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rcoates1

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  1. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to BigTenFanboy in From a Buckeye Perspective   
    They do have Varner in the room..
  2. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to hammerlockthree in Ohio State vs Rutgers   
    this is one of the most insanely idiotic things I've ever read.....
  3. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to Tofurky in Trackwrestling let one slide   
    Hahahaha! You might want to have your prostate checked, amigo... but not by Tsirtsis.
     
     
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to russelscout in Trackwrestling let one slide   
    maybe not for some ladies, but others yes, it is.
  5. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from Tofurky in Trackwrestling let one slide   
    Never heard it put this way and I laughed so hard I might have pissed a little. Good form 10/10
  6. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to russelscout in Penn State vs. Michigan   
    I can see cenzo. Nick Lee just lost to another freshman. Pump dem brakes on that one.
  7. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from Yellow_Medal in Montorie Bridges   
    Yeah the whole ok state team is getting a pass because it’s the first time they’ve ever competed at elevation. Brock certainly did out wrestle him after Montorie went up 6-0. I’m pretty sure he got taken down four or five times, but he did fend off takedowns for the final minute of the match. Which I think most upsets happen in the last minute rather than the first
     
    I figured he would lose to terao and Sherman was a toss up match. He is certainly overly exceeding expectations.
  8. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to TBar1977 in Carson Kuhn to PSU   
    Before Mission Tanner Hall beat Kyle Snyder. After mission, can't beat Nick Nevills. 
  9. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from Yellow_Medal in Montorie Bridges   
    I’m certainly biased as this is my hometown team... But why is nobody talking about Montorie Bridges? He has beat two top five guys this season. He just majored Terao, after beating Brock his last time out.
  10. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to wrestlingnerd in Biggest Surprise In Big Ten   
    I never said Cael petitioned ISU to get Douglas fired... Remember why that was even brought up... You did say you were not properly educated on the matter so maybe you don't feel this way now, but the context was you found something wrong with Metcalf not calling Tom about the ISU offer he had to take (can we at least agree on that, given it was a life changer?). I brought up an example in which a guy you hold in extremely high regard also didn't do that and, to boot, was instrumental in getting his would-be advisor on the matter fired. You're not holding Cael's situation to the same standard despite the severity of the matter being much higher. Why?
     
    Again, Cael may not have petitioned, but per the admin's own words, he fired Douglas to get Cael the job, which is something he regrets in retrospect since Cael then made an even more mercenary move to PSU, taking DT with him, leaving ISU high and dry.
     
    By the way, I don't have a problem with what Cael did... He is ridiculously successful in wrestling and life because he recognizes opportunity and knows how to go after it. I do feel for Douglas and think the situation could've been handled a little better, but good for Cael for landing the PSU gig that's going to make him a coaching legend.
  11. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to LordNelson in Montorie Bridges   
    Definitely a sleeper as the end of the season approaches.  I give Bridges credit for keeping the win as opposed to giving Brock "a pass".
    Brock's supposed to be a top talent and title contender, things happen and yada yada but credit has to be given.  The best of the best either do not make those types of mistakes or account for them by completing the comeback.
     
    Next time they meet like many I'd pick Brock but that doesn't diminish the fact that Bridges earned that win.
    Altitude Schmaltitude.
    Heil proved in his last outing that maybe Jack/Meredith, etal are actually just that good.  Something we've suspected all along.
  12. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to cornercoach in Montorie Bridges   
    ...great name too!!!....
  13. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to wrestlingnerd in Montorie Bridges   
    Great topic. I think a lot of people give Brock a pass on that loss, and therefore give Bridges an asterisk on the 1-point win, because Brock gave up 6 points on a very poorly executed throw due to overconfidence or perhaps altitude-induced temporary stupor. Majoring Terao 10-2 as a follow-up is a big deal though. Did anyone see the match?
     
    Bridges had one hell of a weekend, going 4-0 and beating not only Terao but also Zach Sherman (UNC), who has been wrestling very well overall.
  14. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to gowrestle in Montorie Bridges   
    He could be the surprise of this wrestling season. He is a tough kid.
  15. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to Gantry in Oklahoma State vs NC State in Italy   
    Getting rid of the RT point (or at least unless you get backs) is a better solution. 
  16. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from Jasonmitchell32 in The “why did Lee MFF?â€� thread   
    I don’t think he got hurt and I don’t think he or the coaches were throwing a tantrum or saving face. I think it was purely precautionary. They wanted to see how he would do against suriano, when he lost the risk reward was not worth it. This isn’t the first time a guy has lost and then just MFF out of the tournament. This is his last competition for his year, most likely. No need to risk hurting the knee or something else. This tournament was simply a measuring stick on whether to pull the red shirt or not.
  17. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from BLT in The “why did Lee MFF?â€� thread   
    I don’t think he got hurt and I don’t think he or the coaches were throwing a tantrum or saving face. I think it was purely precautionary. They wanted to see how he would do against suriano, when he lost the risk reward was not worth it. This isn’t the first time a guy has lost and then just MFF out of the tournament. This is his last competition for his year, most likely. No need to risk hurting the knee or something else. This tournament was simply a measuring stick on whether to pull the red shirt or not.
  18. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to TobusRex in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    Ken Kraft was (arguably) the greatest homegrown serial killer the city of Chicago ever produced, having murdered 3 dozen homeless youths during a 2 week stretch in 1957.  Tiring of serial killing he retired and transferred his skills to the food industry, where he developed Kraft Macaroni and Cheese and the best damn Ranch dressing you'll ever taste.
     
    Ken was ultimately killed in a hail of gunfire when robbing a bodega in New York City.
    That's the Ken Kraft you were asking about, right?
  19. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from tabenn in The “why did Lee MFF?â€� thread   
    I don’t think he got hurt and I don’t think he or the coaches were throwing a tantrum or saving face. I think it was purely precautionary. They wanted to see how he would do against suriano, when he lost the risk reward was not worth it. This isn’t the first time a guy has lost and then just MFF out of the tournament. This is his last competition for his year, most likely. No need to risk hurting the knee or something else. This tournament was simply a measuring stick on whether to pull the red shirt or not.
  20. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to russelscout in SPENCER LEE GOES DOWN   
    Wow. Is it possible that Lee losing a close match with a questionable call at the end, against a guy who keeps it close, in his redshirt year, isn't as dire of a situation as you guys are making it out to be? The midlands wasn't the toughest this year, but Iowa still won it comfortably with 5 champs. Just seems like an odd time to be talking about how the Brand's should be fired and how Iowa State will unseat Iowa as an instate power. Iowa wrestled tough this weekend! The Iowa hate on this site is unbearable at times.
  21. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from HurricaneWrestling in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    As I was watching the midlands I began to wonder who is the man this tournament is named after, so I decided to do some research.
     
    Ken Kraft grew up in the small town of Sterling, Illinois about 115 miles due west of Chicago. He wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Famer Homer Musgrove. He qualified twice for the IHSA State Finals — once as a junior at 145 lbs. in 1952 and again in his senior year at 154 lbs. where he placed third.
     
    Following his graduation from Sterling in 1953, Ken enrolled at Northwestern University where he wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Fame Coach Jack Riley.
    Ken placed third in the Big Ten Tournament at 167 lbs. in 1956. In the following year he went on to capture the 167 lbs. Big Ten Title as well as finishing in the top six in the NCAA Wrestling Championships. However, being a student-athlete was literally just the beginning of Ken’s association with Northwestern.
     
    When Ken graduated from Northwestern in 1957 he took over as the Head Wrestling Coach — a position he would hold for the next 22 years. During his tenure as Head Coach the Wildcats had a dual meet record of 128-106-5. Eleven Conference Champions and fourteen All-Americans were produced under Ken Kraft’s tutelage, including two NCAA Champions — his brother Art at 157 lbs. in 1960 and Mark Massery at 126 lbs. in 1973. Twice Ken’s Wildcats finished in the top ten of the NCAA Championships.
     
    One of Ken’s greatest contributions to the sport of wrestling was the founding of the Midlands Championships in 1963. Exasperated with the long drive to wrestle in the only Christmas wrestling tourney in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Ken drew together a few close associates and established the Midlands Wrestling Tournament. The Midlands brings the very best in amateur wrestling to Northwestern’s Welsh-Ryan Arena every December between Christmas and New Years. In 2012, the Midlands, now known as the Ken Kraft Midlands, will commemorate its Golden Anniversary.
     
    Ken was part of the organizing committee of the United States Wrestling Federation (forerunner to USA Wrestling) and served on its Board from 1965 through 1980. Additionally, Ken served two terms as its President. In 1971 he was USA Team Leader for the World Championships. Ken also helped found the Mayor Daley Youth Foundation wrestling program. In 1970 he assumed the task of hosting and directing the NCAA Wrestling Championships at Northwestern. 1976 marked the year in which he presided over the dedication of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame — the same year he was named USWF’s Man of the Year. His depth of knowledge has led him to write numerous articles on the sport as well as an instructional text. For eighteen years Ken served as the wrestling expert for ABC’s Wide World of Sports as well as ESPN, Sports Channel and the Fox Sports Network. He also served as a “color” commentator for both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. In 1997 Ken was instrumental in forming the Illinois Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame; Ken currently resides on the Chapter Committee as Chairman Emeritus.
     
    The respect he commands from his peers has led to a number of honors. Ken has been inducted into the IWCOA Hall of Fame, 1973; has been named its Man of the Year, 2004; and received its Lifetime Achievement Award, 2001. The National Wrestling Hall of Fame bestowed Ken with its Order of Merit in 1996. In 1998 Ken was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as a Distinguished Member. In 2005, in recognition of Ken’s service and contributions to the sport and to the University, Northwestern designated its renovated wrestling area as The Ken Kraft Wrestling Complex. Ken described the facility as “…among the best in college wrestling.”
     
    Although “officially” retired, Ken continues to be involved with the Wildcat wrestling program and as a tournament administrator for the Ken Kraft Midlands Championships.
  22. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from TheOhioState in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    As I was watching the midlands I began to wonder who is the man this tournament is named after, so I decided to do some research.
     
    Ken Kraft grew up in the small town of Sterling, Illinois about 115 miles due west of Chicago. He wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Famer Homer Musgrove. He qualified twice for the IHSA State Finals — once as a junior at 145 lbs. in 1952 and again in his senior year at 154 lbs. where he placed third.
     
    Following his graduation from Sterling in 1953, Ken enrolled at Northwestern University where he wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Fame Coach Jack Riley.
    Ken placed third in the Big Ten Tournament at 167 lbs. in 1956. In the following year he went on to capture the 167 lbs. Big Ten Title as well as finishing in the top six in the NCAA Wrestling Championships. However, being a student-athlete was literally just the beginning of Ken’s association with Northwestern.
     
    When Ken graduated from Northwestern in 1957 he took over as the Head Wrestling Coach — a position he would hold for the next 22 years. During his tenure as Head Coach the Wildcats had a dual meet record of 128-106-5. Eleven Conference Champions and fourteen All-Americans were produced under Ken Kraft’s tutelage, including two NCAA Champions — his brother Art at 157 lbs. in 1960 and Mark Massery at 126 lbs. in 1973. Twice Ken’s Wildcats finished in the top ten of the NCAA Championships.
     
    One of Ken’s greatest contributions to the sport of wrestling was the founding of the Midlands Championships in 1963. Exasperated with the long drive to wrestle in the only Christmas wrestling tourney in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Ken drew together a few close associates and established the Midlands Wrestling Tournament. The Midlands brings the very best in amateur wrestling to Northwestern’s Welsh-Ryan Arena every December between Christmas and New Years. In 2012, the Midlands, now known as the Ken Kraft Midlands, will commemorate its Golden Anniversary.
     
    Ken was part of the organizing committee of the United States Wrestling Federation (forerunner to USA Wrestling) and served on its Board from 1965 through 1980. Additionally, Ken served two terms as its President. In 1971 he was USA Team Leader for the World Championships. Ken also helped found the Mayor Daley Youth Foundation wrestling program. In 1970 he assumed the task of hosting and directing the NCAA Wrestling Championships at Northwestern. 1976 marked the year in which he presided over the dedication of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame — the same year he was named USWF’s Man of the Year. His depth of knowledge has led him to write numerous articles on the sport as well as an instructional text. For eighteen years Ken served as the wrestling expert for ABC’s Wide World of Sports as well as ESPN, Sports Channel and the Fox Sports Network. He also served as a “color” commentator for both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. In 1997 Ken was instrumental in forming the Illinois Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame; Ken currently resides on the Chapter Committee as Chairman Emeritus.
     
    The respect he commands from his peers has led to a number of honors. Ken has been inducted into the IWCOA Hall of Fame, 1973; has been named its Man of the Year, 2004; and received its Lifetime Achievement Award, 2001. The National Wrestling Hall of Fame bestowed Ken with its Order of Merit in 1996. In 1998 Ken was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as a Distinguished Member. In 2005, in recognition of Ken’s service and contributions to the sport and to the University, Northwestern designated its renovated wrestling area as The Ken Kraft Wrestling Complex. Ken described the facility as “…among the best in college wrestling.”
     
    Although “officially” retired, Ken continues to be involved with the Wildcat wrestling program and as a tournament administrator for the Ken Kraft Midlands Championships.
  23. Like
    rcoates1 reacted to MadMardigain in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    He cured my need for college wrestling during New Years weekend.
  24. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from denny in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    As I was watching the midlands I began to wonder who is the man this tournament is named after, so I decided to do some research.
     
    Ken Kraft grew up in the small town of Sterling, Illinois about 115 miles due west of Chicago. He wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Famer Homer Musgrove. He qualified twice for the IHSA State Finals — once as a junior at 145 lbs. in 1952 and again in his senior year at 154 lbs. where he placed third.
     
    Following his graduation from Sterling in 1953, Ken enrolled at Northwestern University where he wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Fame Coach Jack Riley.
    Ken placed third in the Big Ten Tournament at 167 lbs. in 1956. In the following year he went on to capture the 167 lbs. Big Ten Title as well as finishing in the top six in the NCAA Wrestling Championships. However, being a student-athlete was literally just the beginning of Ken’s association with Northwestern.
     
    When Ken graduated from Northwestern in 1957 he took over as the Head Wrestling Coach — a position he would hold for the next 22 years. During his tenure as Head Coach the Wildcats had a dual meet record of 128-106-5. Eleven Conference Champions and fourteen All-Americans were produced under Ken Kraft’s tutelage, including two NCAA Champions — his brother Art at 157 lbs. in 1960 and Mark Massery at 126 lbs. in 1973. Twice Ken’s Wildcats finished in the top ten of the NCAA Championships.
     
    One of Ken’s greatest contributions to the sport of wrestling was the founding of the Midlands Championships in 1963. Exasperated with the long drive to wrestle in the only Christmas wrestling tourney in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Ken drew together a few close associates and established the Midlands Wrestling Tournament. The Midlands brings the very best in amateur wrestling to Northwestern’s Welsh-Ryan Arena every December between Christmas and New Years. In 2012, the Midlands, now known as the Ken Kraft Midlands, will commemorate its Golden Anniversary.
     
    Ken was part of the organizing committee of the United States Wrestling Federation (forerunner to USA Wrestling) and served on its Board from 1965 through 1980. Additionally, Ken served two terms as its President. In 1971 he was USA Team Leader for the World Championships. Ken also helped found the Mayor Daley Youth Foundation wrestling program. In 1970 he assumed the task of hosting and directing the NCAA Wrestling Championships at Northwestern. 1976 marked the year in which he presided over the dedication of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame — the same year he was named USWF’s Man of the Year. His depth of knowledge has led him to write numerous articles on the sport as well as an instructional text. For eighteen years Ken served as the wrestling expert for ABC’s Wide World of Sports as well as ESPN, Sports Channel and the Fox Sports Network. He also served as a “color” commentator for both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. In 1997 Ken was instrumental in forming the Illinois Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame; Ken currently resides on the Chapter Committee as Chairman Emeritus.
     
    The respect he commands from his peers has led to a number of honors. Ken has been inducted into the IWCOA Hall of Fame, 1973; has been named its Man of the Year, 2004; and received its Lifetime Achievement Award, 2001. The National Wrestling Hall of Fame bestowed Ken with its Order of Merit in 1996. In 1998 Ken was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as a Distinguished Member. In 2005, in recognition of Ken’s service and contributions to the sport and to the University, Northwestern designated its renovated wrestling area as The Ken Kraft Wrestling Complex. Ken described the facility as “…among the best in college wrestling.”
     
    Although “officially” retired, Ken continues to be involved with the Wildcat wrestling program and as a tournament administrator for the Ken Kraft Midlands Championships.
  25. Like
    rcoates1 got a reaction from pjm46 in Who was Ken Kraft?   
    As I was watching the midlands I began to wonder who is the man this tournament is named after, so I decided to do some research.
     
    Ken Kraft grew up in the small town of Sterling, Illinois about 115 miles due west of Chicago. He wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Famer Homer Musgrove. He qualified twice for the IHSA State Finals — once as a junior at 145 lbs. in 1952 and again in his senior year at 154 lbs. where he placed third.
     
    Following his graduation from Sterling in 1953, Ken enrolled at Northwestern University where he wrestled for IWCOA Hall of Fame Coach Jack Riley.
    Ken placed third in the Big Ten Tournament at 167 lbs. in 1956. In the following year he went on to capture the 167 lbs. Big Ten Title as well as finishing in the top six in the NCAA Wrestling Championships. However, being a student-athlete was literally just the beginning of Ken’s association with Northwestern.
     
    When Ken graduated from Northwestern in 1957 he took over as the Head Wrestling Coach — a position he would hold for the next 22 years. During his tenure as Head Coach the Wildcats had a dual meet record of 128-106-5. Eleven Conference Champions and fourteen All-Americans were produced under Ken Kraft’s tutelage, including two NCAA Champions — his brother Art at 157 lbs. in 1960 and Mark Massery at 126 lbs. in 1973. Twice Ken’s Wildcats finished in the top ten of the NCAA Championships.
     
    One of Ken’s greatest contributions to the sport of wrestling was the founding of the Midlands Championships in 1963. Exasperated with the long drive to wrestle in the only Christmas wrestling tourney in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Ken drew together a few close associates and established the Midlands Wrestling Tournament. The Midlands brings the very best in amateur wrestling to Northwestern’s Welsh-Ryan Arena every December between Christmas and New Years. In 2012, the Midlands, now known as the Ken Kraft Midlands, will commemorate its Golden Anniversary.
     
    Ken was part of the organizing committee of the United States Wrestling Federation (forerunner to USA Wrestling) and served on its Board from 1965 through 1980. Additionally, Ken served two terms as its President. In 1971 he was USA Team Leader for the World Championships. Ken also helped found the Mayor Daley Youth Foundation wrestling program. In 1970 he assumed the task of hosting and directing the NCAA Wrestling Championships at Northwestern. 1976 marked the year in which he presided over the dedication of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame — the same year he was named USWF’s Man of the Year. His depth of knowledge has led him to write numerous articles on the sport as well as an instructional text. For eighteen years Ken served as the wrestling expert for ABC’s Wide World of Sports as well as ESPN, Sports Channel and the Fox Sports Network. He also served as a “color” commentator for both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. In 1997 Ken was instrumental in forming the Illinois Chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame; Ken currently resides on the Chapter Committee as Chairman Emeritus.
     
    The respect he commands from his peers has led to a number of honors. Ken has been inducted into the IWCOA Hall of Fame, 1973; has been named its Man of the Year, 2004; and received its Lifetime Achievement Award, 2001. The National Wrestling Hall of Fame bestowed Ken with its Order of Merit in 1996. In 1998 Ken was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as a Distinguished Member. In 2005, in recognition of Ken’s service and contributions to the sport and to the University, Northwestern designated its renovated wrestling area as The Ken Kraft Wrestling Complex. Ken described the facility as “…among the best in college wrestling.”
     
    Although “officially” retired, Ken continues to be involved with the Wildcat wrestling program and as a tournament administrator for the Ken Kraft Midlands Championships.
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