 teams competed - 13 teams scored one team point or less (19% of the field) - 4 teams scored zero points or less (6%) 2016 - 72 teams competed - 9 teams scored one team point or less (13% of the field) - 4 teams scored zero points or less (6%) 2015 - 69 teams competed - 12 teams scored one team point or less (17% of the field) - 3 teams scored zero points or less (4%) 2014 - 72 teams competed - 10 teams scored one team point or less (14% of the field) - 7 teams scored zero points or less (10%) 2013 - 72 teams competed - 13 teams scored one team point or less (18% of the field) - 7 teams scored zero points or less (10%) 2012 - 70 teams competed - 12 teams scored one team point or less (17% of the field) - 7 teams scored zero points or less (10%) This data might lead one to believe that there isn't enough talent coming out of high school to support the number of Division 1 programs that currently exist, let alone creating more of them that will only add to the numbers above. Instead of adding more teams to D1 at this point, why not focus on improving the numbers above first? Financially support the programs that need it most, which are usually among this group consistently, and will be most in danger of being cut in the future. All of this can do this WHILE growing the numbers of teams in college wrestling, just at levels outside of D1, where most wrestlers exist.
  18. Here are the numbers I have for college wrestling (culled from association websites and track wrestling regional entries) from 2017-18: Division 1: 76 Division 2: 58 Division 3: 104 NAIA: 56 NJCAA: 48 NCWA: 152 (34 Division 1; 118 Division 2 -I cannot find on their site what those designations mean) That is 494 collegiate wrestling opportunities for men alone. That's a lot of opportunity to not only find a college that is a right fit for student-athletes, but also to compete in the sport of wrestling after high school.
  19. If only life were as easy as your first paragraph. That said, Ray, your second paragraph isn't lost on me in direct relation to this topic. One thing you do not do is have more children.
  20. I did a few times in this thread alone. You, on the other hand, want to make it personal and have provided nothing in return but personal attacks. You're arguing from the heart, not the head. Groupthink is not only unproductive, but it is dangerous, boys.
  21. Let me get this straight, only D1 wrestling offers opportunities for young men who want to wrestle? That is one seriously specious argument. Quick question: how many collegiate men's wrestling programs existed in 2017-18?
  22. Lots of ad hominem attacks, but zero solutions. Anyone care to share how increasing the number of programs in the country in Division 1 helps wrestling?
  23. Both were go to techniques for Sammy... it all makes so much more sense now.
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