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maligned

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maligned last won the day on September 15

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  1. Nitpicking, but I just read a couple days ago he gets no salary. His income is all book sales. Point made, nonetheless.
  2. I dont mean to say that you're closed minded if you want to express your patriotism by feeling like you'd only want to represent the US. I mean I believe it's closed minded to think someone is a less patriotic citizen if they compete while representing a nation of their blood roots. I think both stances can come from equally patriotic people.
  3. I agree...when push comes to shove, most everyone knows something of their roots nowadays--even if it's 6 or 7 generations back--and who wouldn't represent those Italian or Nigerian or British or Mexican roots if the opportunity was there and you were down the pecking order in the U.S.? The idea that it makes you less patriotic is very closed-minded in my opinion.
  4. I tried to say in another thread that he was in just as bad of shape at worlds as he was when Yianni taxed him into eventual submission. He just didn't face a match at worlds with so many scrambles in a row and no injury fakes left to take. Of course his very impressive explosions are taxing, but so are everyone else's (are his attacks more explosive than Rashidov's or JB's?). You've got to figure out a way to mix in some better metabolic conditioning and get that anabolic threshold higher if you're serious about medaling. I see no way he's a threat for gold if he's in that bad of shape again at the Olympics. There are just too many things that can go wrong when you need 4 good results in a row.
  5. So did Dolly. He wrestled for Ireland. That's why I thought your story was about him. He actually wrestled worlds 3 times, finishing 9th as his highest. He also took 5th at Euros once--all for Ireland.
  6. Dolly was a beast! That front headlock wrecked some good guys.
  7. Maybe so, but Micic is the one that makes the most sense to me in terms of wrestling for another nation. He's the son of Serbian immigrants, so he almost certainly identifies strongly with the culture. I have 2 daughters that have spent all but the infancy of their 8 years in France, but they themselves feel much more American than French still at this age. By high school, it will be a mix, but they would both die to represent U.S. women in gymnastics or soccer even though all they know is France and their French friends and sports clubs. For a guy like Micic that grows up straddling the two cultures, I'm sure it's an easy leap to represent his parents' nation, get to be the automatic rep at all big events, and never have to worry about any qualification process.
  8. Michigan "thing": Micic, Abounader, 2 Amines wrestling for nations of their grandparents or parents...Myles Amine and Micic qualified for the Olympics for other nations
  9. Usually win/loss percentage is more predictive of team performance down the road than the "luck of the draw" UWW scoring system. You can rack up UWW points with easy draws that get you those "filler" 5th and 7th place positions where you actually went 1-2 or 2-2--losing all your matches against decent opponents. Winning percentage exposes those mediocre performances. Comparing Kazakhstan to the US and others this year in terms of the more predictive statistic (winning percentage): 2. Kazakhstan: 25-15 (60%) 3. United States: 22-9 (71%) 4. Iran: 20-9 (69%) 5. Georgia: 18-10 (64%) 6. India: 18-10 (64%) 7. Azerbaijan: 16-11 (59%) (Russia won 89% at 41-5 by the way, but they deserve their own category this year.)
  10. People have suggested in other threads that 86kg is weak. I have a hard time wrapping my head around it, honestly; but my conclusion is that it's not nearly as weak as people think. Here's why: 1. Though bigger than average, 86kg is a very "normal" size to have good athletes to choose from in many different nations--as evidenced by the fact that it tied with 65kg for having the most entrants of any weight. 2. There were 9 ex-medalists at 86kg--2 more than the much-revered 65kg crop and not including 2019 junior world champ Punia, Naifonov of Russia, Gostiyev of Azerbaijan, Torreblanca of Cuba, the US rep Downey, and long-time giant killer Ceballos of Venezuela. That's 15 deep AT LEAST having credentials that would mark them as genuine medal possibilities at any weight. 3. We're too caught up in the nation on the uniform. We think it's "weak" because Spain or Germany or Slovakia have a chance. Those are real guys with real credentials against top guys from around the world. They are not the typical western European reps. 4. We're underselling Myles Amine. How many times does a top 2 or 3 guy nationally from our NCAA system have to step in and be an immediate medal contender before we accept that the right guys with the right background can have real success with very little lag time? His semi's appearance is being cited as a sign 86 was weak--except that he crushed 2 medalists and beat medal favorite Torreblanca to get there. 5. MOST IMPORTANTLY: There were a LOT of mild upsets that stacked on top of each other that left us with a strange quarterfinals and semifinals. Friev upsets the clear top-bracket favorite Erdin. Reichmuth upsets Friev in the match of his life--and suddenly the door is open for Punia to step into the finals not having faced a top opponent. Dudarov takes out Makoev and Downey while Amine upsets 3 guys in a row and we get a weird San Marino-Germany quarterfinal. Aminishvili and Gostiyev fell early. All the name guys and name nations fell early except for Russia and Iran, basically. This weird run of results, more than anything, gave us the false impression that it was a no-depth, weak weight. 6. A lopsided draw accentuated the impact of the upsets. There were at least 7 legit medal possibilities that were gone by the round of 16 in Yazdani's quarter alone because they were all bunched together. Arguably that same number were gone by the round of 16 from Amine's quarter too. Meanwhile, Reichmuth faced two non-contenders before finding himself with an upset possibility in the quarterfinals.
  11. I didn't mean it's the average size, but rather that it's very normal to find some fit men at that size in almost all nations.
  12. It's hard for me to wrap my mind around 86kg in general. How can it be weak? Everyone puts their best guy there that weighs between 78 and 94kg--a really normal weight range for a man's size all over the world. Is it really "weak" or are Yazdani and Taylor just that good right now? I think it's a little bit of both, but I think we could be selling the weight short.
  13. One more thing: Usually the win/loss percentage is more predictive of team performance down the road than the "luck of the draw" UWW scoring system. You can rack up UWW points with easy draws that get you those "filler" 5th and 7th place positions where you actually went 1-2 or 2-2--losing all your matches against decent opponents. Winning percentage exposes those mediocre performances. Comparing Kazakhstan to the US and others this year in terms of the more predictive statistic (winning percentage): 2. Kazakhstan: 25-15 (60%) 3. United States: 22-9 (71%) 4. Iran: 20-9 (69%) 5. Georgia: 18-10 (64%) 6. India: 18-10 (64%) 7. Azerbaijan: 16-11 (59%) (Russia won 89% at 41-5 by the way, but they deserve their own category this year.)
  14. Kazakhstan's men have often been Top 10 in greco, so their performance there wasn't that strange. Their women placed 6th this time and haven't been top 10 in a while. But they were top 10 as recently as 2013 and even finished 2nd in 2009. Those two results feel like pretty standard performances with the home mat boost that everyone gets. The 2nd in freestyle is the aberration in my opinion and, as others have said, came because of them taking advantage of great draws. With average-level draws, I'm guessing they would have been in the 5-6th range.
  15. We say this to comfort ourselves; but let's be honest with ourselves: we would "care" a lot more if we were good.
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