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iwrite

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  1. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from rcoates1 in Biggest barrier to Retherford winning Hodge   
    As a pure freshman, Gable won the 1966 Midlands by beating Don Behm (a very good senior that year) of Michigan State 10-5 in the semifinals  and then beating Masaaki Hatta in the finals, 8-3. Hatta was a two-time Midlands champion and a former NCAA champion for Oklahoma State. Gable was 17-0 as a freshman but they were not allowed to compete for the team. As a sophomore Gable beat the defending NCAA champion, Dave McGuire, twice, 8-2 in the Big 8 meet and 4-1 in the NCAA 130-pound finals. McGuire won again at 130 the next season, finishing 1-2-1 in the NCAAs. As a junior, Gable was 31-0 with 29 pins, including 24 in a row to break Dan Hodge's NCAA record of 22 in a row. Gable pinned  his way through the NCAA that year to win at 137 pounds. Gable defeated 5 NCAA champions during his college career and finished 117-1. He won the Midlands all 4 years he was in college (and was named O.W. all four years) and it was probably the toughest tournament in the nation then because so many post-graduates competed.
  2. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from PhiferFuqua in Biggest barrier to Retherford winning Hodge   
    Billyhoyle:  Gable took a winning streak of 180 (high school and college combined) into the 1970 NCAA finals at 142 pounds at Northwestern University and lost to Larry Owings, 13-11, in one of the most exciting matches in college history. I was there in press row. After the match, the arena came to a dead halt. People were stunned. Owings did a sensational job, both mentally and physically, and deserves all the credit. He was a great wrestler and finished 1-2-2 in his three NCAAs. Both Larry and Dan pinned their way to the finals, with 5 each. BTW, earlier in the season, Gable had moved up a weight from 142 to take on the defending NCAA 150-pound champion, Mike Grant of Oklahoma, and beat him 9-5 in a dual meet in Oklahoma. At Northwestern, Grant repeated as champion at 150.
  3. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Flying-Tiger in Biggest barrier to Retherford winning Hodge   
    As a pure freshman, Gable won the 1966 Midlands by beating Don Behm (a very good senior that year) of Michigan State 10-5 in the semifinals  and then beating Masaaki Hatta in the finals, 8-3. Hatta was a two-time Midlands champion and a former NCAA champion for Oklahoma State. Gable was 17-0 as a freshman but they were not allowed to compete for the team. As a sophomore Gable beat the defending NCAA champion, Dave McGuire, twice, 8-2 in the Big 8 meet and 4-1 in the NCAA 130-pound finals. McGuire won again at 130 the next season, finishing 1-2-1 in the NCAAs. As a junior, Gable was 31-0 with 29 pins, including 24 in a row to break Dan Hodge's NCAA record of 22 in a row. Gable pinned  his way through the NCAA that year to win at 137 pounds. Gable defeated 5 NCAA champions during his college career and finished 117-1. He won the Midlands all 4 years he was in college (and was named O.W. all four years) and it was probably the toughest tournament in the nation then because so many post-graduates competed.
  4. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from JBluegill133 in Hodge Trophy Contenders (link)   
    Good idea, Hurricane: When I came up with the idea of a special award for college wrestling, I contacted Dan Hodge, the legendary 3-time undefeated NCAA champion at Oklahoma U., to get his permission and he was very honored to have his name used in such fashion. For the first several years, I announced the winner after receiving votes from Dan Hodge and a group of a dozen or so retired college coaches and college wrestling experts.
     
    After selling WIN magazine to Bryan Van Kley in 1998, WIN magazine and my marketing company called Culture House became co-presenters of the Hodge Trophy and Bryan also became a voter. Several years later, we developed a larger committee from all regions of the country, along with all former Hodge Trophy winners and an expanded panel of wrestling journalists, as well as representatives of several of the top national wrestling organizations such as the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, USA Wrestling, the AAU, NUWAY, the NHSCA and the NWCA.
     
    Then ASICS came aboard as the exclusive corporate sponsor in 2012 and also was given voting privileges. As the Hodge Trophy became more and more prominent and widely recognized, we expanded the selection process by asking fans to vote. This past year, there were over 23,000 unique votes cast via the internet the week after the NCAA tournament.
     
    When Zain Retherford received his Hodge Trophy this fall at a Penn State football game, Mike Finn, editor of WIN, wrote the following:  “It was inspiring to see the two-time NCAA champion raise the trophy above his head while over 100,000 Nittany Lion fans honored him with cheers. But an even bigger highlight happened when (Retherford) left the football field while countless Nittany Lion fans literally reached out to touch him. Walking behind the 149-pounder, I could see the joy in the faces of fellow college students, many of whom had never met Retherford before that night.”
     
    That has been a familiar occurrence for over two decades ... huge crowds at football games honoring the Dan Hodge Trophy winners and helping create more interest in the sport.
     
    As a side note  -- when we honored Nick Ackerman as a co-winner, it was at the strong urging of two Olympic champions, both of whom felt deeply that such an athletic performance should be recognized. I talked to Dan Hodge and his wife, Dolores, and both were very firm in supporting that move. As a close friend once told me, if you are going to make a tough call, always make it on the side of being gracious. That's what we tried to do in that case.
  5. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from BigTenFanboy in Hodge Trophy Contenders (link)   
    Good idea, Hurricane: When I came up with the idea of a special award for college wrestling, I contacted Dan Hodge, the legendary 3-time undefeated NCAA champion at Oklahoma U., to get his permission and he was very honored to have his name used in such fashion. For the first several years, I announced the winner after receiving votes from Dan Hodge and a group of a dozen or so retired college coaches and college wrestling experts.
     
    After selling WIN magazine to Bryan Van Kley in 1998, WIN magazine and my marketing company called Culture House became co-presenters of the Hodge Trophy and Bryan also became a voter. Several years later, we developed a larger committee from all regions of the country, along with all former Hodge Trophy winners and an expanded panel of wrestling journalists, as well as representatives of several of the top national wrestling organizations such as the National Wrestling Hall of Fame, USA Wrestling, the AAU, NUWAY, the NHSCA and the NWCA.
     
    Then ASICS came aboard as the exclusive corporate sponsor in 2012 and also was given voting privileges. As the Hodge Trophy became more and more prominent and widely recognized, we expanded the selection process by asking fans to vote. This past year, there were over 23,000 unique votes cast via the internet the week after the NCAA tournament.
     
    When Zain Retherford received his Hodge Trophy this fall at a Penn State football game, Mike Finn, editor of WIN, wrote the following:  “It was inspiring to see the two-time NCAA champion raise the trophy above his head while over 100,000 Nittany Lion fans honored him with cheers. But an even bigger highlight happened when (Retherford) left the football field while countless Nittany Lion fans literally reached out to touch him. Walking behind the 149-pounder, I could see the joy in the faces of fellow college students, many of whom had never met Retherford before that night.”
     
    That has been a familiar occurrence for over two decades ... huge crowds at football games honoring the Dan Hodge Trophy winners and helping create more interest in the sport.
     
    As a side note  -- when we honored Nick Ackerman as a co-winner, it was at the strong urging of two Olympic champions, both of whom felt deeply that such an athletic performance should be recognized. I talked to Dan Hodge and his wife, Dolores, and both were very firm in supporting that move. As a close friend once told me, if you are going to make a tough call, always make it on the side of being gracious. That's what we tried to do in that case.
  6. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Gantry in Hodge Trophy Contenders (link)   
    It's interesting to read all these comments. I created the Hodge Trophy in 1995 with two main purposes -- to put more emphasis on the pin and to create more public attention for the sport. The award may not be perfect in the way it is voted on and who wins it, but it has certainly been successful in its two main goals.  Nearly one million fans have seen the Hodge Trophy presented in person, at the annual wrestling banquet and again that fall at a football game. Some of the sports information offices at the various schools where wrestlers are in contention for the award have posted videos and sent out press releases, both before and after the voting. Many of the winners have said that winning the Hodge Trophy was one of their top goals upon entering college. Various members of the media, including the AP, call it "the Heisman Trophy of wrestling" and when I have the trophy on display at the WIN Show and various other events I go to, high school wrestlers and coaches are very excited to see it and many ask to have their photos taken with it. In addition, one of the finest companies that supports wrestling, Asics, thinks enough of the award to become the presenting sponsor. Sure, fans can debate all day if certain wrestlers should have won -- just like with the major league MVP awards or the Heisman -- but I firmly believe the top two goals in creating the Hodge Trophy have been accomplished. -- Mike Chapman
  7. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from BigTenFanboy in Hodge Trophy Contenders (link)   
    It's interesting to read all these comments. I created the Hodge Trophy in 1995 with two main purposes -- to put more emphasis on the pin and to create more public attention for the sport. The award may not be perfect in the way it is voted on and who wins it, but it has certainly been successful in its two main goals.  Nearly one million fans have seen the Hodge Trophy presented in person, at the annual wrestling banquet and again that fall at a football game. Some of the sports information offices at the various schools where wrestlers are in contention for the award have posted videos and sent out press releases, both before and after the voting. Many of the winners have said that winning the Hodge Trophy was one of their top goals upon entering college. Various members of the media, including the AP, call it "the Heisman Trophy of wrestling" and when I have the trophy on display at the WIN Show and various other events I go to, high school wrestlers and coaches are very excited to see it and many ask to have their photos taken with it. In addition, one of the finest companies that supports wrestling, Asics, thinks enough of the award to become the presenting sponsor. Sure, fans can debate all day if certain wrestlers should have won -- just like with the major league MVP awards or the Heisman -- but I firmly believe the top two goals in creating the Hodge Trophy have been accomplished. -- Mike Chapman
  8. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from Buckxell in Strength/power feats of our elite athletes   
    Many years ago, I saw Mark Johnson, a member of the 1980 Greco-Roman Olympic team and two-time NCAA runnerup at Michigan, curl 250 pounds for 10 reps,using only a slight back bend. He weighed about 195 at the time and the national magazine Strength & Health printed a story about Mark doing that. Also, Mike Chapman, the guy who writes books about wrestling and who created WIN magazine and the Dan Hodge Trophy, bench pressed 330 pounds while on his neck in a wrestler's bridge. (He could do 440 on a flat bench at the time, weighting 205). Chapman said he was inspired to do the wrestler's bridge lift after reading a story of George Hackenschmidt, known as The Russian Lion, doing that back in 1910.
     
  9. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from GoNotQuietly in Strength/power feats of our elite athletes   
    Many years ago, I saw Mark Johnson, a member of the 1980 Greco-Roman Olympic team and two-time NCAA runnerup at Michigan, curl 250 pounds for 10 reps,using only a slight back bend. He weighed about 195 at the time and the national magazine Strength & Health printed a story about Mark doing that. Also, Mike Chapman, the guy who writes books about wrestling and who created WIN magazine and the Dan Hodge Trophy, bench pressed 330 pounds while on his neck in a wrestler's bridge. (He could do 440 on a flat bench at the time, weighting 205). Chapman said he was inspired to do the wrestler's bridge lift after reading a story of George Hackenschmidt, known as The Russian Lion, doing that back in 1910.
     
  10. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from whaletail in USA All-Time Ranking Update   
    There was very little money to be made in amateur wrestling when Gable won the World and Olympics back to back, without a close match. The only way to make "real" money was to go into coaching, which he did at age 24. In the 1972 Olympic regional trials in Iowa City,he won all 6 matches by pin but outscored the six foes 120-1 before pinning them. In the final trials in Anoka, MN, he went 7-0, giving up just one point.  In his final 2 matches, Dan beat Lloyd Keaser 22-0 and 11-0 (and a year later, Lloyd was world champion). Then in the 1972 Olympics Gable gave up zero points in his 6 matches.  That means in his last 19 matches against the best wrestlers in the U.S. and the world, he  gave up two points. A year later, he was lured out of retirement to wrestle the Soviet Union's best at his weight, Pavel Pinigan, and Dan beat him 12-2 in Madison Square Garden. Dan simply had no incentive to keep wrestling with two back-to-back world titles and very little financial reward. It was years later before an American wrestler could make some decent money by staying in the sport... which was a big step forward in keeping our best wrestlers like Bruce and John in competition.
  11. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from OKnowwhut in USA All-Time Ranking Update   
    There was very little money to be made in amateur wrestling when Gable won the World and Olympics back to back, without a close match. The only way to make "real" money was to go into coaching, which he did at age 24. In the 1972 Olympic regional trials in Iowa City,he won all 6 matches by pin but outscored the six foes 120-1 before pinning them. In the final trials in Anoka, MN, he went 7-0, giving up just one point.  In his final 2 matches, Dan beat Lloyd Keaser 22-0 and 11-0 (and a year later, Lloyd was world champion). Then in the 1972 Olympics Gable gave up zero points in his 6 matches.  That means in his last 19 matches against the best wrestlers in the U.S. and the world, he  gave up two points. A year later, he was lured out of retirement to wrestle the Soviet Union's best at his weight, Pavel Pinigan, and Dan beat him 12-2 in Madison Square Garden. Dan simply had no incentive to keep wrestling with two back-to-back world titles and very little financial reward. It was years later before an American wrestler could make some decent money by staying in the sport... which was a big step forward in keeping our best wrestlers like Bruce and John in competition.
  12. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from BadgerMon in USA All-Time Ranking Update   
    There was very little money to be made in amateur wrestling when Gable won the World and Olympics back to back, without a close match. The only way to make "real" money was to go into coaching, which he did at age 24. In the 1972 Olympic regional trials in Iowa City,he won all 6 matches by pin but outscored the six foes 120-1 before pinning them. In the final trials in Anoka, MN, he went 7-0, giving up just one point.  In his final 2 matches, Dan beat Lloyd Keaser 22-0 and 11-0 (and a year later, Lloyd was world champion). Then in the 1972 Olympics Gable gave up zero points in his 6 matches.  That means in his last 19 matches against the best wrestlers in the U.S. and the world, he  gave up two points. A year later, he was lured out of retirement to wrestle the Soviet Union's best at his weight, Pavel Pinigan, and Dan beat him 12-2 in Madison Square Garden. Dan simply had no incentive to keep wrestling with two back-to-back world titles and very little financial reward. It was years later before an American wrestler could make some decent money by staying in the sport... which was a big step forward in keeping our best wrestlers like Bruce and John in competition.
  13. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from pjm46 in USA All-Time Ranking Update   
    Good points, pjm46. Gable was a media darling in 1972 . He was on 3 popular TV shows of the era -- "To Tell the Truth", "The Dick Cavett Show" and "The Superstars". He also was the subject of two books (one by Russ Smith called "THE Legend" and one by Mike Chapman called "Two Guys named Dan") and was featured in Frank Gifford's popular book, "Gifford on Courage". Gable was talked about frequently in several forms of media at the time, even on Monday Night Football occasionally. Then his coaching career kept his name in the public view for another 2 decades. Media attention took him to another level.
  14. Like
    iwrite got a reaction from DAA in Question for you ex-college wrestlers   
    Dale Anderson's transfer to Michigan State in the late 1960s is one of the most important transfers in college history, as it was a huge factor in the Spartans winning the NCAA team title in 1967 -- the first Big Ten school with that distinction.. I highly recommend Dale's book about that magical year. By the way, this year marks the 50th anniversary of that important event. -- Mike Chapman, author of 29 books and creator of WIN magazine and the Dan Hodge Trophy
  15. Like
    iwrite reacted to iwrite in Question for you ex-college wrestlers   
    Dale Anderson's transfer to Michigan State in the late 1960s is one of the most important transfers in college history, as it was a huge factor in the Spartans winning the NCAA team title in 1967 -- the first Big Ten school with that distinction.. I highly recommend Dale's book about that magical year. By the way, this year marks the 50th anniversary of that important event. -- Mike Chapman, author of 29 books and creator of WIN magazine and the Dan Hodge Trophy
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