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Jubele135

Aaron Pico's Snaps

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After watching Pico the last couple years, from Cadets to Juniors and now at the Senior level, one thing that I can't wrap my head around are his snap downs. It doesn't matter who he is facing, how strong, how talented, etc., Pico snaps are still so effective. When other wrestlers are hand fighting and snap down their opponent, it often doesn't have much of an effect and the guy remains balanced, while Pico snaps his opponents to their face half the time. What is he doing that is so different than everyone else?

 

There was a wrestler in the early 2000's, I am not positive who it was. He used to score a lot of takedowns from snapping his opponent and spinning behind (I don't remember exactly as it was a long time ago). Maybe it was Zach Roberson? If anyone remembers who I am referring to, let me know

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After watching Pico the last couple years, from Cadets to Juniors and now at the Senior level, one thing that I can't wrap my head around are his snap downs. It doesn't matter who he is facing, how strong, how talented, etc., Pico snaps are still so effective. When other wrestlers are hand fighting and snap down their opponent, it often doesn't have much of an effect and the guy remains balanced, while Pico snaps his opponents to their face half the time. What is he doing that is so different than everyone else?

 

There was a wrestler in the early 2000's, I am not positive who it was. He used to score a lot of takedowns from snapping his opponent and spinning behind (I don't remember exactly as it was a long time ago). Maybe it was Zach Roberson? If anyone remembers who I am referring to, let me know

Howe is real good, Snyder too.  Burroughs also.  Pico has a very effective snap. Very quick, very powerful.  No Fear. Confident. Those matter the most, besides the obviousness of positioning and core strength.  

 

Fadzaev used to snap guys into a front headlock, then knock them out, or nearly knock them out, then spin behind and go into an arm trap. 

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Those are all good examples as well. Howe and Pico are both incredibly heavy on the head, and seem to be exhausting for anyone to wrestle. With Howe, to me it looks like he is just using brute strength and muscling the guy down, but watching Pico it doesn't really look like that to me. It looks more fluid, and like you said very quick and technical.

 

Burroughs incredible movement throughout matches along with fakes, changing directions, etc gets his opponents so off balance, and I think that plays a factor in making his snaps so effective. He is just the total package. His re-shots are unstoppable, and I feel like he is still improving-- his ability to get angles and transitions to laces seem better than ever

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Those are all good examples as well. Howe and Pico are both incredibly heavy on the head, and seem to be exhausting for anyone to wrestle. With Howe, to me it looks like he is just using brute strength and muscling the guy down, but watching Pico it doesn't really look like that to me. It looks more fluid, and like you said very quick and technical.

 

Burroughs incredible movement throughout matches along with fakes, changing directions, etc gets his opponents so off balance, and I think that plays a factor in making his snaps so effective. He is just the total package. His re-shots are unstoppable, and I feel like he is still improving-- his ability to get angles and transitions to laces seem better than ever

Pico's snaps are awesome.  Been watching him for a very long time and in HS, he'd be snapping kids faces into the mat.

 

JB is just..well, JB.

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Snaps like that have much less to do with strength than they do with rhythm and timing (except for maybe Howe at the end of the match, when his "heaviness" has worn you into the mat).  

 

I'll never forget officiating a good, but skinny, high school 119 snap an also good 119 high schooler instantaneously forehead first so hard into the mat that he was temporarily paralyzed and had to be rushed to the hospital.  Snapping--like karate chopping wood--is art and timing and technique more than brute force.

Edited by maligned

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After watching Pico the last couple years, from Cadets to Juniors and now at the Senior level, one thing that I can't wrap my head around are his snap downs. It doesn't matter who he is facing, how strong, how talented, etc., Pico snaps are still so effective. When other wrestlers are hand fighting and snap down their opponent, it often doesn't have much of an effect and the guy remains balanced, while Pico snaps his opponents to their face half the time. What is he doing that is so different than everyone else?

 

There was a wrestler in the early 2000's, I am not positive who it was. He used to score a lot of takedowns from snapping his opponent and spinning behind (I don't remember exactly as it was a long time ago). Maybe it was Zach Roberson? If anyone remembers who I am referring to, let me know

You are right.. It was Zach Roberson from Iowa State. His wasn't a traditional snap and spin... It was more of a combo of a snap/shuck by type movement... He would snap with one hand and almost completely pass the guy by like a bullfighter. Pico gets his pressure from his left hand digging over like he's going to hit a slide by (which he often does)... Then snapping both the arm and head and into a front headlock opposite side.

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Jason Nolf has an incredibly effective snap and I wholeheartedly agree with Maligned that it is a matter of timing and rhythm. If you watch Nolf, especially, he often steps forward as if he is looking for a leg and then just at the right moment when his opponent doesn't have much weight on his forward leg and is off balance, Nolf snaps. It's that timing that makes it so effective. The energy required to right yourself after being snapped is incredible and wears you down. If you don't right yourself, you get taken down.

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You are right.. It was Zach Roberson from Iowa State. His wasn't a traditional snap and spin... It was more of a combo of a snap/shuck by type movement... He would snap with one hand and almost completely pass the guy by like a bullfighter. Pico gets his pressure from his left hand digging over like he's going to hit a slide by (which he often does)... Then snapping both the arm and head and into a front headlock opposite side.

Ahh you're right, thanks for confirming. I remember one year at NCAA's he did his snap/shuck for takedowns over and over one match. Sure everyone at NCAA's can do shrugs, shucks, and snaps for a takedown, but I thought it was impressive how he was able to do it repeatedly as his go-to move against guys at that level who obviously know it's coming.

 

Same thing with Pico-- everyone knows it's coming. But like mnmike and Maligned said, he feels that pressure and has that timing/rhythm down, and guys can't stop it.

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Sitting in the stands this weekend and you could literally hear his hands make contact with guys...it was like anvils coming down on the backs of their necks/heads.  I've seen it on video but that was the first time I have ever watched him in person and those snaps are all I could talk about when he was on the mat.  Fun to watch.  

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Howe doesn't really snap, he pulls and holds. He strategy is similar to an anaconda, just holds while the victim struggles and wastes energy. Sometimes Howe pulls and holds and his opponent gets called for passivity. He wins but it's boring as hell to watch

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I remember being at Folkstyle Nationals and watching Pico wrestle his freshman year.  Like mentioned above, his snaps were audible.  I have never heard a high school wrestler with hands like that.  It is clearly the perfect combination of explosive force and timing. 

 

One of my high school wrestlers was a Golden Gloves boxer.  He had great snaps as well.  Him and I were talking about Pico's snaps and he said, "Yeah his hands are heavy, he is Cheeks Pico."  My guy knew Pico from boxing.  He didn't even know him as a wrestler until after he won California state.  I think his boxing training and the specific force he developed through that have a lot to do with the success of his snaps. 

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