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Coach_J

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Coach_J last won the day on June 8 2020

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About Coach_J

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  • Birthday 04/06/1962

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  1. Bo Nickal squeaks past PDIII, 13-3. This is bigger than the Cox weigh-in controversy....
  2. The problems with this bracket are blatantly obvious--it makes sense, it seems to carry out the objective of giving preference to those who have earned world level medals, and it is entirely too logical.
  3. I'll regret posting on this thread, but here goes. Whatever he actually said, Brands and DeSanto himself agreed it was inappropriate and deserving of punishment--should be end of story. He did something wrong and everyone who matters in the Iowa camp admitted it. What he actually said, that's open to conjecture at this point, but there's no denying it was seriously wrong. If he said he was going to kill someone, what the hell difference does it make if he didn't mean it literally? It's not appropriate. It's not acceptable of a decent person. It's a d-bag move. It's something a fifth grader would be punished for. Talk has been that AD is on the spectrum and, while I don't have clinical records verifying that, his behavior is reminiscent of the many students on the spectrum I've dealt with as a teacher over the years. The big word when AD left Drexel was that a harsh disciplinarian like Brands would straighten him and his behavior problems out, but year after year we see he's still the same guy he's always been (minus the flying kimura). If he is on the spectrum, he should be having weekly (if not more frequent) meetings with a counselor/therapist to work with him on his lack of control in certain situations. If he's not on the spectrum, he's got some major impulse control problems. Basically, his behavioral problems need more than a wrestling coach to address. Whatever he said, Brands has not defended him. Done deal--dude needs some help.
  4. MMA, 5 rounds at 5 minutes each. I'm part of the old generation that wrestled 9 minute bouts, 3 x 3, no tech fall. Very grueling (especially if you stink but you refuse to be pinned--yeah, I gutted out a couple of those!).
  5. I'm impressed he finished thrid.
  6. Coach_J

    D-II

    In college, I coached a young man named Ron Lucy. In high school, Ron qualified for the Ohio state meet one time and won a total of zero matches at that level. College, ended up beating the likes of NCAA Division I All-American Matt Suter (7th, Arizona State) and Big 10 3rd placer Will Knight (Ohio State). He was recruited by zero Division I schools (in fact, I think my lowly NAIA school was the only one that gave him a phone call); nobody had him on the radar for college success and there wasn't one D-I college that would invest any time or money into helping him develop his potential. It took a giant investment in time and mentoring in this young man to help him reach that level of achievement. I personally coached dozens of kids like this; so many more at other schools all across the country. The whole cheapshot "if you don't want to work hard go to Augsburg" is ignorant BS. May God bless the "lower" division wrestlers who do amazing things and work their tails off. Oh, and he is now an immensely successful business man and a leader in his community. Many ways to determine success. This "lower" division guy has shown what heart and the true gifts of wrestling are all about.
  7. Coach_J

    D-II

    Not sure about some of the comments on this thread. I've coached D-I, D-II, D-III, and NAIA. Trust me, the kids at the "lower" levels work extremely hard but it's a different process of talent development. My lower division teams were 11-8 against D-I teams, lost to the likes of Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio State, and Michigan State, beat the likes of Northern Illinois, Illinois State, and Kent State (this was the year they were MAC runners-up, a very solid team). We were tremendously outresourced by the D-I teams in terms of scholarship, facilities, travel and equipment budget, etc., so to compare the two is senseless, especially if it is to demean the effort levels put in by the guys who aren't D-I. At the lower level, we rarely had a state champ on the roster, mostly guys who were 3rd or 5th or just state qualifiers; the growth and development process was much longer for those kids than having a 3 or 4-time state champ who's been to Fargo multiple times and all across the country competing come in with all the fundamentals fully intact. Many of the kids we got had very little coaching in high school and only a few training partners to push them--they hadn't even come close to meeting their potential. Yes, the lower division kids worked just as hard and put in the same hours--it just took longer to master technique, tactics, and strategy. And consider this, my first year we went to nationals, none of the national qualifiers had ever been on an airplane before. The great Tom Jarmon, who coached at both Northwestern and Manchester (D-I and D-III) summed it up best: when he handed out work-out t-shirts at the D-III school at the beginning of the year, the most asked question was: "Do we get to keep these?"
  8. Coach_J

    D-II

    Yes, exactly what happened at 157. I needed draws like that back when I was competing!
  9. Coach_J

    D-II

    I don't think the D-II or D-III meets this year are representative of their norms in quality or competitiveness. D-III this year is basically an open meet while, as mentioned above, D-II cut the qualifiers drastically (short-sighted in my opinion, as it leads to the double-bye All-American, but at least they're having a championship). No need to rehash the old days when D-II, D-III, and NAIA guys could wrestle in the D-I and many acquitted themselves quite well. The world is wide--room enough for everyone in the sport.
  10. Coach_J

    D-II

    Entertaining tournament thus far, but man, the number of byes in a 16-man bracket in some weights is shocking. At 157, a kid has enough byes to All-American without winning a match. Covid no doubt the culprit and just glad they have an official tournament taking place.
  11. Tough making 57 kilos--get hungry at the weirdest, uncontrollable times.
  12. In the mid-70s to mid-80s, the Swedes had some real warriors in greco. Cruise through the opening sportscaster and get to Malmquist, Skiold, and Lundell. Great, exciting classic greco, not just pushing and shoving and grabbing hands. Was able to train there in 1980-81, given my flying lessons in many competitions (still wince when I see a grand amplitude throw). Enjoy! https://www.facebook.com/roger.andersson.9210256/videos/235961108083445
  13. C'mon, brutha, being facetious.
  14. I'm just glad Quincey Monday made Team Kenny Monday.
  15. Not at all. Look at soccer. The US put a ton of money into the men's program when we hosted the World Cup back in the day and tried to manufacture role models out of a team that, in essence, was entirely mediocre (anyone remember Alexi Lalas?). Who did people actually want to watch? The women (who, by the way, are actually excellent and, unlike the men, have actually earned international results). Who still gets more money and promotional support even though they essentially suck? The example of the WNBA proves that you can't force something down people's throats; they skipped the steps of building a grassroots foundation and tried to skip "go" and failed. Little girls are playing soccer like none other and it is in part to the patient approach of the the soccer community. Put it this way: would you rather watch women's beach volleyball or men's? Wouldn't take a marketing genius to answer that one. And their international federation gives men and women equal prize money (the women are basically subsidizing the men at this point). The idea that the "market" always determines what is best is a fantasy. Back in the day, you could buy records by Pat Boone and not find a single one by Little Richard--you really want to argue that the "market" allowed an talent-deprived copycat like Pat Boone to dwarf the sales of a genius like Little Richard, whose music Boone ripped off with impunity? So many more elements come into play than just the self-fulfilling prophecy of the "market."
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