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iwrite

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  1. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from TheOhioState in Abe Lincoln wrestling artwork   
    For those of you who read the first Lincoln wrestling post, I thought you might want to see this beautiful artwork done by noted illustrator Jack Bender some 20 years ago. It shows Abe wrestling Jack Armstrong in New Salem, Illinois, in 1831. the event is an amazing story and was told Friday by author/historian Mike Chapman on the national radio show called Our American Stories, which has an audience estimated at close to 3 million. You can find it by going to the show's web site and searching in the archives.

  2. Sad
    iwrite reacted to russelscout in Abe Lincoln as a wrestler   
    I can't think of a better sport to prepare you for vampire slaying. 
  3. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from jross in Why Folk/Collegiate/Scholastic Style for The U.S.?   
    Totally agree with the posts above by D3UC157 and ironmonkey. They both make great points. Folkstyle wrestling evolved from catch-as-catch-can, which has been a part of the American sports culture for nearly 300 years. And from another standpoint, controlling a foe after he has been taken down is an essential part of being a martial art, which wrestling certainly is.  
  4. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from D3UC157 in Why Folk/Collegiate/Scholastic Style for The U.S.?   
    Totally agree with the posts above by D3UC157 and ironmonkey. They both make great points. Folkstyle wrestling evolved from catch-as-catch-can, which has been a part of the American sports culture for nearly 300 years. And from another standpoint, controlling a foe after he has been taken down is an essential part of being a martial art, which wrestling certainly is.  
  5. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from GockeS in Why Folk/Collegiate/Scholastic Style for The U.S.?   
    Totally agree with the posts above by D3UC157 and ironmonkey. They both make great points. Folkstyle wrestling evolved from catch-as-catch-can, which has been a part of the American sports culture for nearly 300 years. And from another standpoint, controlling a foe after he has been taken down is an essential part of being a martial art, which wrestling certainly is.  
  6. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from herma48852 in Lee Kemp   
    Force 118 and Peso -- I was in the Iowa room a lot during that time period as a sports writer for the Iowa City paper and knew both Joe Wells and Dan well. Joe was very, very tough, a guy who really loved the sport and all it stood for. We would sit and talk for hours back then, in the wrestling room and at a pub downtown. He was one of Gable's primary workout partners when Dan came to Iowa City to coach and Joe told me many times that working out with Gable was the toughest thing he had ever done.
    Regarding the Kemp-Gable match -- Dan had not competed for a long time and was suffering  from a pinched nerve in his neck the week before the tournament and even spent some time in traction in a hospital that same week. Several of his friends tried to talk him out of going to Madison but he felt he had to keep his commitment. He knew after the match that it was time to move on and focus entirely on coaching. Both Dan and Lee are true icons of the sport and deserve all the adulation that comes their way..
  7. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from BadgerMon in Greatest Hawkeyes ever, even if there was a fire!   
    Most stunning -- Lou Banach (who went 1, 3,1 in NCAA) weighing  about 215, pinning 400--pound Tab Thacker, pinning 250-pound Bruce Baumgartner, pinning 260-pound Steve "Dr.  Death" Williams, beating 395-pound Mitch Shelton, running over much larger Wayne Cole 3 times, and beating highly-favored Greg Gibson in the Olympic trials.
  8. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from GockeS in Greatest Hawkeyes ever, even if there was a fire!   
    Most stunning -- Lou Banach (who went 1, 3,1 in NCAA) weighing  about 215, pinning 400--pound Tab Thacker, pinning 250-pound Bruce Baumgartner, pinning 260-pound Steve "Dr.  Death" Williams, beating 395-pound Mitch Shelton, running over much larger Wayne Cole 3 times, and beating highly-favored Greg Gibson in the Olympic trials.
  9. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Bodyd in Greatest Hawkeyes ever, even if there was a fire!   
    Most stunning -- Lou Banach (who went 1, 3,1 in NCAA) weighing  about 215, pinning 400--pound Tab Thacker, pinning 250-pound Bruce Baumgartner, pinning 260-pound Steve "Dr.  Death" Williams, beating 395-pound Mitch Shelton, running over much larger Wayne Cole 3 times, and beating highly-favored Greg Gibson in the Olympic trials.
  10. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from airmail in Who were the greatest characters in the modern era?   
    Chuck Jean, 2-time NCAA champion at Iowa State who transferred to Adams State and won 2 NAIA titles, would get my vote, with Ray Brinzer second.
     
  11. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from MedicineMan in Who were the greatest characters in the modern era?   
    Doc -- thanks. The Chuck Jean stories are part of wrestling folklore, including the infamous deer roasting story. Chuck was a terror on the mat and a nice guy off the mat but could go off the rails from time to time. I have known both Chuck and Ray Brinzer for many years, and communicate with Ray regularly yet today. He is VERY intelligent  -- we talk more about philosophy and history than we do wrestling!
     
  12. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from Peso in Who were the greatest characters in the modern era?   
    Doc -- thanks. The Chuck Jean stories are part of wrestling folklore, including the infamous deer roasting story. Chuck was a terror on the mat and a nice guy off the mat but could go off the rails from time to time. I have known both Chuck and Ray Brinzer for many years, and communicate with Ray regularly yet today. He is VERY intelligent  -- we talk more about philosophy and history than we do wrestling!
     
  13. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from Peso in Who were the greatest characters in the modern era?   
    Chuck Jean, 2-time NCAA champion at Iowa State who transferred to Adams State and won 2 NAIA titles, would get my vote, with Ray Brinzer second.
     
  14. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from BadgerMon in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Ooops -- gotta add Doug Blubaugh to toughness, for sure! Ask anyone from his era -- like Wayne Baughman and Gray Simons and they will tell you!
    And BadgerMon has added some great names. AKHunter --  many years ago I was in a national sombo tournament with Wade (different weights) and he breezed into the finals where he faced a legendary black belt in judo. After a wild flurry, the black belt had Wade locked up tight in a behind-the-back arm lock and some were yelling for Wade to tap out. Instead, Wade initiated another wild flurry and suddenly he had the judo expert in the same hold...and made him tap out. It was one of the greatest displays of mental toughness and mat sense I have ever seen. And watching Mark Ironside for 4 years, I agree with Schute all the way.
     
     
  15. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from GockeS in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Fun topic -- talking folkstyle only!
    Takedowns -- John Smith, Randy Lewis, Uetake, Cael, Taylor (saw them all)
    Mat  -- Gable (24  straight pins at one point)  Hodge, Retherford, Lee (saw them all but Hodge)
    Leg -- Mike Sheets, Mark Churella, Cary Kolat
    Toughness --  Hodge, Gable, Tom Peckham, Wayne Baughman, Ed Banach, Mark Schultz, Tom & Terry Brands (saw them all but Hodge)
    Fireman's -- Tom Huff (if you ever saw him you know what I   mean), Dave Schultz
     
  16. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Katie in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Fun topic -- talking folkstyle only!
    Takedowns -- John Smith, Randy Lewis, Uetake, Cael, Taylor (saw them all)
    Mat  -- Gable (24  straight pins at one point)  Hodge, Retherford, Lee (saw them all but Hodge)
    Leg -- Mike Sheets, Mark Churella, Cary Kolat
    Toughness --  Hodge, Gable, Tom Peckham, Wayne Baughman, Ed Banach, Mark Schultz, Tom & Terry Brands (saw them all but Hodge)
    Fireman's -- Tom Huff (if you ever saw him you know what I   mean), Dave Schultz
     
  17. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Katie in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Ooops -- gotta add Doug Blubaugh to toughness, for sure! Ask anyone from his era -- like Wayne Baughman and Gray Simons and they will tell you!
    And BadgerMon has added some great names. AKHunter --  many years ago I was in a national sombo tournament with Wade (different weights) and he breezed into the finals where he faced a legendary black belt in judo. After a wild flurry, the black belt had Wade locked up tight in a behind-the-back arm lock and some were yelling for Wade to tap out. Instead, Wade initiated another wild flurry and suddenly he had the judo expert in the same hold...and made him tap out. It was one of the greatest displays of mental toughness and mat sense I have ever seen. And watching Mark Ironside for 4 years, I agree with Schute all the way.
     
     
  18. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from fadzaev2 in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Ooops -- gotta add Doug Blubaugh to toughness, for sure! Ask anyone from his era -- like Wayne Baughman and Gray Simons and they will tell you!
    And BadgerMon has added some great names. AKHunter --  many years ago I was in a national sombo tournament with Wade (different weights) and he breezed into the finals where he faced a legendary black belt in judo. After a wild flurry, the black belt had Wade locked up tight in a behind-the-back arm lock and some were yelling for Wade to tap out. Instead, Wade initiated another wild flurry and suddenly he had the judo expert in the same hold...and made him tap out. It was one of the greatest displays of mental toughness and mat sense I have ever seen. And watching Mark Ironside for 4 years, I agree with Schute all the way.
     
     
  19. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from ionel in Greatest wrestlers by areas of technique.   
    Fun topic -- talking folkstyle only!
    Takedowns -- John Smith, Randy Lewis, Uetake, Cael, Taylor (saw them all)
    Mat  -- Gable (24  straight pins at one point)  Hodge, Retherford, Lee (saw them all but Hodge)
    Leg -- Mike Sheets, Mark Churella, Cary Kolat
    Toughness --  Hodge, Gable, Tom Peckham, Wayne Baughman, Ed Banach, Mark Schultz, Tom & Terry Brands (saw them all but Hodge)
    Fireman's -- Tom Huff (if you ever saw him you know what I   mean), Dave Schultz
     
  20. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from jross in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    jross:
    Some people are asking outrageous prices for "Two Guys Named Dan", that's for sure. As an alternative, you might try my book "Legends of the Mat" as it has chapters on both Dans and also on Doug Blubaugh, Robin Reed,  Lee Kemp, John Smith, Bill Smith, Bruce Baumgartner, Mark & Dave Schultz, Ed & Lou Banach, Rulon Gardner and many others. It is much cheaper....34 legends in all. You can find it many places, including my web site -- www.mike-chapman.com
     
  21. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from vsnej in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    First, let me say this is a very interesting topic and I respect all of the opinions expressed. As an FYI, I have attended 47 NCAA tournaments and talked to most of the great coaches and champions from the 1950s-2000s in my journalism career. When Katie mentioned Frank Gotch, I thought of a comment in 1933 by Nat Fleischer, founder of The Ring magazine and the most respected boxing-wrestling writer of the first half of the 20th Century --- "It was Gotch's victories .... that made him the most popular mat star in America and started a movement among college men to take up wrestling." 
    Also, Paul Scott, coach of the 1947 Cornell College team that won the NCAA title; Dave McCuskey, coach of the 1950 Iowa Teachers team that won the NCAA title, and Dr. Harold Nichols, coach of the great Iowa State teams of the 1960s, all told me that it was Frank Gotch who they they admired most as young boys.
    Ed Gallagher had a tremendous impact on college wrestling during his career at Oklahoma A&M. He used to take long trips in the summer to Vermont to learn the techniques and tricks of the great collar-and-elbow stars and then put that knowledge to use  at Oklahoma A&M  to build one of the first true dynasties in college sports.
    Dan Hodge's impact has been immense for over 50 years. He is still the only wrestler to appear on the cover of Sports  Illustrated and the biggest trophy in college wrestling bears his name. He is the only athlete to ever win national titles in both boxing and wrestling and is an icon in the MMA world. For 20 years-plus, Dan traveled the nation to inspire young wrestlers. BTW, in 1956 he won the NCAA title, national freestyle and national G-R tournament, all with pins!
    Dan Gable took the sport to a new level as a pure freshman when he won the Midlands (when it was arguably the toughest meet in the nation) because the media began following him like no other wrestler since the days of Gotch back in 1910. He was featured in many of the nation's  major newspapers and magazines, including Sports Illustrated and even GQ magazine. He was the guest on several TV shows and film stars like Tom Cruise gushed over him. The Wall Street Journal called him "Super Wrestler" in an article and two books were written about him. 
    During his career at Iowa State, Gable drew huge crowds and at one point had 24 straight pins. He was 118-1 and defeated a total of 5 NCAA  champions, including three who were 2-timers!. His senior year he moved up a weight to take on the defending NCAA champion at 150, Mike Grant of Oklahoma, and beat him, 9-4.  Gable inspired so many young boys to take up the sport. President Bush even appointed Dan to the President's Council on Physical Fitness . ... showing his enduing impact on the sport.
    And Cael Sanderson -- can there be any debate?. Going 159-0 and being named OW 4 times and winning the Dan Hodge Trophy 3 times.. Sports Illustrated said his college performance is the second most impressive college feat in history, only behind Jesse Owens setting 4 world records in track on the same day for Ohio State.
    So, I agree with Gockes when he listed Ed Gallagher, Dan Hodge, Dan Gable and Cael Sanderson. And that is not to slight other great wrestlers like Pat Smith, Lee Kemp, Tom Brands and Kyle Dake. If the criteria was Americans in freestyle, then John Smith, Bruce Baumgartner, Mark and Dave Schultz, Lee Kemp, Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder all enter the conversation, IMO.
    Again, great topic. Keep it going!
     
  22. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Katie in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    Thanks, Katie. Speaking of folkstyle's early history, if you go on You Tube,  you can see videos of  Curran Jacobs, former Michigan State star (captain of the 2012 Spartan team and round of 12 at NCAA) showing catch wrestling moves. Also some of his great matches at the United World Catch Championships in 2018 when he defeated three much much larger wrestlers, all of whom had extensive submission backgrounds. Each match went about 30 minutes. Curran is undefeated in catch matches and also 5-0 in MMA, and has spent time with Randy Couture and Dan Severn discussing old -style wrestling. Then if you type in Curran's name and my name on the same line, you will see him in my den sitting in Frank Gotch's favorite chair, doing curls with a barbell given to me by Lou Thesz, and also trying to squeeze the headlock machine developed by Ed "Strangler" Lewis and owned for many years by Dan Hodge.  I have written 31 books, including biographies of Gotch, Hodge and the great Earl Caddock a legend from the 1915-1920 era -- Mike Chapman
  23. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from headache in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    First, let me say this is a very interesting topic and I respect all of the opinions expressed. As an FYI, I have attended 47 NCAA tournaments and talked to most of the great coaches and champions from the 1950s-2000s in my journalism career. When Katie mentioned Frank Gotch, I thought of a comment in 1933 by Nat Fleischer, founder of The Ring magazine and the most respected boxing-wrestling writer of the first half of the 20th Century --- "It was Gotch's victories .... that made him the most popular mat star in America and started a movement among college men to take up wrestling." 
    Also, Paul Scott, coach of the 1947 Cornell College team that won the NCAA title; Dave McCuskey, coach of the 1950 Iowa Teachers team that won the NCAA title, and Dr. Harold Nichols, coach of the great Iowa State teams of the 1960s, all told me that it was Frank Gotch who they they admired most as young boys.
    Ed Gallagher had a tremendous impact on college wrestling during his career at Oklahoma A&M. He used to take long trips in the summer to Vermont to learn the techniques and tricks of the great collar-and-elbow stars and then put that knowledge to use  at Oklahoma A&M  to build one of the first true dynasties in college sports.
    Dan Hodge's impact has been immense for over 50 years. He is still the only wrestler to appear on the cover of Sports  Illustrated and the biggest trophy in college wrestling bears his name. He is the only athlete to ever win national titles in both boxing and wrestling and is an icon in the MMA world. For 20 years-plus, Dan traveled the nation to inspire young wrestlers. BTW, in 1956 he won the NCAA title, national freestyle and national G-R tournament, all with pins!
    Dan Gable took the sport to a new level as a pure freshman when he won the Midlands (when it was arguably the toughest meet in the nation) because the media began following him like no other wrestler since the days of Gotch back in 1910. He was featured in many of the nation's  major newspapers and magazines, including Sports Illustrated and even GQ magazine. He was the guest on several TV shows and film stars like Tom Cruise gushed over him. The Wall Street Journal called him "Super Wrestler" in an article and two books were written about him. 
    During his career at Iowa State, Gable drew huge crowds and at one point had 24 straight pins. He was 118-1 and defeated a total of 5 NCAA  champions, including three who were 2-timers!. His senior year he moved up a weight to take on the defending NCAA champion at 150, Mike Grant of Oklahoma, and beat him, 9-4.  Gable inspired so many young boys to take up the sport. President Bush even appointed Dan to the President's Council on Physical Fitness . ... showing his enduing impact on the sport.
    And Cael Sanderson -- can there be any debate?. Going 159-0 and being named OW 4 times and winning the Dan Hodge Trophy 3 times.. Sports Illustrated said his college performance is the second most impressive college feat in history, only behind Jesse Owens setting 4 world records in track on the same day for Ohio State.
    So, I agree with Gockes when he listed Ed Gallagher, Dan Hodge, Dan Gable and Cael Sanderson. And that is not to slight other great wrestlers like Pat Smith, Lee Kemp, Tom Brands and Kyle Dake. If the criteria was Americans in freestyle, then John Smith, Bruce Baumgartner, Mark and Dave Schultz, Lee Kemp, Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder all enter the conversation, IMO.
    Again, great topic. Keep it going!
     
  24. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from cornercoach in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    First, let me say this is a very interesting topic and I respect all of the opinions expressed. As an FYI, I have attended 47 NCAA tournaments and talked to most of the great coaches and champions from the 1950s-2000s in my journalism career. When Katie mentioned Frank Gotch, I thought of a comment in 1933 by Nat Fleischer, founder of The Ring magazine and the most respected boxing-wrestling writer of the first half of the 20th Century --- "It was Gotch's victories .... that made him the most popular mat star in America and started a movement among college men to take up wrestling." 
    Also, Paul Scott, coach of the 1947 Cornell College team that won the NCAA title; Dave McCuskey, coach of the 1950 Iowa Teachers team that won the NCAA title, and Dr. Harold Nichols, coach of the great Iowa State teams of the 1960s, all told me that it was Frank Gotch who they they admired most as young boys.
    Ed Gallagher had a tremendous impact on college wrestling during his career at Oklahoma A&M. He used to take long trips in the summer to Vermont to learn the techniques and tricks of the great collar-and-elbow stars and then put that knowledge to use  at Oklahoma A&M  to build one of the first true dynasties in college sports.
    Dan Hodge's impact has been immense for over 50 years. He is still the only wrestler to appear on the cover of Sports  Illustrated and the biggest trophy in college wrestling bears his name. He is the only athlete to ever win national titles in both boxing and wrestling and is an icon in the MMA world. For 20 years-plus, Dan traveled the nation to inspire young wrestlers. BTW, in 1956 he won the NCAA title, national freestyle and national G-R tournament, all with pins!
    Dan Gable took the sport to a new level as a pure freshman when he won the Midlands (when it was arguably the toughest meet in the nation) because the media began following him like no other wrestler since the days of Gotch back in 1910. He was featured in many of the nation's  major newspapers and magazines, including Sports Illustrated and even GQ magazine. He was the guest on several TV shows and film stars like Tom Cruise gushed over him. The Wall Street Journal called him "Super Wrestler" in an article and two books were written about him. 
    During his career at Iowa State, Gable drew huge crowds and at one point had 24 straight pins. He was 118-1 and defeated a total of 5 NCAA  champions, including three who were 2-timers!. His senior year he moved up a weight to take on the defending NCAA champion at 150, Mike Grant of Oklahoma, and beat him, 9-4.  Gable inspired so many young boys to take up the sport. President Bush even appointed Dan to the President's Council on Physical Fitness . ... showing his enduing impact on the sport.
    And Cael Sanderson -- can there be any debate?. Going 159-0 and being named OW 4 times and winning the Dan Hodge Trophy 3 times.. Sports Illustrated said his college performance is the second most impressive college feat in history, only behind Jesse Owens setting 4 world records in track on the same day for Ohio State.
    So, I agree with Gockes when he listed Ed Gallagher, Dan Hodge, Dan Gable and Cael Sanderson. And that is not to slight other great wrestlers like Pat Smith, Lee Kemp, Tom Brands and Kyle Dake. If the criteria was Americans in freestyle, then John Smith, Bruce Baumgartner, Mark and Dave Schultz, Lee Kemp, Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder all enter the conversation, IMO.
    Again, great topic. Keep it going!
     
  25. Thanks
    iwrite got a reaction from jon in Who Would Be In Your Mount Rushmore for College Wrestling   
    First, let me say this is a very interesting topic and I respect all of the opinions expressed. As an FYI, I have attended 47 NCAA tournaments and talked to most of the great coaches and champions from the 1950s-2000s in my journalism career. When Katie mentioned Frank Gotch, I thought of a comment in 1933 by Nat Fleischer, founder of The Ring magazine and the most respected boxing-wrestling writer of the first half of the 20th Century --- "It was Gotch's victories .... that made him the most popular mat star in America and started a movement among college men to take up wrestling." 
    Also, Paul Scott, coach of the 1947 Cornell College team that won the NCAA title; Dave McCuskey, coach of the 1950 Iowa Teachers team that won the NCAA title, and Dr. Harold Nichols, coach of the great Iowa State teams of the 1960s, all told me that it was Frank Gotch who they they admired most as young boys.
    Ed Gallagher had a tremendous impact on college wrestling during his career at Oklahoma A&M. He used to take long trips in the summer to Vermont to learn the techniques and tricks of the great collar-and-elbow stars and then put that knowledge to use  at Oklahoma A&M  to build one of the first true dynasties in college sports.
    Dan Hodge's impact has been immense for over 50 years. He is still the only wrestler to appear on the cover of Sports  Illustrated and the biggest trophy in college wrestling bears his name. He is the only athlete to ever win national titles in both boxing and wrestling and is an icon in the MMA world. For 20 years-plus, Dan traveled the nation to inspire young wrestlers. BTW, in 1956 he won the NCAA title, national freestyle and national G-R tournament, all with pins!
    Dan Gable took the sport to a new level as a pure freshman when he won the Midlands (when it was arguably the toughest meet in the nation) because the media began following him like no other wrestler since the days of Gotch back in 1910. He was featured in many of the nation's  major newspapers and magazines, including Sports Illustrated and even GQ magazine. He was the guest on several TV shows and film stars like Tom Cruise gushed over him. The Wall Street Journal called him "Super Wrestler" in an article and two books were written about him. 
    During his career at Iowa State, Gable drew huge crowds and at one point had 24 straight pins. He was 118-1 and defeated a total of 5 NCAA  champions, including three who were 2-timers!. His senior year he moved up a weight to take on the defending NCAA champion at 150, Mike Grant of Oklahoma, and beat him, 9-4.  Gable inspired so many young boys to take up the sport. President Bush even appointed Dan to the President's Council on Physical Fitness . ... showing his enduing impact on the sport.
    And Cael Sanderson -- can there be any debate?. Going 159-0 and being named OW 4 times and winning the Dan Hodge Trophy 3 times.. Sports Illustrated said his college performance is the second most impressive college feat in history, only behind Jesse Owens setting 4 world records in track on the same day for Ohio State.
    So, I agree with Gockes when he listed Ed Gallagher, Dan Hodge, Dan Gable and Cael Sanderson. And that is not to slight other great wrestlers like Pat Smith, Lee Kemp, Tom Brands and Kyle Dake. If the criteria was Americans in freestyle, then John Smith, Bruce Baumgartner, Mark and Dave Schultz, Lee Kemp, Jordan Burroughs and Kyle Snyder all enter the conversation, IMO.
    Again, great topic. Keep it going!
     
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