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fightingsioux

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  1. fightingsioux

    Jr. Worlds Womens Most Impressive

    It's got to be related in some way to Judo or even martial arts in general. They have such heavy hips, just immovable at times. Though things are slowly changing, US women come from a background of other sports while the Japanese women come from a Judo culture.
  2. fightingsioux

    Coaching

    He's exactly right, just what I'm saying. Human beings learn things from the bottom up: the simplest bit of knowledge or action, then another, then another as the structure gets more and more elaborate. An expert in nuclear physics or cross-country skiing could learn a complicated new theory or technique in a short amount of time, while I--who know nothing about either--might take all day understanding what an atom is or how to put on my boots! Keep it simple. Drill, practice, repeat over and over again. Try it in a mini-match in the room. Try it in a real match. Eventually, if the young wrestler likes the move/series and can execute the move/series effectively, he or she will make it their own. Then on to the next. Best of luck!
  3. fightingsioux

    Coaching

    We're probably saying the same thing, although instead of "series" I would say "moves", and instead of "position" I would say "situation." In other words, both wrestlers are on their feet, moving in and out, circling, whatever. A standard takedown situation (or position). You're first making sure that their feet, legs, hips, upper body, arms are ready for attack and defense. They simply practice circling, feinting, half-shots, light sprawls, etc., in a smooth and natural manner. Beginners just need to learn how to move around the mat correctly. All this will depend tremendously on how advanced the wrestlers are, but if you're saying that in general your team has low skills, then the repetition of basic drills will help everyone: learning for the real rookies, practice for the better guys. This type of drilling will probably go on all season, when you're warming-up for a match, etc. You can't do too much of it, elite wrestlers do it their entire careers. Pick two or three basic, standard takedowns from the many available, keeping it simple: a double-leg, a single-leg, an ankle pick, a duck-under, an arm drag, many more. Demonstrate, pair the guys up and have them learn and practice. Keep at it, it takes a long while. Eventually, beginning wrestlers will pick what works best for them and make it their own. Better for someone to know one move very well, like second nature, and be able to use it smoothly and effectively in a live situation than to half-know ten moves, the attempt at which will only get them into trouble. The same for all the other standard positions or situations, whatever word you use. Teach two or three basic rides, no more, all of which should transition into basic pinning combinations. Resist the urge to get too fancy! Keep it simple. Teach two or three basic reversals: an outside switch, an inside switch, a whizzer, many more choices available. Two or three basic escapes: a stand-up, a Granby roll, etc. Don't try to teach too many and don't overload them with ultra-sophisticated advanced stuff! It will only get them into trouble. Again, a beginning wrestler will always gravitate towards what works for them and eventually perfect that. Jordan Burroughs uses a double-leg and Kyle Snyder uses an ankle pick that both probably learned in grade school! As I said in my first reply, all this must be accompanied by work on general fitness and somehow must be kept FUN! That's tough to do. Show them as much film as you can. Have them go to as many live matches as they can. These days action movies and video games are certainly attention-grabbers, but you've never seen a person more enthralled and almost hypnotized as a beginning middle school or freshman wrestler at a college meet! There are many, many experienced wrestlers and coaches on this site and others who will be glad to help.
  4. fightingsioux

    Coaching

    What else is there to say: the basics. Start teaching a few of the basic takedowns, a few rides, a few escapes and reversals, a few pinning combinations and how to counter them. Two or three of each category, no more. Drill, drill, drill. Then drill some more. Keep trying to raise their fitness level: plenty of books and videos on that. Perhaps hardest of all: make all of the above fun. Lots of games, contests, etc. One of the things that many coaches, schools and even communities don't realize is that there's a huge difference between a team and a program. To have consistently good teams you need a solid program, and that takes decades. It's a long haul, my friend. Best of luck!
  5. fightingsioux

    Most anticipated wrestlers

    Correct. A big unknown and topic of much speculation for tOSU fans. Word is he's 100% fit and rarin' to go, and of course there might be something to someone's "pedigree", I don't know. Anyway, will be interesting.
  6. fightingsioux

    Most anticipated wrestlers

    Yes, for 2020-2021 Singletary will go to 197, with Kerkvliet at heavy. However, if tOSU can land Braxton Amos, and if he doesn't shirt (a lot of ifs, I know!) 197 might also be crowded. I'm old. Very old :-). Back in the stone age when I wrestled in HS & college, the heavyweight match was usually a boring, almost laughable pushing and shoving contest between two unskilled, out-of-shape, grossly obese guys. Very common to see knowledgeable fans just filing out of the gym beforehand. Yes, there were exceptions, but I'm talking for the most part. So glad that's over and done. Some of these new heavies wrestle like 125 pounders! I agree with you, 2020-2021 should be awesome.
  7. fightingsioux

    Dake-Dieringer live thread

    Boxing, judo, taekwondo--also just one person per weight. Seems to be a combat sports thing?
  8. fightingsioux

    World Medalists should get a bye to the US Open Finals

    Had to think about that one for a bit (one beer too many) but it makes sense. Good point.
  9. fightingsioux

    World Medalists should get a bye to the US Open Finals

    Wonder why they changed from two last chance qualifier tournaments available in 2012 & 2016 to just one in 2020?
  10. fightingsioux

    Most anticipated wrestlers

    Ragu: Great list, very interesting concept. A couple of minor observations: As a tOSU fan, I pay closer attention to them off-season. Gavin Hoffman is indeed a beast at 184 and a future AA, but he's going to have his hands full with the latest Jordan, Rocky. Going to be a hell of a wrestle-off. Don't think he can cut to 174, and he's sure not going up to 197 to challenge Moore. nhs67: Tom Ryan has all but confirmed that Kerkvliet will redshirt at heavy. That leaves Singletary as the starter, not that he was going to successfully take the 197 spot from Moore. My totally-insane-admitted-homer prediction: Sasso wins it all at 149!
  11. fightingsioux

    Iran Wrestling News

    I agree with you, as I think do most of the other people on this site. It's not good for lawyers., arbitrators, etc., to get involved. Nobody wants to see that. I understand what you're saying about the situation in Iran. However, just wondering, if a wrestler or their coach feels that there has been an extreme miscarriage of justice, is there any appeals process?
  12. fightingsioux

    Dake-Dieringer live thread

    Of course, if DT is healthy. All day, every day!
  13. fightingsioux

    Dake-Dieringer live thread

    If you're saying that you were being sarcastic with your original Cornell post, well, yes I missed it. A sarcastic tone of voice is awfully hard to get across on the printed page. I was just kidding around about Harvard wrestling. No biggie, peace.
  14. fightingsioux

    Dake-Dieringer live thread

    It was a joke. See the smile? Sheesh.
  15. fightingsioux

    Dake-Dieringer live thread

    Maybe, but then why isn't Harvard 100X NCAA team champion? :-)
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