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merman

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  1. If he did have a point to make, it was not a very good one. Let's assume that Taylor is from 5th to 8th best in the world, but the 3rd best in the US. Now let's assume that Ed Ruth is ranked out of the top 10 in the world, but will consistently make the world team. I would expect Ed Ruth to have a better international career.
  2. merman

    Lee Kemp

    "I saw further because I stood on the shoulders of giants." - Isaac Newton I don't think this is too hard of a concept. Think about this in terms of natural selection and evolution. The best wrestlers will be the ones with the most effective technique, training, style etc. These wrestlers then coach the next generation of wrestlers, who take that information, add to it, and then coach the next generation, so on and so forth Thereby, the sport becomes better as time passes. I can't put a certain date on when the technique suddenly is comparable to modern technique, as this process doesn't happen by leaps and bounds, just like apes didn't suddenly become man in a certain year. Just like you wouldn't argue that monkeys are the greatest species on Earth, I wouldn't claim that any wrestler from the 70's can be considered one of the greatest wrestlers. I asked if you could find any inconsistencies/counter examples in this way of thinking. It seems to make a whole lot of sense to me. The anecdote of Gable turning guys in the practice room is not relevant. Not only is the story likely exaggerated, but disregards the fact that its not the Gable that wrestled in the 1970's. Gable evolved with the sport. Additionally, There is a huge gap between the statements, "Gable could turn Lewis in the practice room," and "the quality of wrestling in the 1970's is on par with that of today." Stop fooling yourselves guys.
  3. merman

    Lee Kemp

    1992 John Smith would lose to the likes of Asgarov, Batirov, and Kudukhov (RIP). Anything that can be improved through technological innovation will be improved as time progresses. Wrestling can be improved as new techniques are introduced. Therefore, modern day wrestling is better. Find a counter example to that and you will have my attention. Don't try too hard though, I don't want you to miss the price is right or the antiques roadshow played at full volume.
  4. merman

    Lee Kemp

    I can agree with much more here. Sorry to jump on you, it's just that so many people try to pass off their opinions as fact, and have a confirmation bias as they look backwards for evidence. Everyone looks great in their highlight video. You think Kemp could get to the legs of today's wrestlers today. I disagree, I see a lack of evidence of the motion or handfighting necessary for todays competition. Furthermore, the defense on those videos is relatively primitive. They just weren't as creative in using their hips and leverage to counter. I don't know much about baseball, however, so I'm going to stay out of that. I makes sense that more baseball was played in your time, as the internet, cable tv and video games didn't exist and kids had to entertain themselves. I don't think that is true for all sports, however. I would doubt that elite youth or high school wrestlers of today have ever trained less.
  5. merman

    Lee Kemp

    Customfitch, You think that old time athletes trained more in their youth and high school years, which led to their greater practical strength. I don't think you can support those claims with any evidence. I think you don't know what you are talking about, and are just an old man with unfounded opinions reminiscing about the glory days.
  6. merman

    Lee Kemp

    Are we now using sports reports as scientific fact? Most of those claims have been debunked by actual science, rather than the "facts" produced by 48 yr old cigar smoking blow hards trying to sell headlines. These same guys claimed Mantle hit a 565 footer, Boggs drank 64 beers on a cross country flight, and Wilt banged out 20,000 in his career. Sports writers exaggerate and old timers reminisce about how tough everyone used to be. Lee Kemp was a great wrestler but far from immune when it comes to these things. Do you also beleive that the Russians went door to door through the entire Soviet Union to find a guy to beat Gable as well? I agree that sportswriters of old did have a tendency toward hyperbole and the exact distances baseballs fly are of course not accurate to the foot. So nobody will know exactly how far these balls were hit but unless there was a massive conspiracy between the sportswriters, players, coaches, and spectators who were there to witness these shots, you have to concede that some of them did indeed happen. So you can say with some confidence that Mantle did hit the upper facade at the old stadium, barely missing hitting it out of the stadium and that Babe Ruth hit several bombs including 1) out of Navin Field (Tiger Stadium) 2) out of Old Comiskey 3) out of the Polo Grounds 4) into the 45th row of bleachers in right-center field at Fenway (holy $hit). So even though the new generation of players is stronger, more advanced, etc than these guys, why can't anybody reach these distances? I think it is because the old timers developed their ability by playing more (especially in their youth) and thus developing practical strength. I think it is a similar thing with wrestlers. Concentration and repetition on the basics until it is second nature. And yes I think they practiced and trained more back then, especially in the formative h.s. years. I think you don't know what you are talking about.
  7. merman

    Lee Kemp

    My iPhone 3gs was the best phone at one time, but no one would argue that it is one of the best phones ever. The walkman was the best way to play music at one time, but it has been surpassed by the mp3. Whenever a product can be improved through technical innovation, the product will undeniably become better with time. Therefore, you can only reasonably claim that a wrestler is the best of his era. If their era is today, then you can claim them as the best ever. You can certainly say that these old guys, given time to adapt to the rules and technique of today, could compete at a high level, but I really don't think anyone is debating that, correct?
  8. First, I just looked up the top 10 pound for pound rankings, and only half of them wrestled collegiately. The rankings before that, 6 of 10 were not wrestlers in college (JDS, Pettis, Silva, D. Johnson, Barao, Aldo). While I do believe wrestlers transition better to MMA than any other sport, I think dominate is a poor choice of words. In the long run, the dominant representatives of MMA will not be wrestlers who transition to MMA, but rather individuals who train MMA from a very young age. To address your question, Russian wrestlers are compensated better than comparable American wrestlers, so they have little reason to transition to MMA. There are probably some other reasons, but I'm guessing thats the biggest one.
  9. I highly doubt that the claim, there is nothing better for any body than intensive yoga, is widely accepted, which is probably why it's not common among athletes, excluding Moza Fay. Why are you making such an unfounded claim? Loving the Kenny Powers quote though Jaroslav. Wish I could leave work right now for Shabooms.
  10. The Russians freestyle team warms up exactly like the USA freestyle team warms up. They dont do anything magical. I don't really believe in warming up much, at least not stretching. Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't studies show that stretching before exercise does not decrease the risk of injury. Additionally, I've read that static stretching decreases muscle strength and power. A light jog might be beneficial to get the heart rate up and blood moving, but thats certaintly nothing that couldn't be done through a light drill or some wrestling related exercise.
  11. I think you're right. It seemed as if many of the weight training coaches at the college level have been taught how to train the football team, and then take the same approach with the wrestling team. It's a different sport that requires different training. It's not just the cc running thats ridiculous. The buddy carry stadium stairs could have been the most moronic training they ever put me through. I think my knees and lower back are still recovering, and in the long run I'm sure I will need some minor surgeries. D1 wrestling is a grind. There needs to be some sort of balance between training hard and also having a functional body after graduation. Both of my head coaches in college had 10+ knee surgeries, and these were not old men either (20's and 30's).
  12. As a former college wrestler, I found weight training to be largely worthless and often detrimental activity during the season. What little strength gains were made (nearly impossible to do while on a measly diet) were more than offset by increased risk of injury and mental fatique/burnout. Additionally, when I would try to score during practice and failed, I wasn't sure if it was my technique that was poor, or because of the soreness from the 5 sets of leg squats from that morning's lift. Perhaps this is a better topic for another section, but I figured I would put this out there and see if any former wrestlers or coaches have had the same experience/thoughts. Should I have titled this "Why I don't put much stock in weight training?"
  13. It's about time. This is a prime example of a good wrestler that made for a horrible coach. There was plenty of talent that failed to develop in that room under his watch. Furthermore, the team's APR got so poor that they couldn't even compete in the postseason last year.. There has to be a talented somebody down in Colorado Springs there thats looking to transition to coaching?
  14. Wire, What gives you the impression that No. Colorado is headed in the right direction? Cherrington has run that program into the ground..
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