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DocRevue

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Everything posted by DocRevue

  1. 1. Wrong. Perry was very talkative and outgoing at Iowa. 2. Cuttin' weight. 3. Like his dad and his uncles, Perry has a mean streak a mile wide and that shows a lot more when competing than it does as an assistant coach.
  2. DF pisses people off because he points out absurdities and truths about the sport and its personalities, and particularly a certain personality who frequents this board, that American wrestling fans generally don't like to discuss.
  3. Cross-country races and workouts are nothing like marathons and marathon workouts. High school cross-country races are about 1.5-3 miles long. That's around six to 15 minutes of all out effort - a prolonged sprint. It's ABO the whole way. Cross country runners do not have the option, as wrestlers do, of lying back and relying on technique to win. They must exert full effort throughout a race to win. It was very enlightening to see what the athletic trainers at wrestling powerhouses like JMU think about training for wrestling. You might consider taking a look at what wrestlers at minor players such as Penn State, Minnesota, Iowa and Okie State ACTUALLY do - there are a fair amount of one to three or four mile hard runs mixed in with their conditioning, as well as short sprints and lots and lots of 400s. Many, if not most, Division I wrestlers, even those without cross-country experience, are very strong runners, especially at distances from 400m to 2 or three miles. There is a significant amount of cross-over between the gas tank one needs to keep one's muscles going through a six to seven minute wrestling match and a 10-20 minute hard run.
  4. True, if Morrison wrestles to seed Oklahoma State has a chance to win if he picks up some bonus. But, given that it took Oklahoma State bringing 10 wrestlers, getting good to great performances out of nine of them, putting the entire middle of its lineup in the finals, and crowning two champs just to get within shouting distance - I don't know how unhappy they can be. On the other hand, Minny brought only nine and was in a position to win with only seven of those guys putting in good performances. If the Dardanes boys place, you win. If they wrestle to seed, you win going away - and that's with Nelson getting upset in the final.
  5. It's not really biting the hand that feeds because ESPN actually does want to know what it can do better - it wants to know what can be improved to increase its viewership and the fan experience. If these criticisms came from an actual competitor, ESPN might be a bit sensitive, but they don't. That said, wow are most of these huge stretches. I agree that Amin is not perfect and that he knows very little about wrestling but he is professional and he learns - he doesn't make the same mistakes over and over again. I watch a lot of sports and the ONLY play-by-play guy I've ever seen who can own a broadcast of a sport that is not his bread-and-butter is Al Michaels. Amin is no Al Michaels but he does a more than adequate job considering the subtle complexities of folkstyle wrestling. Mistakes happen during every broadcast and they are very easy to pick out when you know a sport inside and out like the Flo guys. A college basketball fanatic would have a similar criticism of NCAA basketball tourney broadcasts. Given the staggering number of matches to call and decisions to make during the course of this tournament, ESPN must have done a pretty good job if these were the biggest gripes Flo could find with the broadcast.
  6. Oklahoma State, because if I'm Minnesota I'm sick about what could have been had the Dardanes brothers performed.
  7. If anything, college wrestling is not ENOUGH of a business. The behavior of the coach you describe has nothing to do with business. It's just an example of a personality flaw - either the coach is a flake or did not have the balls to tell your friend to face-to-face that he was not comfortable giving a reference. Recruiting is a business. It's competitive and risky. Coaches don't recruit kids to come to a program and be their good buddies. They recruit them to fill a spot and contribute to a program. Just as in business, sometimes the personalities click and sometimes they don't. Sometimes differences in personalities can be set aside for the good of the program and sometimes they can't. What college wrestling is not is high school wrestling. College coaches typically treat their wrestlers as adults. They expect their wrestlers to be self starters. They do not have the time or inclination to put up with kids who persist with bad behavior - particularly kids who are not major contributors to the team - because they don't have to. A high school coach spends a lot of his time cleaning up messes, trying to mentor kids with crappy home lives or a lack of discipline. College coaches have the option to send those types of kids packing - and they do. My experience is that most college wrestling coaches are pretty straight shooters and pretty good guys, but they are straight shooters and good guys with a job to do. I still keep in contact with my college coaches, but the relationship is professional, not the father/son dynamic I have with my high school coach.
  8. I agree with you that more stalling calls won't create action the way some people seem to think it will. The most active wrestlers - Cael, David Taylor, Q. Wright, the Brands brothers, for example - are never motivated by fear of a stalling call or even the desire to have their opponent called for stalling. They are motivated by a burning desire to dominate their opponent by scoring offensive points, and they do not fear fatigue nor being scored upon. It's a mindset and not a product of the rules. Unfortunately, no matter how much wrestling incentivizes scoring and penalizes stalling, it will always remain good strategy for wrestlers with stellar defensive skills to keep matches close and win matches by one point that they could never win by eight points. The only way to significantly improve the amount of action in wrestling is to create a culture where the go-for-broke Q. Wright mindset is the dominant mentality amongst the athletes rather than the minority mindset. Kids need to be taught that this is the CORRECT way to wrestle, just as baseball players are taught from an early age that running out every ground ball - even ones where there is a 99 percent plus chance of being thrown out - is the CORRECT way to play baseball even though there is no rule requiring it.
  9. Unfortunately, wrestling may be the only sport in this country where a significant number of fans actually would question a decision to hold the sport's flagship championship event in New York City - the biggest destination city in the U.S. and the greatest sports town in the world. Wrestling fans never cease to amaze. That said, the event will definitely sell out and holding the NCAA's in NYC - at MSG, no less - is huge. Yes, NYC is expensive, but 20 million people manage to live there full-time - you'll be able to manage for a couple of days, wrestling fans.
  10. Really? I hit this move all the time in full go practices in high school and college, and I wasn't any superstar. I wasn't even a very good athlete. An above-average high school wrestler has more than enough spatial awareness to pull this off in competition if they've practiced it. The difference with Taylor is that he can do it in the Big 10 finals against a tough opponent and make it look like he's drilling. Wrestling needs more athletes who can do that, not fewer.
  11. In the situation, the guy running is stalling. You're not setting the other guy up if he isn't following you. You have no obligation to follow him. Also, my point is that Mega can't score on the edge, so he shouldn't stay there and permit Delgado to run time off the clock hugging on the edge. Shove Delgado off, stop the clock and get back to the middle. I mean, I watched Gable-era wrestlers do this to Okie State for decades. It's not rocket science. That may very well be true, but if the refs don't call it stalling, it's not stalling. Mega may not be able to score on the edge, but he also can't score without being close or tying up, and Delgado won't let him when he feels he's in danger. I think you're oversimplifying things. As a former guy who was not as mobile as some of my opponents, I understand very well what Megaludis is going through. He is simply wrestling a guy who is quicker and shiftier from the feet, which forces him to engage to slow him down, which creates the opportunity for Delgado to do what he keeps doing. I agree with you that it's Megaludis's fault that he keeps falling for the same trap, but I just don't know what he could be doing that's that different. The Gable era guys benefitted from two things Megaludis doesn't: (1) there were very, very few refs who could withstand Gable yelling "STALLING!!!" in their face for more than a minute or two... and (2) they were generally better conditioned than their opponents, and significantly so. Cael is not Gable and Mega is not better conditioned than Delgado. Agreed that if the ref doesn't call it, it isn't stalling. All I'm saying is there is no way Mega gets tagged for stalling for pushing Delgado out on the edge in neutral or failing to follow a retreating Delgado to the edge. Following this strategy would not necessarily given Mega the benefit of a stalling call against Delgado but it would have given Mega a better chance to control the match on his own terms. Instead, Mega let Delgado dictate the match by repeatedly following Delgado to the edge and tying up there, giving himself a very low probability of scoring from neutral. Above you said I was oversimplifying things. I think I would be oversimplifying things if I were saying that Mega would have WON had he followed this strategy and executed these tactics. But that's not what I'm saying. I'm just saying that there was at least one way to limit or even negate the effectiveness of Delgado's strategy and thereby limit or negate the edge Delgado created by following that strategy, but instead of doing that Mega just did exactly what Delgado expected and wanted him to do.
  12. I thought Cael's commentary was funny but it didn't have any teeth, as McIntosh just stood around and prayed for a stall call. McIntosh either had no idea how to attack Heflin or no confidence in his attacks, and he (correctly) feared ending up under Heflin off of a counter. What I don't really understand is McIntosh's hesitancy in the third overtime period. He didn't seem real gassed, and going into that period he'd all but already lost the match if he didn't score in the third overtime. But instead of going after Heflin he sits back all period and then takes that awful shot with no time left. Nonsensical approach.
  13. I still don't see how else he could've wrestled him. It's not like Delgado sits there on the edge waiting for Megaludis. He takes the match there through motion. Why can he do this? Because Megaludis needs to tie up to be most effective, while Delgado doesn't, which frees him up to take the match wherever he wants. I suppose an alternative would be to just sit there, not chase Delgado and refuse to engage. But then, who's stalling, the guy in motion or the guy standing still? I just don't think he has that many options because Delgado is that good and can move better than just about anyone in the country at any weight. Megaludis looks lead-footed in comparison. In the situation, the guy running is stalling. You're not setting the other guy up if he isn't following you. You have no obligation to follow him. Also, my point is that Mega can't score on the edge, so he shouldn't stay there and permit Delgado to run time off the clock hugging on the edge. Shove Delgado off, stop the clock and get back to the middle. I mean, I watched Gable-era wrestlers do this to Okie State for decades. It's not rocket science.
  14. To be fair, what exactly were his options? I just think Delgado is a mismatch. Mega needs to tie up to be at his best, but Delgado can be just as effective from a distance. How do you wrestle a guy who is quicker than you from the feet, has better footwork and can move around as quickly as he can shoot in on you if you try to close the gap, and can beat you on the mat? I'd be down wrestling on one knee too to try to neutralize his speed and length too. As for McIntosh, Heflin knew exactly what he needed to do to win: beat MM on the mat, where he has a significant advantage. I guess McIntosh could've shot more, but it's not like Heflin is easy to score on. Even Ed Ruth wasn't exactly lighting him up back when he was at 174. I don't think either guy could've done that much better with a different strategy. No problem with him tying up - it's tying and burning time on the edge of the mat that I took issue with. Either shove Delgado out on the edge or simply refuse to follow him to the edge. Quit following him and quit tying up and burning clock on the edge where you have zero chance to score. My criticism of McIntosh is that at least Heflin had a plan. McIntosh simply has to score takedowns to win that match, as you point out, because Heflin is the better mat wrestler. And scoring on Heflin is tough. But McIntosh really seemed to have no idea how he was even going to try to attempt to score on Heflin. McIntosh just didn't seem to trust his offense, which is really a tactical failing more than a strategic one.
  15. To be fair, what exactly were his options? I just think Delgado is a mismatch. Mega needs to tie up to be at his best, but Delgado can be just as effective from a distance. How do you wrestle a guy who is quicker than you from the feet, has better footwork and can move around as quickly as he can shoot in on you if you try to close the gap, and can beat you on the mat? I'd be down wrestling on one knee too to try to neutralize his speed and length too. As for McIntosh, Heflin knew exactly what he needed to do to win: beat MM on the mat, where he has a significant advantage. I guess McIntosh could've shot more, but it's not like Heflin is easy to score on. Even Ed Ruth wasn't exactly lighting him up back when he was at 174. I don't think either guy could've done that much better with a different strategy. No problem with him tying up - it's tying and burning time on the edge of the mat that I took issue with. Either shove Delgado out on the edge or simply refuse to follow him to the edge. Quit following him and quit tying up and burning clock on the edge where you have zero chance to score.
  16. This is a major source of frustration with me when it comes to watching and discussing wrestling. So much of the discussion focuses on the refs and stalling calls, while so little focuses on the strategy and tactics employed in the match and, just as importantly, the strategy and tactics that could have and should have been employed to obtain a different result. Was Delgado stalling? Yeah, I think he was. I think there could have been, maybe should have been, a call. But stalling or no stalling, the match was decided by Mega having NO plan for Delgado - no strategy going in and no adjustments as the match went on. Delgado wrestled a brilliant strategic and tactical match - and I have the feeling he would have adjusted his strategy and tactics had he been warned. Mega just kept beating his head against the same wall (which may be admirable when that is one's only option, but here it wasn't). And before anyone gets after me for criticizing Mega, I should say that I am a huge, huge fan of his. I think he's a great competitor and think the MegaSTALL reputation occasionally floated on these boards is undeserved. But he just got entirely sucked into Delgado's game plan in this match and had no plan to help him win the match. Same thing with McIntosh in the Heflin match - no plan. Hang around, have the coaches bait the refs and pray for a stalling call.
  17. Whatever the rules, this is always going to be a bad style matchup. Delgado relentlessly attacked McD because (in my opinion) he respected McD's offense but felt he had an advantage in scrambles off his own shots. In other words, he felt pressure to beat McD to the takedown and wasn't too worried about being under McD off his shot. With Mega, it's the opposite - he has less respect for Mega's ability to take him down off Mega's shot but respects Mega's scramble/funk ability and Mega's gas tank, so Delgado refuses to engage and instead restricts himself to attempting to score from frustrating Mega and capitalizing on his mistakes.
  18. Why does Mega permit Delgado to set up shop on the edge? Mega burned eons of clock just tying up Delgado and dancing on the edge. Borrow one from the old Iowa playbook and either (1) tie up Delgado and shove him off the mat for the restart; or (2) back up to the middle of the mat and wait for for Delgado there - instead of following Delgado everywhere just return to the center whenever he takes off for the edge.
  19. Penrith graduated in '88. Martin's freshman year was '86-'87. It's the same guy and I'm not sure why you think there was a misprint.
  20. JRob may have the hair, but Carl destroys him in the public speaking area. Q: Do you think you can win 10 AA honors again this year? JRob: Well, okay, uhhh YEAH! Okay? I mean, well this year is, uhhhh strong for us, okay? Q: What can you tell us about Connoway? Carl: We love him. He competes at a high level and he earned our utmost respect. 133, however, is not set in stone yet. Are you kidding? Cael is one of the worst interviews in all of sports. He's what Kimi Raikonnen would be if Kimi were not funny, not interesting, and answered everything in cliches.
  21. Problem is that across the board Title IX has not hindered US Olympic performance.
  22. I asked a simple question, Jason. What sport at any time in history has ever decided their championship based on separate competitions, each scored differently, with points carrying over from one to the next. That seems to me to be a pretty good question, since if wrestling were to actually adopt this proposal this is exactly what wrestling would be doing. The fact is that there is no track record of ever ever doing anything like this. Not in wrestling, and not in any other sport either. Seems to me there is some very real risk that this will not pan out, and why take such risk when the Championship is already a hit? Makes no sense to me. Actually, most motorsports pretty much do just that, except the competitions are scored more or less the same. NASCAR gimmicked up its format this year to include a winner take all elimination component but traditionally this is how motorsports determine their championships. The primary distinction in motorsports, however, is that all the competitors compete directly against each other week in and week out. Also, some skiing events decide each competition with a hybrid format - downhill/slalom (downhil time carries over to the slalom) combined and nordic combined (combination of two very disciplines - cross country skiiing and ski jumping), for example. Sports that offer an "all around" component do it - rodeo and gymnastics, for example. I'm not arguing it is the best way to do things but it's not totally unprecedented.
  23. The issue is not whether Title IX has impacted wrestling. It has and everyone who posts here is aware of that devastating impact. The issue is - where does wrestling go from here? The problem with bringing a decade-old article on a decades old problem into that debate is that a lot has changed in the past 10 years. Most institutions are now Title IX compliant, and a number of newer institutions have recently been the position of having to ADD men's sports to be both Title IX and NCAA-compliant. Wrestling programs that are being dropped now are being dropped, among other reasons, because they are not popular, do not generate revenue, and create difficulties in putting together conference affiliations due to the relative dearth of programs (which, I admit, is primarily a result of Title IX.) Title IX, while its merits may be debatable, has been remarkably successful at both creating access to college for women and expanding women's athletics. In doing so it has not harmed college sports' crown jewel, which is college football (for which, by the way, there is nothing resembling a women's equivalent - college football has weathered Title IX because it is insanely popular and generates revenue), nor has it harmed U.S. Olympic performance overall. In short, Title IX has made a huge omelet while breaking relatively few eggs. The political will to change Title IX is not there right now. There may be a day when there is such political will, but presently the overall level of satisfaction with it is high. Also, even a total repeal of Title IX alone is unlikely to help college wrestling very much, at least in the short run, because there is very little economic incentive to revive old programs. By and large, the programs that have been scrapped did not draw well and did not generate revenue. The only thing that can ensure wrestling's survival is to increase its popularity and its fanbase. And wrestling actually has an opportunity to do that in the present environment. Television coverage of the sport has increased dramatically over the past few years. ESPN has finally come around to understanding a few things that can really help wrestling: (1) its not going to get the NCAA basketball tournament soon; (2) the NCAA tournament is a great event; (3) wrestling has a pretty decent nationwide fanbase that gets excited about the NCAA tournament; and (4) people who aren't really wrestling fans will watch portions of the tournament as an alternative to basketball. ESPN wants, or is going to want, more. It likes wrestling as a product right now. The difficulty is that the tournament really cannot be expanded, and even if it could be the logistics of broadcasting the individual tournament are difficult. The duals present an opportunity to dramatically expand "championship" wrestling coverage (the only kind ESPN is really interested in) with a broadcast friendly format. The question is - will the wrestling community give it to them?
  24. Doesn't it really just depend on the kid - and the parent? And I don't think that's at odds with anything Koll says here. Koll introduced his kid to competition gradually and his kid has been successful and is apparently not burned out. Other kids have jumped into national competition at five, had great success and never burned out. I know a lot of guys who wrestled hundreds of competitive matches a year from peewees through high school, went to practice year round for years and really never got tired of wrestling. I also know a lot who kept that schedule who burnt out. I also know guys who didn't wrestle until junior high or high school, never wrestled more than 30 or 40 competitive matches per year, had success - and burnt out. It all depends on numerous individual factors - the kid, his parents, his home life, his desire to be involved in other sports/activities, injuries, academic goals, emotional maturity - there isn't any hard and fast rule, and I don't think Koll tries to set one other than don't be a dick who lives vicariously through your kid. Whether one lives vicariously through his kid is not assessed by when the kid started competing, how many matches he has per year or whether he participates in Tulsa Nationals. It is assessed by the parent's attitude, his relationship with his son and his own level of self-actualization.
  25. Coaches who confuse gaming the system with strategy and hold able-bodied wrestlers out of duals to protect seeds need to change their ways or go. It's poor "strategy," poor sportsmanship and, most importantly, terrible for fans. Coaches who are arguing that "it's the sport - it is what it is" or that the sport can't be grown nor marketed need to go, as well. Growth and marketing are imperative or the sport at the college level is dead.
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