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DiMaria

Chance Marsteller quitting the sport of wrestling?

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So what??

 

None of that changes the fact that it is MUCH, MUCH HARDER to excel at MIT than at some podunk engineering program. Having talent and putting it to work in an environment that maximally challenges that talent are very, very different things. You can "classify" highly, but if you practice with tier 2 guys and compete in a league chock full of them, I don't care if you're Jordan Burroughs, your experience is just not the same. Never will be.

Yet..........it can be done.

JP O'Connor had no problem excelling excuse free at Harvard.

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So what??

 

None of that changes the fact that it is MUCH, MUCH HARDER to excel at MIT than at some podunk engineering program. Having talent and putting it to work in an environment that maximally challenges that talent are very, very different things. You can "classify" highly, but if you practice with tier 2 guys and compete in a league chock full of them, I don't care if you're Jordan Burroughs, your experience is just not the same. Never will be.

grossberger excelled in wrestling with a double major graduating from MIT. it can be done.

Edited by gutfirst

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Zebra - The grind is tough. Regardless of level, I don't discount that.

 

But his situation is likely 180 degrees different from anything you dealt with while wrestling in college.

 

The pressure, demands and constant micro-management of weight and activity he was probably going through takes everything out of the sport (and probably him). Being thousands of miles from home without a support network compounds things. I know, I have experience with it in a Big 10 program.

 

It doesn't seem that you went through that. As a father, I hope your son doesn't. 

Old Marine, you seem to be dialed in the ASU wrestling. If he is even considering wrestling again,  Marsteller could be a fit out there, depending on his location preference. Depending on where A Valencia wrestles, ASU has a 165 or 174 need. They have many great guys that have great makeup. Good luck to him on finding the right path to take to whatever is the next stage in his life.

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grossberger excelled in wrestling with a double major graduating from MIT. it can be done.

 

Again, so what? Nobody said it was literally impossible. The point is your guy had a very different and more difficult experience than the random non-D1 engineer who wrestled and went to the 100th ranked engineering school in the country.

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Podunk engineering program?    Is that like a stupid brain surgeon?

 

OSU: good wrestling

zebra's D2 school that supposedly gave him the same experience as Marsteller: podunk wrestling

 

MIT: good engineering

University of Idaho: podunk engineering

 

I know it's a difficult analogy, but do you get it?

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You know the whole topic pisses me off now.

Pressure, this, that, the other thing, blah, blah.

 

Full ride to Okie St: not necessarily the most challenging academic institution in the world.  Not knocking it but again... not hard.

*you go to school to work hard at wrestling (the thing you love) and go to class

*you are good, and people expect you to be good

 

What is the problem?

Pressure is a privilege, get over it.  You don't like it, don't be good then.  

It ain't easy and just because he whooped it up in HS in PA doesn't guarantee him success or any quarter in any college program.

Earn it and shut it.

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You know the whole topic pisses me off now.

Pressure, this, that, the other thing, blah, blah.

 

Full ride to Okie St: not necessarily the most challenging academic institution in the world.  Not knocking it but again... not hard.

*you go to school to work hard at wrestling (the thing you love) and go to class

*you are good, and people expect you to be good

 

What is the problem?

Pressure is a privilege, get over it.  You don't like it, don't be good then.  

It ain't easy and just because he whooped it up in HS in PA doesn't guarantee him success or any quarter in any college program.

Earn it and shut it.

 

That's all well and good. I have no problem with that.

 

What I have a problem with is guys who couldn't have made it as a waterboy at OSU pretending to know what it's like to wrestle at OSU while getting the piss pounded out of you by Alex Dieringer and having to starve yourself to exhaustion. It's one thing to say what you say, "shame on him for quitting", which is fine, but it's quite another to say, "I know what he went through and it's not that big a deal."

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OSU: good wrestling

zebra's D2 school that supposedly gave him the same experience as Marsteller: podunk wrestling

 

MIT: good engineering

University of Idaho: podunk engineering

 

I know it's a difficult analogy, but do you get it?

Is it that you can't comprehend or intentionally choose to not understand? 

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Zebra, you seem like a good guy, although you don't seem to have much sympathy for Marsteller. I have no beef with you personally.

 

However, I think you made the following stupid statement: "I just don't buy the whole my college experience was tougher argument. We all had it tough."

 

First of all, just because a college grad went to college does NOT mean his experience was comparable to all other college grads'. I know this is ridiculously obvious, but your comment appears to completely miss that obvious point.

 

More importantly, Marsteller quit wresting. He didn't quit college. He didn't quite life. It was just wrestling.

 

As to why, only Chance truly knows, but it's not hard to imagine that it was exceptionally difficult to cut to the point at which he couldn't even wrestle a full minute without physically crashing while starting--and severely underperforming--at one of the toughest rooms in the country. 

 

The truth is that you have zero idea how tough he had it, so you are either severely full of yourself or have zero appreciation for how much harder the grind is at the D1 level, especially in a room chock full of elite talent.

 

As I said, I have no problem with the guys who are calling Marsteller out as a quitter. I had no issue at all even with Granbytroll's classless thread. But you can't and don't know what it was like for Chance from a wrestling perspective, so don't use your own experience as a barometer to judge him. When JB failed to win worlds, hampered by a knee injury, I didn't say, "I know what that's like, and it's not that tough, I tore my ACL too but had no problem running the table at my local podunk HS tournament back in my day." I did say, "you can't take anything away from Tsargush just because JB was hurt. Stop making excuses for JB." We are fans on a message board. We make unsubstantiated comments and judgments all the time. That's what these boards are for. There's no need to try to validate those comments with personal anecdotes that frankly detract from the points more than not.

 

The fact that you were an engineer is completely irrelevant. Maybe one person a year out of MIT's entire student body might last a month in the OSU room, but all could probably out-nerd you with ease. That doesn't mean they understand what it was like for you to go through four or five years of college wrestling. Similarly, unless you were a starter at a top D1 program and had to cut 13 lbs. below your HS wrestling weight despite obviously not being able to do it without severe physical consequences, you have no idea what Marsteller has been through.

Edited by wrestlingnerd

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so many excuses in this thread...

 

seems to me that if marstellar didn't want to cut to 57s then he should not have reneged on PSU and agreed to go to OSU and wrestle 57s... it really is that simple...

 

if he wanted to then quit wrestling, fine, but, don't "quit" after you have already got yourself suspended from the team...

 

there is a pattern of behavior here...

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Zebra, what's getting folks riled up is the notion that a D2 wrestling experience is comparable to a D1 experience at the most historically successful program in the country wrestling behind the pound for pound best wrestler in college. I hate to be yet another guy to break it to you, but you are wrong.

 

You were an engineer, so perhaps this analogy will resonate with you. Taking AP physics at a good public high school is not as hard as studying to make the dean's list at MIT with a full course load. It's just not and never will be.

Taking a full course load at MIT and making the dean's list is actually impossible, as there is no dean's list at MIT.

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Would it not be "Poetic Justice" if he were to enroll at a small school and beat Smith at the NCAA tournament at 165? 

Why would that be poetic justice?  Chance was given every opportunity by Coach Smith.  Coach Smith stuck with him long after he was compelled to and continued to start him when Joe had already beaten him and out performed him.  And it appears Coach Smith was prepared to let him keep the spot when he wasn't the best 157 on the team.  What possible poetic justice could come from the situation you described?

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Again, so what? Nobody said it was literally impossible. The point is your guy had a very different and more difficult experience than the random non-D1 engineer who wrestled and went to the 100th ranked engineering school in the country.

btw who is my guy? i just provided a guy who happen to excel at wrestling at MIT and throw in a movie reference that likely went unnoticed.

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Coaches have the ability to recruit a group of kids which generally feels the way they do about the sport and as such most college athletes have a positive experience however this is not always the case. There are always a few kids who simply do not mesh with a coach or feel comfortable on a particular campus.

 

You see this in every sport.  

Definitely saw this in our room during my first college season, and we were the national champions in our division that year, so our coach obviously was a good recruiter and, IMO, fostered a positive and competitive culture. Some athletes just seem to end up resenting their coach (and/or surroundings, culture, etc...), and generally end up off of the team, regardless of their respective wrestling talents. 

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