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SetonHallPirate

Micic gets waiver from Big Ten, taking Olympic RS this year!

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In instances of a transfer, wouldn't any redshirt, if available, be ok to use to "pay" for a year of lost eligibility?  If that is, in fact what he did, he didn't get any special treatment.................

 

It does seem somehow "fair" to him (though not to NW and the rest of the B10), no matter the circumstances, since he was eligible for the Olympic redshirt.  However, he was automatically losing a year of eligibility because of the in-conference transfer and was supposedly ineligible to cash in on the Olympic redshirt because of it. 

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fp,

 

Is Cortez eligible for an Olympic redshirt?

 

He's not eligible through any of predefined criteria.  I don't know when the application process for the OR ends, but assuming it is still open he didn't strengthen his chance for an at-large bid with his performance at Bill Farrell.  He wrestled pretty well, only losing 5-4 to Zach Sanders and 6-6 to Hochstrasser, but that isn't going to make you a candidate IMO.

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Since we still don't have the full details of why Pariano left/was let go/fired/dismissed, how do we know that the Micic transfer was not prompted by something connected to the reasons for Pariano's eventual leaving/being let go/fired/dismissed?  Much to be explained to clear this whole situation up....

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First of all, let me say that I'm glad that Micic got an extra year of eligibility approved as it's always good to see more great wrestlers each year (so now there will be an extra one in 2019-20).

 

But the rule that was waived has absolutely ZERO to do with the qualification for an Olympic RS.  The rule plainly states you forfeit a year of eligibility (meaning you can only compete in 3 years, not 4) for an intraconference transfer.  So any logic that this was waived somehow because Micic qualified for an Olympic RS is deeply flawed and there is no way that the B1G used this logic in the waiver process.  The rule has NOTHING to do with when, if and how many RS years you take.

 

It will be interesting to hear the rationale behind the waiver, because it really opens them up in terms of precedence.  Not sure that anyone can cite me a case of this having happened before.  I certainly can't think of any.

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First of all, let me say that I'm glad that Micic got an extra year of eligibility approved as it's always good to see more great wrestlers each year (so now there will be an extra one in 2019-20).

 

But the rule that was waived has absolutely ZERO to do with the qualification for an Olympic RS.  The rule plainly states you forfeit a year of eligibility (meaning you can only compete in 3 years, not 4) for an intraconference transfer.  So any logic that this was waived somehow because Micic qualified for an Olympic RS is deeply flawed and there is no way that the B1G used this logic in the waiver process.  The rule has NOTHING to do with when, if and how many RS years you take.

 

It will be interesting to hear the rationale behind the waiver, because it really opens them up in terms of precedence.  Not sure that anyone can cite me a case of this having happened before.  I certainly can't think of any.

I don't really feel like taking the time to look up the rule so could you please provide a link I would like to see where it says that? Not sure if wrestling is anything like football but any time a kid transfers inter conference and still has a red shirt available they are allowed to use it during that "forfeited year". Every one is acting like they are giving him something for nothing he earned the opportunity to use an Olympic red shirt by earning a bronze medal at junior worlds no different then any other using an Olympic red shirt this year.

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The way the rule is written, you must be enrolled in the new institution and lose a year of eligibility (see below). The reason an Olympic redshirt is relevant to the discussion is that Micic wants to focus on freestyle and doesn't want to lose this year now that he's eligible again, otherwise he would be back to 3 years. 

 

Intraconference Transfer Rules.

1. Pre-Matriculation. A prospective student-athlete who has signed a tender from a Conference institution and has not yet triggered transfer status per NCAA Bylaw 14.5.2 (conditions affecting transfer status), is subject to the following intraconference transfer requirements:

 

a. Signed National Letter of Intent. A prospective student-athlete who signs a valid National Letter of Intent (NLI) with a Conference institution but subsequently enrolls at an alternate Big Ten institution shall be required to complete one (1) full year of residence at the alternate (i.e., certifying) Big Ten institution and shall be charged with the loss of one (1) season of eligibility in all sports. These penalties shall be applied regardless of any decision made by the NLI Steering Committee on behalf of the prospective student-athlete.

 

1. Exception - Complete Release by Signing Institution. If the Big Ten institution at which the prospective student-athlete originally signed the NLI grants a "Complete Release" from the NLI, the prospect shall be permitted to enroll at any other Conference institution without penalty.

 

2. Exception - NLI Declared Null and Void. Should the NLI become null and void prior to the prospective student-athlete's matriculation, the prospective student-athlete shall be free to enroll at any other Conference institution without penalty.

b. Signed Tender without National Letter of Intent. A prospective student-athlete that signs a valid tender with a Conference institution but subsequently enrolls at an alternate Big Ten institution shall be required to complete one (1) full academic year of residence at the alternate (i.e.,certifying) Big Ten institution and shall be charged with the loss of one

 

(1) season of eligibility in all sports. Upon mutual agreement of the two involved Conference institutions, this penalty shall be waived by the Chair of the Academics and Eligibility Subcommittee.

 

2. Post Matriculation. A student-athlete that has signed a tender from a Conference institution and has triggered transfer status per NCAA Bylaw 14.5.2 (conditions affecting transfer status), may not represent an alternate Big Ten institution in intercollegiate athletics competition until the individual has completed one (1) full academic year of residence at the alternate (i.e.,certifying) Big Ten institution and shall be charged with the loss of one (1) season of eligibility in all sports.

 

3. Pre- and Post-Matriculation Exceptions

 

a. Cancellation of Tender Due to Inadmissibility. When a prospective student-athlete is inadmissible to the institution for which a tender has been accepted, the tender shall be considered null and void and the intraconference transfer penalty does not apply.

 

b. Dropped Sport. When a Conference institution drops the student-athlete's sport in which the student-athlete has participated, the intraconference penalty does not apply.

Edited by Flying-Tiger

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Well there you have it - 2. Post Matriculation. A student-athlete that has signed a tender from a Conference institution and has triggered transfer status per NCAA Bylaw 14.5.2 (conditions affecting transfer status), may not represent an alternate Big Ten institution in intercollegiate athletics competition until the individual has completed one (1) full academic year of residence at the alternate (i.e.,certifying) Big Ten institution and shall be charged with the loss of one (1) season of eligibility in all sports.

I don't see anywhere that it says the athlete may NOT use a red shirt in place of not competing the full academic year. He still is losing a season of eligibility if he had not EARNED the Olympic red shirt he would be out the season and next year he would be a RS So. Would you still be complaining if he has transferred at the beginning of last season and sat out the year with a red shirt? 

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A lot of misunderstanding here. The Big Ten rule states that if you transfer in the conference you will have to be enrolled for one academic year before you can compete. In addition, you will be limited to 3 years of eligibility instead of 4. Redshirting doesn't matter, and neither does an Olympic redshirt. In the NCAA, you get to compete four years. If you transfer from one Big Ten school to another, you lose one of those years and only get to compete for three.

 

For some reason, Micic was granted a waiver both to the year in residence requirement and the loss of a season of eligibility. 

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IronChef,

 

Where in the rules do you see only eligible for 3 years instead of 4?  My full understanding is you are eligible 5 seasons(6 with oly redshirt) to compete 4 seasons.  It says you lose ONE SEASON of ELIGIBILITY.  If you originally have 6 seasons(in Micic's case due to Oly Redshirts) and have used a traditional redshirt, how can you not then use the Olympic season eligibility and still have 4 seasons left?

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You're right, the Olympic redshirt isn't a way around the rule. I'd also be real curious to see what criteria the BigTen relied upon to grant this and if it's available to everyone. 

 

That's easy...because it's Michigan.  tOSU would have gotten the same benefit.  No one else in the Big Ten would have gotten that. 

 

Still, I'm kind of glad Micic got the extra year.  By all accounts he seems to be a good kid.

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The misunderstanding is in the definition of "eligibility."  Eligibility doesn't pertain to RS years.  It is years in which you are representing your institution in NCAA competition.

 

That is the way it is written in the interpretation of a redshirt.  From NCAA Q & A:

 

"Redshirt" is not an official NCAA term. What a "redshirt" season refers to is a year in which a student-athlete does not compete at all against outside competition. During a year in which the student-athlete does not compete, a student can practice with his or her team and receive financial aid. NCAA Division II student-athletes have 10 semesters or 15 quarters of full-time enrollment in order to participate as a student-athlete. Of these 10 semesters or 15 quarters, a student-athlete only has four years of athletics eligibility (seasons of competition) in which he or she can participate against outside competition. Because of this, there is an extra year of time, and many student-athletes choose to use this extra time as a "redshirt" year in which they practice with their team but do not compete against other teams in competition.

 

See bolded above.

 

But maybe the B1G has a different interpretation than the NCAA.

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You get four years of eligibility, not 5. In Division I, you have the option to defer that eligibility for a year, which is what is colloquially, but not officially, referred to as a redshirt. Even though it's deferred, you still only get 4.

 

Read the rule: "shall be charged with the loss of one season of eligibility in all sports." You had four, but an in conference transfer drops you down to three. The year you lose is a year of competition.

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The misunderstanding is in the definition of "eligibility." Eligibility doesn't pertain to RS years. It is years in which you are representing your institution in NCAA competition.

 

That is the way it is written in the interpretation of a redshirt. From NCAA Q & A:

 

"Redshirt" is not an official NCAA term. What a "redshirt" season refers to is a year in which a student-athlete does not compete at all against outside competition. During a year in which the student-athlete does not compete, a student can practice with his or her team and receive financial aid. NCAA Division II student-athletes have 10 semesters or 15 quarters of full-time enrollment in order to participate as a student-athlete. Of these 10 semesters or 15 quarters, a student-athlete only has four years of athletics eligibility (seasons of competition) in which he or she can participate against outside competition. Because of this, there is an extra year of time, and many student-athletes choose to use this extra time as a "redshirt" year in which they practice with their team but do not compete against other teams in competition.

 

See bolded above.

 

But maybe the B1G has a different interpretation than the NCAA.

I don't know about the B1G's interpretation but the posters in this thread are pretty liberal with their interpretation. "6 years of eligibility"? Whoa now.

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I don't know about the B1G's interpretation but the posters in this thread are pretty liberal with their interpretation. "6 years of eligibility"? Whoa now.

 

Agree.  Forgot to add the "sarcasm" emogee to my last sentence about the B1G's interpretation being different than the NCAA.

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You get four years of eligibility, not 5. In Division I, you have the option to defer that eligibility for a year, which is what is colloquially, but not officially, referred to as a redshirt. Even though it's deferred, you still only get 4.

 

Read the rule: "shall be charged with the loss of one season of eligibility in all sports." You had four, but an in conference transfer drops you down to three. The year you lose is a year of competition.

But during the so-called redshirt year you have to be enrolled full-time.  If you take an "Olympic redshirt" you cannot be enrolled.  Thr Big 10 is clearly circumventing the intention of their own exceptional rule.

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Yes, Micic is getting a pass on both "penalties" for transfer. He is not being required to serve a year in residence, and he is not being docked a year of eligibility. It's very strange, and I wonder if we will ever find out why it happened.

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If MSU's read on this is correct, then the waiver isn't news at all. His fourth year of eligibility would have been a forgone conclusion as soon as he won a medal at Worlds and qualified for an Olympic redshirt. The "waiver" would be a formality. Why is Michigan making a big deal about the B1G's decision?

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If MSU's read on this is correct, then the waiver isn't news at all. His fourth year of eligibility would have been a forgone conclusion as soon as he won a medal at Worlds and qualified for an Olympic redshirt. The "waiver" would be a formality. Why is Michigan making a big deal about the B1G's decision?

It's a big deal for Michigan because they get 4 years of Micic in the lineup instead of 3. Olympic redshirt has nothing to do with any of this.

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