Jump to content

dsnc471

Members
  • Content Count

    567
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from cjc007 in Should the wrestling season start in January?   
    Pushing the season back probably wouldn't have much of an effect on fan interest or coverage.  As others have pointed out, we're not competing for basketball fans and we have no trouble selling out the NCAA tournament.  The largest positive effect of pushing the season back is simply that it makes the season much more enjoyable and manageable for the student-athletes.  The two semester nature of wrestling is brutal because it negatively affects academic performance in both semesters.  Final exams for fall semester are in December, right around the time when the season is picking up speed.  And then the heart of the season obviously effects 2nd semester heavily.  It's true that spring semester exams aren't directly affected by the season, but for many schools that get out in early May, there is only about a month of classes left right now until the reading period before exams begins.  Needless to say, wresting affects both semesters.  If the season was pushed back, it would directly impact spring semester exams, but the effect would be limited to that semester rather than covering the entire year.  I've heard arguments go either way on which is better, but I think most students would prefer a one semester sport.  Not to mention, avoiding cutting weight during Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays benefits everyone.  As much as guys like to wax nostalgic about their running in plastics on Christmas eve, nobody really likes that and it serves no positive purpose.   
  2. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from HoundedHawk in the "Stay-on-the-Mat-Rule"   
    Under current rules, whenever a guy takes a shot, even when in the center of the mat, I find myself wondering if he'll be able to score before going out of bounds.  It's like the edge of the mat is a giant magnet, and the wrestlers are wearing steel singlets.  Action always ends up on the edge, and the classic scene in which one wrestler is trying to drag the other back in, while the defensive wrestler is pretending to wrestle but is really just trying to get out, doesn't excite me.  At least the push out rule forces the wrestlers to do something on the edge other than just go out.  At lower levels of wrestling (high school and below), this is not necessary and could maybe lead to sloppy pushing sumo matches.  But this doesn't happen in freestyle, and there's no reason it would happen in college.  If a wrestler physically can't stay in bounds, then he's not ready for college wrestling.  What we see now in college wrestling is not an inability to stay in bounds, but rather a strategic decision to go out of bounds because the reward (no points) is greater than the penalty (theoretically stalling or fleeing, but often none).
  3. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Tofurky in Mark Schultz rant on Foxcatcher director   
    Maybe if you are a middle school or high school age boy.  Adult men realize that there are in fact far worse things that can happen to you in life than to be falsely called gay.  Obviously Mark is upset by the movie, but this is what happens when you sign away rights to a story for a major motion picture.  They do what they want with it in exchange for money.  Stephen King was (and still is) furious with the movie version of The Shining, even though it was highly acclaimed.  He felt it wasn't true to his novel.  Such is the way of Hollywood.
  4. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Coach_J in Mark Schultz rant on Foxcatcher director   
    Maybe if you are a middle school or high school age boy.  Adult men realize that there are in fact far worse things that can happen to you in life than to be falsely called gay.  Obviously Mark is upset by the movie, but this is what happens when you sign away rights to a story for a major motion picture.  They do what they want with it in exchange for money.  Stephen King was (and still is) furious with the movie version of The Shining, even though it was highly acclaimed.  He felt it wasn't true to his novel.  Such is the way of Hollywood.
  5. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from 2td3nf in Lalovic talks about changes to the World Championships   
    Somehow it's not surprising that FILA thinks these are good ideas, but it is sad.  They provide a classic case study in micro-managing to an extreme and actually causing more harm than good in the process.  No world championship every year?  What a horrible idea.  In many ways, the world championships is about the only thing we have to look forward to every year.  It's not like there are that many other high profile tournaments where teams send their A team.  Heck, Russia specializes in sending JV teams to events, and having world champs either not compete or look horribly out of shape, only to turn it around and show up at Worlds in peak condition.  If we didn't have a world championship every year, can you imagine how boring it would be?  If they are looking for an event to raise the prestige value of a title because it only occurs every few years or so......such an event already exists.  It is called the OLYMPICS.  
  6. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Tofurky in Wrestling Stiff / Developing Flow   
    I've found beginning wrestlers (and some older ones) have trouble learning to be relaxed, yet ready to react.  When you tell them to loosen up, some will go almost completely limp, and get snapped down and collapse like a soggy loaf of bread, or blown across the mat with a shot, and then when you ask them what the heck that was all about, they say "You told me to relax!"
     
    You can only learn by practicing.  But you can indeed learn to be very relaxed in your stance, yet ready to respond to anything your opponent does.  But when the situation arises, you absolutely need to be ready to forcefully react, whether it be a tie up, setup, shot, or defensive positioning.  The key is learning how to stay in good position while using as little unnecessary energy as possible.  The reason many kids gas out during matches is that they have spent all their energy in the first several minutes simply staying in their stance and moving around.  It's tiring to move around when you are constantly flexing all muscles.  
     
    Best advice if you want to loosen up while not getting overpowered is what has already been suggested above by others.....find a drill partner that has similar goals, and spend 20-30 minutes every practice "play wrestling", which means you aren't going live, but you aren't doing standard drilling either.  You tell your partner to respond realistically but not live, and basically you guys are wrestling around, but sort of letting each other hit things from realistic positions.  It should flow like a real match, so don't stop to trade off single legs or anything like that.....just wrestle.....but don't keep score.  Somewhat difficult to explain to new guys, so the key is to find a workout partner that is on the same page with you, and you guys can figure it out as you go along.
  7. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from GranbyTroll in the "Stay-on-the-Mat-Rule"   
    At least in freestyle, you know that if a wrestler is going to stall, he is going to have to stall in bounds.  And if you have to watch stalling, stalling in bounds is more entertaining than going out of bounds.  At least the clock continues to run, and boring matches will come to an end.  The total elapsed time on many college matches these days is 12+ minutes, which is crazy, and is excruciating to watch with constant restarts.
  8. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from 2td3nf in the "Stay-on-the-Mat-Rule"   
    At least in freestyle, you know that if a wrestler is going to stall, he is going to have to stall in bounds.  And if you have to watch stalling, stalling in bounds is more entertaining than going out of bounds.  At least the clock continues to run, and boring matches will come to an end.  The total elapsed time on many college matches these days is 12+ minutes, which is crazy, and is excruciating to watch with constant restarts.
  9. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Jaroslav Hasek in the "Stay-on-the-Mat-Rule"   
    At least in freestyle, you know that if a wrestler is going to stall, he is going to have to stall in bounds.  And if you have to watch stalling, stalling in bounds is more entertaining than going out of bounds.  At least the clock continues to run, and boring matches will come to an end.  The total elapsed time on many college matches these days is 12+ minutes, which is crazy, and is excruciating to watch with constant restarts.
  10. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from scribe in New rules are great though somehow don't benefit the US   
    Not too surprising though.  The real reason the US struggles is the obvious one: We don't specialize in freestyle wrestling until it is too late.  Kids spend more than a decade of their lives wrestling folkstyle and then when they are done with college they are way behind.  Under any rule set, there will still be huge differences going from folkstyle to freestyle.  All those years spent mat wrestling are completely wasted, and even from neutral the nature of exposure changes strategy and reactions significantly.  With the talented athlete pool that we have in the US, imagine if all kids from age 10 (or whenever they started) to age 22-23 (college grad) wrestled only freestyle.  Is there any doubt we'd be right up there at the top with Russia?  We would almost certainly be close to that good year in year out.  Instead, we get 23 year old college graduates that require 3-4 years to "adjust" to freestyle, and some can never make that adjustment.  And then they get burnt out or frustrated and retire when they should have been hitting their primes.  Cael never even learned freestyle wrestling until after he retired.  Imagine how good Cael would have been at freestyle at age 25 if he had been only wrestling that style his whole life.
  11. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from 2td3nf in New rules are great though somehow don't benefit the US   
    Not too surprising though.  The real reason the US struggles is the obvious one: We don't specialize in freestyle wrestling until it is too late.  Kids spend more than a decade of their lives wrestling folkstyle and then when they are done with college they are way behind.  Under any rule set, there will still be huge differences going from folkstyle to freestyle.  All those years spent mat wrestling are completely wasted, and even from neutral the nature of exposure changes strategy and reactions significantly.  With the talented athlete pool that we have in the US, imagine if all kids from age 10 (or whenever they started) to age 22-23 (college grad) wrestled only freestyle.  Is there any doubt we'd be right up there at the top with Russia?  We would almost certainly be close to that good year in year out.  Instead, we get 23 year old college graduates that require 3-4 years to "adjust" to freestyle, and some can never make that adjustment.  And then they get burnt out or frustrated and retire when they should have been hitting their primes.  Cael never even learned freestyle wrestling until after he retired.  Imagine how good Cael would have been at freestyle at age 25 if he had been only wrestling that style his whole life.
  12. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from 2td3nf in Got Doubles?   
    Great post and collections of analyses.  Before anyone accuses me of reading too much into a Burroughs loss when his leg was hurt, let me just say that this is all for fun, and the sky is not falling...Burroughs will be just fine.  But for the sake of discussion...
     
    There is much here with which to argue from both sides....ie Burroughs has a varied offense, as well as Burroughs is predictable (which is what the Russian coaches and athletes say).  As you point out, Burroughs has a number of finishes, and can fire off multiple shots in sequence to obtain a score.  So in that sense he is varied.  But on the other hand, most of his shots are initiated from a fairly simply strategy of fake, bang the head, and go.  He also has impeccable timing on his reshots.  The vast majority of his opponents simply lack the ability to stop these attacks.  Tsargush (and maybe some others, perhaps even Dake and Taylor in the future) has the right combination of athleticism and technique to hang with him, and here is where strategy comes into play.  Most guys are simply not good enough for any strategy to work, but Tsargush is.  Since most of Burroughs shots come from open and head clubs, Tsargush ties him up to take away that space (Burroughs seems oddly uncomfortable in a 2 on 1, like he doesn't know what to do).  As you show in your videos, Burroughs was able to score on Tsargush's retaliatory head clubs in the past, so now Tsargush doesn't club as carelessly.  And because Burroughs reshot is so good, Tsargush doesn't take sloppy shots if he can help it.  
     
    The issue is not that Burroughs offense isn't varied, but that his setups are very predictable, so by creating a strategy that takes away his setups, Tsargush is able to take away many of the shots.  What's fascinating to me is that this is the exact strategy that many of us on the boards, including myself, thought would be utilized back in 2011 by many wrestlers when Burroughs came onto the scene.  Even after Burroughs won the US Open in 2011, he looked very "green" and I thought there would be multiple wrestlers on the world stage that could tie him up, slow him down, and beat him.  We all know how that turned out.  It appeared that Burroughs was just such a freak that nobody had the required athleticism and technique to stop him.  But now, Tsargush is finally using the strategy that many thought would be used years ago.  And not just in this recent win.  In their 2012 match, Tsargush wrestled very well but appeared to gas out in the 3rd.  Despite similar scores from the 2011 match, the 2012 match felt a lot tighter.  Even the Russian coaches said Tsargush wrestled the right strategy but then abandoned the strategy in the 3rd period (maybe fatigue?).  And we saw how Dake adapted to his second match with Burroughs.  Some on the boards said that match was "not close", even though it was overtime (I'm not sure how that logic works).......because Burroughs was able to score quickly in overtime, but I think it's safe to say that match was close, and Dake is a great strategic wrestler.  So it will be interesting to see how Burroughs adjusts to this loss.  Does he keep the same exact strategy, which has obviously been working for him?  Or does he take a Russian approach and bring some surprises to the next World tournament?
     
    The other interesting thing from your screen grabs is that it's not very surprising that Tsargush thinks Burroughs is a dirty wrestler (hello pot, I'm kettle!)  In addition to the head butt from the 2011 match, Burroughs does slap the head a lot, both clubs to the back of the head and posting a hand in the face, which obviously annoys opponents, especially the Russians.  They have always viewed head slaps as poor technique, and of questionable legality (while obviously ignoring some of their own dubious tactics). 
  13. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from quanon in Got Doubles?   
    Great post and collections of analyses.  Before anyone accuses me of reading too much into a Burroughs loss when his leg was hurt, let me just say that this is all for fun, and the sky is not falling...Burroughs will be just fine.  But for the sake of discussion...
     
    There is much here with which to argue from both sides....ie Burroughs has a varied offense, as well as Burroughs is predictable (which is what the Russian coaches and athletes say).  As you point out, Burroughs has a number of finishes, and can fire off multiple shots in sequence to obtain a score.  So in that sense he is varied.  But on the other hand, most of his shots are initiated from a fairly simply strategy of fake, bang the head, and go.  He also has impeccable timing on his reshots.  The vast majority of his opponents simply lack the ability to stop these attacks.  Tsargush (and maybe some others, perhaps even Dake and Taylor in the future) has the right combination of athleticism and technique to hang with him, and here is where strategy comes into play.  Most guys are simply not good enough for any strategy to work, but Tsargush is.  Since most of Burroughs shots come from open and head clubs, Tsargush ties him up to take away that space (Burroughs seems oddly uncomfortable in a 2 on 1, like he doesn't know what to do).  As you show in your videos, Burroughs was able to score on Tsargush's retaliatory head clubs in the past, so now Tsargush doesn't club as carelessly.  And because Burroughs reshot is so good, Tsargush doesn't take sloppy shots if he can help it.  
     
    The issue is not that Burroughs offense isn't varied, but that his setups are very predictable, so by creating a strategy that takes away his setups, Tsargush is able to take away many of the shots.  What's fascinating to me is that this is the exact strategy that many of us on the boards, including myself, thought would be utilized back in 2011 by many wrestlers when Burroughs came onto the scene.  Even after Burroughs won the US Open in 2011, he looked very "green" and I thought there would be multiple wrestlers on the world stage that could tie him up, slow him down, and beat him.  We all know how that turned out.  It appeared that Burroughs was just such a freak that nobody had the required athleticism and technique to stop him.  But now, Tsargush is finally using the strategy that many thought would be used years ago.  And not just in this recent win.  In their 2012 match, Tsargush wrestled very well but appeared to gas out in the 3rd.  Despite similar scores from the 2011 match, the 2012 match felt a lot tighter.  Even the Russian coaches said Tsargush wrestled the right strategy but then abandoned the strategy in the 3rd period (maybe fatigue?).  And we saw how Dake adapted to his second match with Burroughs.  Some on the boards said that match was "not close", even though it was overtime (I'm not sure how that logic works).......because Burroughs was able to score quickly in overtime, but I think it's safe to say that match was close, and Dake is a great strategic wrestler.  So it will be interesting to see how Burroughs adjusts to this loss.  Does he keep the same exact strategy, which has obviously been working for him?  Or does he take a Russian approach and bring some surprises to the next World tournament?
     
    The other interesting thing from your screen grabs is that it's not very surprising that Tsargush thinks Burroughs is a dirty wrestler (hello pot, I'm kettle!)  In addition to the head butt from the 2011 match, Burroughs does slap the head a lot, both clubs to the back of the head and posting a hand in the face, which obviously annoys opponents, especially the Russians.  They have always viewed head slaps as poor technique, and of questionable legality (while obviously ignoring some of their own dubious tactics). 
  14. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from scribe in Jordan Burroughs   
    These discussions are always humorous.  Arm-chair diagnoses of knee injuries based on how "comfortable" a dude's squat looks from 50 meters away.  Ha!  Anyone who has sprained an MCL, which is what Burroughs said was injured, knows that the knee is actually fairly comfortable in every range of motion except when the foot is rotated outside the body (or the knee rotated inwards).  Forward and back is OK, and rotating the foot inwards is OK.  But no stability and intense pain in that one direction (foot out, knee in), which incidentally is the stability you need when driving off a back leg.  Also, if Burroughs wasn't injured very badly, then it would be idiotic to tape his leg like that and draw attention to it.  If you don't need the stability of tape, then it only serves as a marker for the opponent to attack, which is exactly what Tsargush did.  Burroughs was absolutely injured, but he also got his ass kicked by a larger margin than I would have expected, so I give credit to Tsargush for that.
  15. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Coach_J in Interview with Denis Tsargush   
    Tsargush is a sore winner vs Burroughs, but in general he's the classic example of the sore loser who only compliments guys that he can beat.  I doubt he would speak so highly of Goudarzi if he had not won every match against him.  He's quick to praise the technique and tactics of guys he beats, because it's a form of self flattery.  The implication is that "If my opponent is so skilled, I must be amazing".  You see it all over the sports world.  But plenty of guys tip their hat to their opponent when beaten.  Not Tsargush.  Although in the case of Burroughs, I'm not sure what his great excuse is.  If Burroughs has no technique but only strength and speed, what does that say about Tsargush?  His technique was not good enough in the other matches to counter Burroughs speed and strength?  As far as excuses go, that one isn't very good.  
  16. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from northeastwrestler in Brent Metcalf   
    There have to be more recent examples, but the first two that come to my mind are not recent......Arsen Fadzaev and John Smith.  Now you could argue that neither of these guys used the high crotch as their primary attack, but it figured prominently in both guys offense.  Fadzaev did his patented single change off to a dump or a double most often, but did score a lot with high crotch as well.  In all cases it was from his inside tie.  Very simple tie but the way he latched on to the arm was like a vise.  With John Smith, you actually could make the argument that the high crotch was his primary attack, and I think he did score more with it than any other shot, including the low single.  All his high crotches were from outside elbow control ties, and were very unique in the way he penetrated underneath with his hips.  Most guys won't be able to to it like that.  But the similarity with Fadzaev and Smith's high crotch, were that they never got muscled out of position on the finish.  Smith perfected the crack down position so well that it wasn't even dangerous for him anymore (like it is for most guys), but was actually an advantage.  Fadzaev was so strong he could finish anyway he liked.  The high crotch is such a risky shot to use as a go-to move, that if a wrestler really is going to commit to it on a world level, he better study some Smith and Fadzaev finishes and be darn sure it's his strongest finish.  And if he is getting muscled out of position on the finish or stuck in a crack down, and especially if getting exposed off his own shot, at some point one has to consider coming up with a better attack.  
  17. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from CoachWrestling in Brent Metcalf   
    The most disappointing thing about Metcalf's loss for me was that the mistakes that cost him the match are the exact same mistakes that he has been having for years.  Getting exposed off his own shot, and not having enough variety to his offense.  He has a nice high crotch as far as the initial shot goes, but his finish has been a weak point for years, and he's still getting exposed off that shot.  Then of course the ending was heartbreaking, as his defense wan't sharp enough, and he didn't have enough time to finish his shot.  But the exposure off his own shot is really a killer at this level.
  18. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from jstock in Some thoughts on the worlds   
    A typical Russian workout (if there is such a thing), involves something that might be considered "play wrestling".  It's not 100 percent live, and it's not structured drilling.  It's just playing around with positions, feeling through moves, and having fun while working on technique.  It really is a great way to train, but you need a workout partner that knows how to do this properly, because if it degenerates into a 100 percent live match like most kids do, you lose the benefit, but on the flip side if you simply let the opponent hit moves with little resistance then you likewise lose the benefit and it becomes no different than standard drilling.  The problem with standard drilling is simply that it is very boring, and also not realistic.  "OK guys, 5 single legs, each guy...then doubles, then Hi-C..."  How many times do you see that in practices?  Obviously you have to do some of that when you are first learning moves, but it's horribly boring.  Live wrestling is great, but because athletes are so competitive, they focus so much on "winning" the match in practice, that they are not actually practicing moves, which defeats the whole purpose of practice.  So what ends up happening in practice is that kids spend and hour drilling new moves in a cookie cutter fashion, and then when they wrestle live they don't try any of those moves but instead rely on things they know they can do to "win" in practice.  
  19. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from 2td3nf in Some thoughts on the worlds   
    A typical Russian workout (if there is such a thing), involves something that might be considered "play wrestling".  It's not 100 percent live, and it's not structured drilling.  It's just playing around with positions, feeling through moves, and having fun while working on technique.  It really is a great way to train, but you need a workout partner that knows how to do this properly, because if it degenerates into a 100 percent live match like most kids do, you lose the benefit, but on the flip side if you simply let the opponent hit moves with little resistance then you likewise lose the benefit and it becomes no different than standard drilling.  The problem with standard drilling is simply that it is very boring, and also not realistic.  "OK guys, 5 single legs, each guy...then doubles, then Hi-C..."  How many times do you see that in practices?  Obviously you have to do some of that when you are first learning moves, but it's horribly boring.  Live wrestling is great, but because athletes are so competitive, they focus so much on "winning" the match in practice, that they are not actually practicing moves, which defeats the whole purpose of practice.  So what ends up happening in practice is that kids spend and hour drilling new moves in a cookie cutter fashion, and then when they wrestle live they don't try any of those moves but instead rely on things they know they can do to "win" in practice.  
  20. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from headshuck in Some thoughts on the worlds   
    A typical Russian workout (if there is such a thing), involves something that might be considered "play wrestling".  It's not 100 percent live, and it's not structured drilling.  It's just playing around with positions, feeling through moves, and having fun while working on technique.  It really is a great way to train, but you need a workout partner that knows how to do this properly, because if it degenerates into a 100 percent live match like most kids do, you lose the benefit, but on the flip side if you simply let the opponent hit moves with little resistance then you likewise lose the benefit and it becomes no different than standard drilling.  The problem with standard drilling is simply that it is very boring, and also not realistic.  "OK guys, 5 single legs, each guy...then doubles, then Hi-C..."  How many times do you see that in practices?  Obviously you have to do some of that when you are first learning moves, but it's horribly boring.  Live wrestling is great, but because athletes are so competitive, they focus so much on "winning" the match in practice, that they are not actually practicing moves, which defeats the whole purpose of practice.  So what ends up happening in practice is that kids spend and hour drilling new moves in a cookie cutter fashion, and then when they wrestle live they don't try any of those moves but instead rely on things they know they can do to "win" in practice.  
  21. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from GranbyTroll in Some thoughts on the worlds   
    Very true.  And how often do you hear American coaches, especially at the high school level, tell kids that fireman's carries won't work against decent opponents, nor will whizzers, or any throw for that matter.  And then you see Russians hit them against quality opponents at the most elite levels.  There techniques have been around forever, they just get ignored by a lot of Americans who pass them off as "garbage moves".
  22. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Tofurky in Some thoughts on the worlds   
    Very true.  And how often do you hear American coaches, especially at the high school level, tell kids that fireman's carries won't work against decent opponents, nor will whizzers, or any throw for that matter.  And then you see Russians hit them against quality opponents at the most elite levels.  There techniques have been around forever, they just get ignored by a lot of Americans who pass them off as "garbage moves".
  23. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from Jaroslav Hasek in Jordan Burroughs   
    Tsargush is definitely a douche, and his behavior in this tournament and in the Burroughs match made the loss tough to take.  Unfortunately, being a douche is not incompatible with being a great athlete.  Michael Jordan was hated back in the day by opponents and all non-Bulls fans.  Why?  Because he was an arrogant douche.
     
    Just to play devil's advocate for Tsargush (speaking only of the Burroughs match because I didn't watch all of his) I didn't notice any singlet pulls (although maybe I missed them).  As for the lacing fingers....everybody was doing it, and Burroughs himself was doing it a lot as well and getting cautioned for it.  He also did torque on Burroughs leg, but it's a wrestling match, and is he supposed to take it easy on Burroughs left leg out of courtesy?  Did John Smith take it easy on Randy Lewis's knee during their Trials match back in 1988?  When you smell blood in the water you go in for the kill, as long as it's legal.  Regarding the head slaps and punches....I'm sure Tsargush would say he's retaliating for Burroughs head slaps.  The Russians have never appreciated the American style of quick snaps to the head, or in Burroughs case, the posted hand to the face as a setup.  Remember in London in 2012 during their match, Burroughs was actually repeatedly warned for the face slaps.  
     
    Tsargush is a douche, but he won the match fairly, and you have to on some level respect the competitive fire of a guy that has won 3 World titles in the last 6 years, and could have checked out after 2012 but came back and defeated a defending 3x Champ.  If Burroughs and Tsargush meet in Vegas next year, they will each step on the mat looking for title #4.  That makes it a pretty epic rivalry. 
  24. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from HuskyHero133 in Dziedzic describes recent rules changes   
    Watching this it's clear why Stan has risen to a high leadership position in FILA.  He is well spoken and articulate.  However, like with politicians, it's difficult to take what he says at face value.  In particular, he mentions that certain items were universally agreed upon, including the elimination of the ball grab, addition of cumulative scoring, and takedowns being worth more than push outs.  However, he vehemently defended the previous versions of each of these rules (on this very board no less) while they were in effect from 2005-2012.  I would say that the vast majority of wrestlers and coaches hated the best 2 of 3 periods and ball grabs, yet FILA (and by extension, Stan), had strong arguments as to why these (now old) rules were better at determining who the better wrestler was.  I'm glad the current rules eliminated many of these travesties, although I'm not sure why it took 8 years to reinvent the wheel.
  25. Like
    dsnc471 got a reaction from smittyfan in Dziedzic describes recent rules changes   
    Watching this it's clear why Stan has risen to a high leadership position in FILA.  He is well spoken and articulate.  However, like with politicians, it's difficult to take what he says at face value.  In particular, he mentions that certain items were universally agreed upon, including the elimination of the ball grab, addition of cumulative scoring, and takedowns being worth more than push outs.  However, he vehemently defended the previous versions of each of these rules (on this very board no less) while they were in effect from 2005-2012.  I would say that the vast majority of wrestlers and coaches hated the best 2 of 3 periods and ball grabs, yet FILA (and by extension, Stan), had strong arguments as to why these (now old) rules were better at determining who the better wrestler was.  I'm glad the current rules eliminated many of these travesties, although I'm not sure why it took 8 years to reinvent the wheel.
×
×
  • Create New...