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GoNotQuietly

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Posts posted by GoNotQuietly


  1. Depends if you mean someone who has perfect technique on what they do, like Sadulaev, Uguev, Cox, or someone who has a technique for every situation and can score using many moves, like Dake, Chamizo, Khinchegashvilli

    All time, I think it’s S. Belaglasov who could score the widest variety of techniques against world level competition with perfect form, but B. Saitiev transcended technique completely a lot of the time. When you’re making stuff up as you go and dominating the highest level, it’s meaningless to even say whether your technique is good or bad anymore.


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  2. Some highlights from ASUs Kinesiology program (my alma mater)
    -General Bio 1&2
    -General Chem 1&2
    -General physics 1&2
    -human anatomy & physiology 1&2
    -microbiology
    -organic chemistry 1
    -biomechanics
    -functional anatomy
    -physiology of exercise
    -abnormal psychology
     
    Far more science intensive than one may have realized. 

    This looks a lot like my undergrad coursework. That physics 2, organic chemistry, A&P 2, and philosophy semester while wrestling still gives me nightmares.


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  3. Payam  Zarrinpour Sacred Heart 2007

    Payam was so good. He was sacred heart’s only AA despite only really knowing how to wrestle freestyle. Easily the most body hair I have ever seen on a homo sapien. He was a really smart guy also and went on to be a physical therapist.

    The relationship between the U.S. and Iranian governments has a lot more to do with their respective relationships with other regional allies and enemies than any bad blood between their populations, so I would say the “Rocky mends the Cold War” idea with wrestling isn’t particularly likely. That said, bilateral goodwill through things like wrestling is definitely healthy to keep us off worse roads, imho.


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  4. I feel like I don't have any sense of which of our Olympic guys would go wrestle in the Worlds right after if they do/don't medal. Are some pissed off they didn't medal so try for the team for redemption? Are some who medal looking for legacy and want to rip through a couple medals in a short time? Are some content with a medal or gold performance and want to focus on the family and relax? Is it Olympic medal or bust so some don't try for the next team? 


  5. 21 hours ago, uncle bernard said:

    I think continuation has to start on the mat. For example, when guys hit doubles on the edge and get rolled through out of bounds, they usually just give 4 because the counter started out of bounds. 

    With Dake's throw, he started his move out of bounds. Gadz was running through an underhook knee pick, Dake planted his back foot and hipped in for the throw. If he had kept that back foot in bounds, he would not have been able to throw. To me, if a guy has to step out of bounds to initiate a counter, he shouldn't get points.

    Completely agree and well said. If you have to step out to initiate a counter, you have already stepped out under attack by definition and that one point should stop it.


  6. 8 hours ago, Red95 said:

    On Flo here:

    https://www.flowrestling.org/video/6963549-65-kg-ilyas-bekbulatov-uzb-vs-ernazar-akmataliev-kgz

    While the score was 8-0 before the fall the match seemed a lot closer. Bekbulatov was up 4-0 on a takedown and turn then nearly got thrown for 4 before he somehow turned it into his own 4 point throw. And the move where he got pinned was very nearly his own points to end it.

    Minor point given the result, but how in the world did they give Bekbulatov 4 there? I thought the defensive guy did not get continuation of action in order to score, and he was 100% in the air before putting his foot down to hit the toss. 


  7. “Article 48 – General Prohibitions
    Wrestlers are forbidden to:

    - Pull the hair, ears, genitals, pinch the skin, bite, twist fingers or toes, etc. and generally, to perform actions, gestures or holds with the intention of torturing the opponent or making him suffer to force him to withdraw.

    - Kick, head-butt, strangle, push, apply holds that may endanger the opponent’s life or cause a fracture or dislocation of limbs, tread on the feet of the opponent or touch his face between the eyebrows and the line of the mouth...

    ...These general prohibitions are sanctioned based on the severity of the foul (disqualification, caution-1(2) point or verbal warning). Disciplinary sanctions might also be applied after the competition against the athlete at fault.”


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  8. Coach Demeo had a great story about Dave Schultz complaining at a World championship that they had decided his FHL was illegal after the first round. Apparently, Coach slapped him in the face and told him he didn’t need the FHL and he won anyway. Ironically, using his “radar single” where he stepped on the foot and grabbed a high snatch single.

    Point is, some of the best competitors in the sport bend the rules as much as they can get away with. Even saw Helen, who I consider to be a very clean wrestler, yank a girl up by her entire face to get a lock at OTT.


    It is up to the refs to protect the athletes, first and foremost, which they shouldn’t forget. Some refs, especially some foreign ones, seem to sadistically delight in pain being inflicted even outside the rules, or at least they won’t interfere. I think that is terrible for the sport; if you want to be a cage fighter, there is no shortage of opportunities to do that.


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  9. It's an absolutely brutal weight. This is the results of the 2019 Worlds:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2019_World_Wrestling_Championships_–_Men's_freestyle_65_kg

    One example:

    Haji Aliev has three World Golds and an Olympic Bronze

    First round he barely lost to Rashidov who went on to win the tournament, and was a double Silver previously

    After he won his first repechage round, he had the defending gold medalist, Takuto Otoguro, who he lost to 11-9

    Otoguro won another match then lost to Musukaev for the bronze medal match.

    So, neither Otoguro nor Aliev medaled. 

    We aren't necessarily terrible here, it's just an absolutely brutal weight class 

     


  10. 11 hours ago, whaletail said:

    I wonder the same.

    He blew through JB on that first match TD, then coasted, confident in his defense.  And it makes strategic sense when wrestling a legendary re-attacker like JB.  If you can get to a chest wrap or crotch lift off your opponent's shot, as he did, why risk a shot that costs a lot of energy, and could backfire?

    I wish he'd attack more when wrestling the top guys, but his strategy makes (if that is his strategy) makes sense, and a lot of the top Russians seem to wrestle similarly.

    If his goal has been to win all his matches without getting hurt and come in to the Olympics to destroy people => Gold Medal

    If his goal is to defend the throne of being number one and coast to a Gold Medal => Trouble

    Luckily, he has an outstanding coaching and support staff a couple of few who have already been on top of this podium and know what it is like.

    Even the greatest Russians, Saitiev and Karelin, have famously faltered at the Olympics by being too conservative and/or looking past guys who are hungry.


  11. I don’t think there was either anything wrong nor anything particularly courageous about JBs interview, but if you really want to have your heart ripped out, go watch the one right after he lost at Rio. That was devastating , candid, and raw.

    From that, it seemed like Burroughs had his mind on carrying team USA, getting the huge money for his family to be set, and cementing his legacy as U.S. GOAT. I hope Dake can be more almost psychopathically focused on winning each match and forgetting everything else. Knowing Chamizo and Sidakov are there might help, actually

    I do worry about how Taylor deals with the pressure of being the favorite to win Gold. It seems, from the outside, like he has been feeling the heat this whole year already. Will be a real test for Cael to get his mind right to go blaze through like he is capable of.

    Sorry for the armchair sports psych, these guys are champions but there is nothing else even remotely like the Olympics


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  12. You see zero chance of a gold?

    Never zero, but I am going on the assumptions that A)He would have to beat both Geno AND Taka and B)No one has ever done that. Would be thrilled to be proved wrong, as always


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  13. High/Low (Highest USA Flo ranking if you only count the number one from each country)

    57: Bonze/DNP (None ranked)

    65: DNP (Yianni would be 8)

    74: Gold/Bronze (Dake 3rd)

    86: Gold/Silver (Taylor 1st)

    97: Bronze/DNP (Cox was 2, Snyder 3)

    125: Silver/Bronze (Gable would be 7)

    https://www.flowrestling.org/rankings/6634709-2020-21-international-rankings-mens-freestyle/38122-57-zaur-uguev
    Can't wait to hear what @Jon_Kozak says, in whatever medium he choses.


  14. And I believe it was 0.4 kg, so about 0.9 lbs.  

    I have seen it both ways, lbs and kilos. The Flo article says a few tenths of kilo, but who knows what that means. It sounds like he weighed in twice AFTER the official weigh ins; once over weight and once under weight, and never actually weighed in during the scheduled time. No clue what that means for the appeal. Would the committee have been more lenient if he made weight at 8:04am rather than missing it then? What a mess.


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  15. Ok, so I've now cracked where you went to school, working on identifying you fully. Not sure if you've ever said it, but for some reason this sent me on a detective mission.

    Haha I am very not hard to find, but I won’t ruin your puzzle if you’re enjoying sleuthing.


    Also did this at the southern scuffle maybe 2 years earlier than the year you’re talking and agree, it is common practice, actually I think we were around 2-3 lbs over and not .4.  The only thing I’d add is that it was yes a prematch ( get the nerves and funk out of you) but we were working out at the arena close to where weigh ins would be taking place.  If there was a confusion a coach or teammate would have come out and said they were off in weigh ins which would have been a horrible miscommunication, but we were there in plenty of time to fix a time adjustment, again for 2-3 pounds not .4, he was really pushing that limit wouldn’t you say?


    I think we normally got to working out about an hour before weigh ins started, so yeah I agree that Cox getting there right when he thought they started was cutting it close, but then again he knew it was not going to be hard. Whichever workout room was available was normally close to weighins, though occasionally weigh ins were sometimes in more obscure parts of the arenas. We did have a whole team to tell us about something weird at weigh ins; this normally meant the scales which were heavy/light. For all the talk about 0.4, the scales often have a tolerance range and calibration schedule not really up to the task, but I don’t want to open that whole can of worms.

  16. 16 minutes ago, pa in taiwan said:

    Fools should be focusing on REAL questions, like can Steveson take on and defeat these two monsters: Taha Akgul and Geno Petriashvili. These two are the cream of the senior men's heavyweight division, and like Gable, they move like lightweights, with crisp, fast leg attacks, excellent scrambling skills, and motors that don't stop. They are also tall and strong, and they will have significant advantage with leverage over Steveson. I can't wait to see Gable against one of these two. 

     

    This is an awesome (and terrifying) video! thanks for sharing.


  17. 3 hours ago, AnklePicker said:

    It’s not stupid. It’s very plausible. Comparing what you did for a meaningless college dual to the Olympic freaking trials is stupid. I would certainly say it to his face if I were his coach. But then again if I were his coach no chance in hell this even happens. 

    Did it before the Southern Scuffle with my teammate who pinned Caldwell and beat Schlatter in the finals there. Also did it before the University World Team Trials where I took 3rd. I am telling you this is the common practice in higher levels of wrestling also, but you go off, I guess...


  18. Heck yeah. Love JO. Underrated technical and tactical mind, and by all accounts a great guy who brings up everyone around him.  Always just needed things to align like 5% differently to go his way, and he seems to be on the path. Fingers crossed for Last Chance.


  19. 57 minutes ago, wrestlingnerd said:

    Excellent comments as usual, but I disagree on the Geduev strategy. Dake said in an interview recently that he wanted to evolve his style to combine that of three guys: Sadulaev, Muskaev (I was surprised by this one), and Cox. When pressed for why Cox, he said he wanted to keep that to himself. Now we see what he meant. The purposefulness and fluidity of Dake's footwork was reminiscent of Cox and he completely confused JB. Did JB ever control the wrestling? I felt like Dake imposed his style on JB for the first time ever and JB didn't know how to adjust. All the openings JB was used to getting on Dake were closed, and whenever Dake gave put himself in a risky position, he immediately pounced into a more advantageous position by jamming JB's head down (with his ass, no less) while threatening 2+ points. We saw a glimpse of it against Ringer in that best of 3, but Dake's motion and handfighting were at another level last night and what won him the series and likely what will win him the gold medal. The man has been doing serious work in his garage.

    Incidentally, JO should get some credit for Dake 2.0. Dake himself gives props to JO for helping him with his motion. 

    This is really smart, and you could definitely see the JO influence with the Muhammad Ali style dance he did in the second match. He was moving amazingly and even feeling himself in a swaggery way we have only ever seen on the other side of this matchup.

    I should define what I mean by the Geduev template to beat Burroughs, as it is equally psychological as tactical and consists of three main things Dake also did:

    1. Punch Back. Burroughs triggers his offense off of repeatedly illegally punching people in the face and no ref on Earth has the stones to DQ him for it. Rather than immediately complaining to the ref, which also confirms to Jordan that he is winning, Geduev got in his space and shoved him backwards about ten feet.  In these matches, Dake repeatedly clubbed Jordan in the back of the head and disrespectfully palmed the side of his face. He only complained to the ref when there was a finger in his actual eyeball, which I don't think you can reasonably endure. 

    2. Check Down. on every single break they both either went to the Gorilla stance or dropped to both knees and did not come up even one bit to allow a Burroughs reattack where he is truly lethal. Neither of them ever came up until they had at least a hand on Burroughs to gauge where the heck he was.

    3. Fight Everything. Of the few people who can beat Burroughs, no one ever really does it by surrendering even one easy takedown to him, aside from maybe Chamizo once. There were quite a few times when a reasonable person would have bailed rather than clawing their way back to the chest wrap position, but Dake was constantly challenging and threatening him in every position and growing in confidence every time. Gedeuv and Dake were ready to battle for every single second of their matches, when people like Zahid, Taylor, and a hundred others thought they could cost for a second and paid the price.

    Huge ups to Coach Gray and Dake's whole team for implementing a pretty flawless gameplan against one of the best competitors to ever live.

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