Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
SetonHallPirate

Micic gets waiver from Big Ten, taking Olympic RS this year!

Recommended Posts

Guys,

 

I, in no way, was saying I knew for certain either way.  I always thought you had 5 seasons or 6 seasons(medical waivers/hardships/olymic redshirts) of "eligibility" to "compete" 4 seasons.  The rules are a tad vague, in my opinion anyway, on what exactly should/could/would be lost by losing a season of "eligibility".........................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You only have 4 seasons of eligibility but you have 5 years in which to complete them (notwithstanding Medical Hardship Waiver/Oly RS).

 

You have eligibility in each sport separately.  That is why guys like Mocco who completed their wrestling eligibility in 4 years could play football in their 5th year.  He hadn't used his 4 years of football eligibility, but he only had one year left because of the 4 in 5 years rule.

 

Which is probably why the B1G rule states that you lose a year of eligibility in ALL sports.  That's probably more relevent for something like Track/Cross Country that are treated as different sports to avoid someone trying to transfer and competing in one while saying they were a transfer in the other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You get four years of eligibility, not 5. In Division I, you have the option to defer that eligibility for a year, which is what is colloquially, but not officially, referred to as a redshirt. Even though it's deferred, you still only get 4.

 

Read the rule: "shall be charged with the loss of one season of eligibility in all sports." You had four, but an in conference transfer drops you down to three. The year you lose is a year of competition.

 

I know what you're saying, but the NCAA manual words it differently in Sec. 12.8.  There it references a "five-year period of eligibility"  in which a student-athlete must complete their maximum allotted "four seasons of competition."  

 

The only reason I mention the above is because the Big 10 rule references the loss of "one season of eligibility." Is this synonymous with the NCAA manual's "year of eligibility" or with their "season of competition"? I don't think it would matter in a case like Micic's, but it might come into play in other circumstances.

Edited by HurricaneWrestling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The misunderstanding is in the definition of "eligibility."  Eligibility doesn't pertain to RS years.  It is years in which you are representing your institution in NCAA competition.

 

That is the way it is written in the interpretation of a redshirt.  From NCAA Q & A:

 

"Redshirt" is not an official NCAA term. What a "redshirt" season refers to is a year in which a student-athlete does not compete at all against outside competition. During a year in which the student-athlete does not compete, a student can practice with his or her team and receive financial aid. NCAA Division II student-athletes have 10 semesters or 15 quarters of full-time enrollment in order to participate as a student-athlete. Of these 10 semesters or 15 quarters, a student-athlete only has four years of athletics eligibility (seasons of competition) in which he or she can participate against outside competition. Because of this, there is an extra year of time, and many student-athletes choose to use this extra time as a "redshirt" year in which they practice with their team but do not compete against other teams in competition.

 

See bolded above.

 

But maybe the B1G has a different interpretation than the NCAA.

 

That's a reasonable common sense explanation of the rule.  However, the language you're relying on to define "eligibility" is contradicted by other NCAA pronouncements, including the official NCAA D-I Manual (see above post).

 

Below's a link to the NCAA page on "Transfer Terms," which provides a little different take than their Q & A.  It explains that, while a redshirt doesn't represent the school in competition, he is nonetheless an eligible student-athlete.  And, as long as he doesn't officially compete, he will not be charged with a season of competition.  But if he steps on the mat for one second in an official match, he's no longer a redshirt (and will be charged with a season of competition).  

http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/current/transfer-terms

Edited by HurricaneWrestling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about all the rules mumbo jumbo but either way, good for Micic.

However, I do feel he shouldn't have been granted the extra year as it sets a potentially dangerous precedent.

If we don't know the reason for the waiver being granted it is hard to tell if it is a dangerous precedent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a big deal for Michigan because they get 4 years of Micic in the lineup instead of 3. Olympic redshirt has nothing to do with any of this.

Olympic RS has everything to do with the appeal by Michigan to forego the Big 10 stipulation.  Had Micic not decided to go to OTC, they would never have attempted to circumvent the rule.

 

My question:  When did MIcic decide to go Olympic, and if his decision came after he ditched Northwestern, was part of the offer from Michigan that they would help him get the Big 10 rule waived?

Edited by carp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is terribly confusing. Let's see if I understand:

 

Under the rules as written, Micic "should" have had two penalties: 1) sitting out an academic year before competing and 2) only competing varsity for 3 years. Now, for a currently unknown reason, the Big Ten has "waived" both of those "penalties;" Micic doesn't have to sit an academic year, and he gets 4 years of competition?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Olympic RS has everything to do with the appeal by Michigan to forego the Big 10 stipulation.  Had Micic not decided to go to OTC, they would never have attempted to circumvent the rule.

 

My question:  When did MIcic decide to go Olympic, and if his decision came after he ditched Northwestern, was part of the offer from Michigan that they would help him get the Big 10 rule waived?

Micic didn't qualify for the Olympic Redshirt until after he announced he was heading to Michigan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe the Olympic redshirt has anything to do with this. That's simply the explanation for what he's doing this season. With the waiver, he's able to compete immediately but isn't - because he's using an Olympic redshirt. I'm guessing the Big Ten's decision to give Micic the waiver is based on the same reason that Northwestern decided to fire Pariano (and the same reason Micic wanted to transfer out in the first place).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Micic didn't qualify for the Olympic Redshirt until after he announced he was heading to Michigan.

Doesn't quite answer the question of when he decided to take the Olympic redshirt and what were the circumstances that influenced the decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't quite answer the question of when he decided to take the Olympic redshirt and what were the circumstances that influenced the decision.

Here is the order of events

 

1. Micic announces he is transferring

2. Micic announces Michigan is his destination

3. Micic places 3rd at Junior Worlds, thus qualifying himself for an Olympic Redshirt

4. Micic is granted his year back

 

He didn't even qualify for the Olympic Redshirt until after classes had started at Michigan.

 

On top of that the most important thing is it is highly UNLIKELY that the Olympic Redshirt has anything to do with the one year penalty being waived.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the order of events

 

1. Micic announces he is transferring

2. Micic announces Michigan is his destination

3. Micic places 3rd at Junior Worlds, thus qualifying himself for an Olympic Redshirt

4. Micic is granted his year back

 

He didn't even qualify for the Olympic Redshirt until after classes had started at Michigan.

 

On top of that the most important thing is it is highly UNLIKELY that the Olympic Redshirt has anything to do with the one year penalty being waived.

"t is highly UNLIKELY that the Olympic Redshirt has anything to do with the one year penalty being waived"  You and others who have stated this have no idea if this is the case.  And this still does not answer the question of when he ecided to take the Oympic year opportunity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...