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JHRoseWrestling

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JHRoseWrestling last won the day on April 19 2018

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  1. Your last paragraph is way off base. This was not a USAW issue. Sometime between the 2000 and 2004 Olympics the international federation (FILA, now UWW) mandated high cut singlets. I am sure this was a combination of an effort to improve presentation (just look up the Karelin/Gardner 2000 Gold Medal final and you will see Karelin's undershorts are exposed for the duration of the match) and increase scoring (there is absolutely a competitive advantage to a low cut singlet which makes gut wrenches easier to defend when applied to exposed skin versus fabric). We just followed these guidelines domestically, and rightfully so.
  2. The way I read this quote: The author was a good freestyle "mat wrestler", presumably adept at gut wrenches, leg laces, par Terre defense, etc. He is expressing frustration that these skills don't translate well to American folkstyle, thus limiting his effectiveness as a coach.
  3. Comparing medal count per capita is a very poor metric, especially to cast doubt about doping. Simply put, less populated countries have more access to medals per capita than those with higher populations. To put it in wrestling terms, the roughly 327M Americans have access to exactly 18 medals at the start of the qualification process. Likewise the 9M British citizens have the same access. If the entire Olympic games were an open championships, with the entire depth of the U.S. Program included, such disproportionate representation would be more telling.
  4. Two things jump out... 10 champions from 10 schools none of which are Iowa or PSU. Interesting top-end parity. Maybe the biggest outlier from a program standpoint at the time was probably NC State. (More so than NW, MSU, or Mizzou, at the time) It doesn't feel nearly as out of place to have NCSU represented among the champions today as it did in 2009.
  5. Given the window of notice, who would expect Frank or JO to be within striking distance of weight. This is not a surprise.
  6. Any rumblings out of DPRK? I wouldn't be surprised one bit if they show up with a never-before-heard-of 57Kg who medals or qualities the weight top 6.
  7. The recognized silver medalist, Makhov, earned bronze in London. He was promoted go silver when Modzanashvilli tested positive after the event, but prior to Taymazov testing positive.
  8. How quickly we forget... Cox was the true dark horse in 2016. Came in seeded 9th. Beat Foster, mowed down 1 seed Herbert, beat Gavin, took 2\3 off Dake. All before ever participating in an international event. If memory serves, Cox had to get his passport expedited so he could head to Mongolia to qualify the weight. His most significant freestyle experience prior was Fargo. The early 2016 Cox would be considered a less experienced freestyler than the 2020 Lewis. Obviously he didn't have to unseat a world champion as the upper weight hopefuls will have to... But J'Den demonstrates good reason to not limit the dark horse discussion to the lighter weights. His consistency since the 2016 trials makes it easy to misremember how shocking his emergence truly was.
  9. The same could be said for football and it's pretty popular.
  10. It looks like we've both wrestled and done BJJ at relatively high levels, and have a drastic difference of opinion on whether the tax on the body is comparable between the two. You sound like one tough hombre. I don't think most adult bodies will hold up to recreational wrestling training, at least not to the point where the fitness and enjoyment benefits aren't outweighed by the discomfort of minor injury and soreness... which is why many wrestlers transition to BJJ in their later years. Not because of a lack of wrestling opportunity, but because they find BJJ more physically sustainable. I understand that there will be outliers and exceptions to this, and you are probably one of those.
  11. BJJ is a bad comparison. Wrestling is so much more physically taxing it is beyond comparison. i would say the gap is more extreme than observing middle aged men playing pick up basketball and becoming upset at the lack of masters level tackle football opportunities. For all of the issues with our sport, I just don't believe keeping our athletes competing on a recreational level after the passing of their prime is one of them. We would be much better served to strategize retaining these former wrestlers as fans, referees, or contributors in some way. You are lucky, in the twilight of your career, to still have the physical latitude and enthusiasm to continue training. I am sure a local high school or club program would welcome your knowledge and skills as a training partner. Plus you could kill two birds with one stone using this opportunity to both help kids and condition yourself for Veterans level competition, which is not as rare as dedicated veterans level training opportunities. Best of luck.
  12. One of the best ways for a righty to demonstrate to a lefty: Face the athlete as if you were his opponent. Allow a little more space, especially when demonstrating a penetration. Execute the technique and have the athlete mimic your movement as if he were looking in a mirror. Just a tip.
  13. This stat will be biased STRONGLY in favor of the wrestler who scored the first T2. The reason being, in a match where one wrestler is appreciably better than the other, he will almost always get the first takedown, and ultimately win. Would you consider modifying your question? Possibly what % of matches decided by 3 or less points are won by the the the athlete who scores the first takedown? Or five points or less or whatever you consider a close match. If seeding were more reliable I would say we could use that as an indicator-- something like in bouts between athletes seeded within 5 places of each other... But we all know this year's seeding was not necessarily an accurate representation of the demonstrated ability of the athletes in question. I am not being critical, I like where your head is at. I am just wondering what the best way to measure might be.
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