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Cam Tessari

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New to the TheMat, but both my sons loved watching Cam in high school and at Ohio State.  Glad to see him back on the mat anywhere wrestling.  He was always one of my favorites to watch.  Will be interesting to see if he's still got the moves.  If you're reading this Cam, good luck to you and hope you've found the right spot.  Hope we get to see you some time! 

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He spent two years out of school working in construction.  He was ready to get back to school and wrestling when Lindsey Wilson called.  The coach understands kids like Cam and they have a great rapport.  He's doing well in class and working very hard in the room.  By all accounts he's happy and grateful for this opportunity.

 

Cam Tessari is a good kid and a terrific talent who was not ready for combination of academics, athletics and the freedom of a college campus when he finished high school.  He's more mature now.  Wishing him the best.

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It's a shame that our educational system doesn't provide an avenue for athletes that are not suited for mainstream academics. Back in the '80s, Oklahoma had a really good 190 lber who wanted to be a mechanic. He simply was not suited for nor had the motivation to obtain an academic degree. He completed his elegibility, was I think a two time AA, and went to work at a transmission shop. His educational experience certainly could have been enhanced had he been able to pursue his personal interests in a votech setting rather than being stuck in a traditional academic degree program.

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It's a shame that our educational system doesn't provide an avenue for athletes that are not suited for mainstream academics. Back in the '80s, Oklahoma had a really good 190 lber who wanted to be a mechanic. He simply was not suited for nor had the motivation to obtain an academic degree. He completed his elegibility, was I think a two time AA, and went to work at a transmission shop. His educational experience certainly could have been enhanced had he been able to pursue his personal interests in a votech setting rather than being stuck in a traditional academic degree program.

Other divisions and associations do that. Division-I is not the option.

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It's a shame that our educational system doesn't provide an avenue for athletes that are not suited for mainstream academics. Back in the '80s, Oklahoma had a really good 190 lber who wanted to be a mechanic. He simply was not suited for nor had the motivation to obtain an academic degree. He completed his elegibility, was I think a two time AA, and went to work at a transmission shop. His educational experience certainly could have been enhanced had he been able to pursue his personal interests in a votech setting rather than being stuck in a traditional academic degree program.

 

There is a reason they are called student-athletes and that the experience is subsidized by state and federal tax dollars. Some people might think that tax dollars should go to funding a given person's desire to continue to pursue athletic endeavors at non-Olympic levels but for my nickel, I would want my tax money to go for a student's education because society might actually get something back on that deal.  

 

A kid doesn't have to go to college to wrestle - he/she can wrestling in the international style open meets like the regional qualifiers. But if they want to be part of the organized folkstyle system then the path is clear - be a student first - because that is what the system exists. Additionally, there are a lot of club programs out there these days that are a path to wrestling while not being a student.

 

And before one cites football and basketball as exceptions, please know that collegiate wrestling is not NCAA football or basketball - but that's a whole 'nother discussion.

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Are people who choose to study electronics, vehicle repair, plumbing or construction trades not students? If an athlete decides to attend a D I school and major in one of the so called "gimme degrees" any more a student than the kid studying auto mechanics at the local Vo-Tech? Is a youngster whose aptitude lies in hands on endeavors rather than pseudo intellectual pursuits any less deserving of state and federal tax subsidies?

 

I would much rather see a young person who has athletic skills be able to exchange them for an education that will actually be useful to them as an adult than to be guided into a system where they will be put onto a path that will not be beneficial to the student athlete or the tax paying public. Football season is starting and when they are announcing the starting line ups, take note of the players that are majoring in the "gimmes". Would not the interest of the student amd the public be better served by offering them a course of studies more suited to their aptitudes and abilities?

 

If we are going to continue the use of the term student athlete then why not include all students. The traditional college curriculum does not necessarily serve the best interests of the parties involved in NCAA Athletics whether they are the athletes or any other interested party.

Edited by Bloate

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Bloate:  You are spot on.  Kinesiology is my personal fave.  Heard of it about five years ago.  Maybe it's a real science but sure seems like athletes with no real educational drive are always studying it.  

Edited by silver-medal

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Are people who choose to study electronics, vehicle repair, plumbing or construction trades not students? If an athlete decides to attend a D I school and major in one of the so called "gimme degrees" any more a student than the kid studying auto mechanics at the local Vo-Tech? Is a youngster whose aptitude lies in hands on endeavors rather than pseudo intellectual pursuits any less deserving of state and federal tax subsidies?

 

I would much rather see a young person who has athletic skills be able to exchange them for an education that will actually be useful to them as an adult than to be guided into a system where they will be put onto a path that will not be beneficial to the student athlete or the tax paying public. Football season is starting and when they are announcing the starting line ups, take note of the players that are majoring in the "gimmes". Would not the interest of the student amd the public be better served by offering them a course of studies more suited to their aptitudes and abilities?

 

If we are going to continue the use of the term student athlete then why not include all students. The traditional college curriculum does not necessarily serve the best interests of the parties involved in NCAA Athletics whether they are the athletes or any other interested party.

There are plenty of schools that offer training to be your standard mechanic, plumber, electrician, exterminator, etc...They are trade schools, just like law school, medical school, dental school, pharmaceutical school are also in a way trade schools (although these require an undergraduate degree first).  The standard undergraduate bachelors degree that you see isn't designed for somebody immediately ready to go to work as a laborer, practicing a trade in the fields previously described.  There's nothing wrong with wanting to do that as your career, and the people who choose to do so are awesome for society, etc.

 

The reason we have our university system though is to find people who are going to innovate/put people in a creative environment with many different options.  That's why you see really basic subjects as the general focus, such as Economics, English, History, (any language), Physics, XYZ Engineering, etc.  People don't use 90% of these classes in their careers, but the basic skills acquired from studying them are then applied to whatever field people go off into.  With that said, this isn't the only way to get talented/creative people, since many of the best innovators in history have skipped the university system entirely or dropped out once they knew what they wanted to do.  Many others benefit from going through this process though.  

 

So, you are right that universities don't serve people who already know that they want to do a particular trade which doesn't require a higher education. But the reason they don't serve them is exactly because such an education is not required for their field...Unless we want our plumbers to start having literature degrees.  

 

You are spot on though that the way universities get around having athletes participate at their school is a joke. I don't think the solution is to offer them degrees in a particular trade, but rather make them actually earn a real degree.  If that means some of the best football players have to go NAIA, so be it.  

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You have outlined the problem. The system, at least in NCAA institutions, do not provide a vocational approach to education. As far as an educational philosophy I have no problem with that; students who study the Core Cirriculum, as it's called at Columbia, benefit society in many ways not hands on related.

 

The problem lies in the adoption of big time athletics by universities. Because of several factors, mostly the enormous amount of revenue generated by today's athletes, the schools recruit young people who would in reality be more suited to an alternative educational program. Public pressure has required the NCAA to require minimum stamdards such as minimum entrance test scores and grade point averages. However these standards are minimal and often assisted by cooperating professors and puffy majors. The most glaring example I can think of is OkS graduate and all pro football player Dexter Manley. 12 years of public education and 4 years of college and the man could not read above a 4th grade level. Had he been an average athlete, the only benefit he would have derived from his educational experience is 4 years room and board.

 

We as fans want to watch elite level athletes compete at the highest level. Not many of the people who participate on this forum want an elite wrestler to either go to an NAIA school or skip folk style altogether and go directly to International style wrestling. We spend and donate money to our favorite school in an effort to either raise or keep them at the top of intercollegiate athletics and in doing so support the current educational system. How many of us would have known about Cale Sanderson, John Smith, etc. if they had decided to study at an NAIA institution?

 

Thanks to all for putting up with my bloviating. I sometimes get carried away when I observe something that needs fixing and there seems to be a simple solution but for whatever reason is allowed to continue festering.

 

PS. I am an OkS fan and am in no way picking on them by citing the Dexter Manley situation. Abuses and failure by colleges all,over this country to put the student athlete's interest first are well documented.

Edited by Bloate

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Completely agree with you that the system is broken in the revenue sports.  It's even more of a shame that the solution people want is to pay the athletes, rather than actually provide them an education.  When you think about how much money these teams make from adults who live off of the success of  a college football team, and how many students (not the athletes, just the average student) go to a school because of the quality of the football team (instead of the education), you start to think that the universities themselves aren't the real problem.  

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The NCAA does not choose what member schools are.  Member Schools choose what the NCAA is.  A whole bunch of universities like to sponsor athletics on the side while offering university education.  The NCAA represents the interests of it's members, and those interests do not include vocational tech.

 

This is not in any way connected to the value or suitability of a trade school, or what's best for a student.  

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There are many different college sports associations. NCAA Division-I is not the only option out there. There are other divisions that include schools with other focuses but the NCAA Division-I is very much a collection of schools focused on academia in the traditional sense (even if it doesn't always permeate through the athletic department as much as we may like).

 

You want to wrestling in college and study auto mechanics? Go to Rochester Technical and Community College in Minnesota. Want to be a machinist? Go to Alfred State in New York. Want to be a shipbuilder? Go to Apprentice in Virginia. Want to study Dental Hygiene? Go to Springfield Technical Community College in Massachusetts. If Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning interests you then you should consider the Pennsylvania College of Technology.

 

There are options out there for kids that want to study the trades. No one is saying that NCAA Division-I is a kid's only option. It just happens that in wrestling the majority of the better athletes and the majority of the schools that allocate the most resources to wrestling are members of the NCAA Division-I.

 

I don't understand complaining that there are not options. If you choose to go D1, you are choosing to be a part of the academic structure of the D1 schools. If that structure is not for you then you should find the school that best meets the mission.

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Are they wrestling any D1 schools?

Good question.  No but Lindsey Wilson does compete at the Michigan State Open.  So does Ohio State (although they have a dual a few days before with UVA so that may affect which of their starters are at MSU).  Little bit of potential intrigue.  Micah Jordan vs Cam Tessari?  

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