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The duckunder as a skill

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Since we're talking about guys with great duck-unders now, Jesse Jantzen deserves mention. The duck-under to his right (opponent's left) was one of his go-to moves. He had great success with it at every level of competition, from junior high all the way to world competition. Here is a great clip chronicling his career that shows him hitting it a bunch of times:

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I posted this earlier, but have no idea why the post doesn't show up.... so here it is again.

 

 

Since we are talking about guys with great duck-unders now, Jesse Jantzen deserves mention. He had a great duck-under that was effective throughout his career, from junior high to NCAA to world levels. Here is a clip that chronicles Jesse's career in which he hits the move several times:

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I posted this earlier, but have no idea why the post doesn't show up.... so here it is again.

 

 

Since we are talking about guys with great duck-unders now, Jesse Jantzen deserves mention. He had a great duck-under that was effective throughout his career, from junior high to NCAA to world levels. Here is a clip that chronicles Jesse's career in which he hits the move several times: [url=

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The duck he hits to the side that the opponent has wrist control is SWEET!

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I posted this earlier, but have no idea why the post doesn't show up.... so here it is again.

 

 

Since we are talking about guys with great duck-unders now, Jesse Jantzen deserves mention. He had a great duck-under that was effective throughout his career, from junior high to NCAA to world levels. Here is a clip that chronicles Jesse's career in which he hits the move several times: [url=

[/quote[/url]]

 

Thanks for the post.....great highlights tape.....Jesse had a great arsenal ......leg attacks, dumps, the footsweep (a favorite of mine), which he hit a lot of.... the duck under, which it appears he also used a lot, and more. Great wrestler, great highlights tape....thanks again!!!!

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I think there is no more beautiful / artful move than the duck under done right.

 

I remember seeing Clery taking Uetake down with it -- did anybody else see that by any chance?

 

And there was a guy from SCI - Northern Iowa -- I think Jim Sanford -- who poetry with the move.

 

(Unfortunately, I never could figure the move out -- or maybe I just was never was that "slick" :? )

 

Best -

 

DA

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While I completely agree on the "duckunder" being a vital aspect of any wrestlers bag of tricks on their feet, I disagree about the superduck or even the spladle.

 

 

If most old school coaches will just stress the fundamentals and basics, they are selling those wrestlers short in my opinion. Take the spladle for example. The setup for this move is when wrestler A shoots a head inside single and sits there with the leg while wrestler B fights to defend the single. If wrestle A continues to sit and fight in this position, he is susceptible to the spladle. Finishes need to be done quickly, or head needs to not stay buried to defend against the spladle. Some wrestlers, I have seen this first hand, stick that leg out saying "come take a single leg, I am going to spladle you."

 

If a coach chooses not to teach their wrestlers the spladle and a wrestler find themselves caught in that position, they are left to say "what the heck happened out there, I had a good shot, I even had control of his leg and before I knew it I was on my back wondering what the eff just happened," see: (Darrion Caldwell versus Brent Metcalf). If they know what that position feels like ahead of time and they find themselves there in a match, they are more likely to not get hit with that spladle, IMO. The superduck can be looked at similarly, teach it, so you know how to defend it, or atleast have a more optimal opporunity to defend against it.

 

Why not show wrestlers everything you have when it comes to wrestling and let them pick and choose from that, to be their strengths, instead of just saying, "that spladle is a junk move, we just aren't going to get caught in it." With an approach and attitude like that, you most certainly would at some point.

 

I do not want to defend every coach, and I think it is imperative that coaches evolve with the sport, but that being said... the hardest thing for a coach to do is budget their time. The decisions they make are not black and white like "is this move junk, or is that move junk-" it is a complicated cost benefit calculation of "I only have x numbers of hours in my season to condition, wrestle off, manage weight, and teach technique. What moves, techniques and skills get the most benefit for the least investment in hours?" For me that usually comes down to basics and working individually as much as possible with wrestlers. There really is no point taking a half an hour on spladles with a team where 50% can not properly level change or sprawl. You will get more benefit from the basics in that half hour. But, I would consider doing duck unders for a team like that because it is far more versatile- it can be a take down, but it is also a very effective way to work on the skill of level change and the mechanics of so many other take downs- as people have mentioned. The spladle is a one trick pony, well maybe two trick pony if you are going to put it in from the top position ala NSimmons. Its mechanics are very specific and unique to it (although slightly related to switches and cradles.)The duck under is the type of thing that pays off more because it helps with so many other things- how many times do you yell "head up- back straight- cut the corner after you shoot" on Hicrotch and doubles? Ducks really reinforce those mechanics. So- I don't consider the spladle junk, but I dont teach it to too many either. I would consider it junk coaching to teach a spladle or leg cradle to a five year old who should be working basics.

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While I completely agree on the "duckunder" being a vital aspect of any wrestlers bag of tricks on their feet, I disagree about the superduck or even the spladle.

 

 

If most old school coaches will just stress the fundamentals and basics, they are selling those wrestlers short in my opinion. Take the spladle for example. The setup for this move is when wrestler A shoots a head inside single and sits there with the leg while wrestler B fights to defend the single. If wrestle A continues to sit and fight in this position, he is susceptible to the spladle. Finishes need to be done quickly, or head needs to not stay buried to defend against the spladle. Some wrestlers, I have seen this first hand, stick that leg out saying "come take a single leg, I am going to spladle you."

 

If a coach chooses not to teach their wrestlers the spladle and a wrestler find themselves caught in that position, they are left to say "what the heck happened out there, I had a good shot, I even had control of his leg and before I knew it I was on my back wondering what the eff just happened," see: (Darrion Caldwell versus Brent Metcalf). If they know what that position feels like ahead of time and they find themselves there in a match, they are more likely to not get hit with that spladle, IMO. The superduck can be looked at similarly, teach it, so you know how to defend it, or atleast have a more optimal opporunity to defend against it.

 

Why not show wrestlers everything you have when it comes to wrestling and let them pick and choose from that, to be their strengths, instead of just saying, "that spladle is a junk move, we just aren't going to get caught in it." With an approach and attitude like that, you most certainly would at some point.

 

I do not want to defend every coach, and I think it is imperative that coaches evolve with the sport, but that being said... the hardest thing for a coach to do is budget their time. The decisions they make are not black and white like "is this move junk, or is that move junk-" it is a complicated cost benefit calculation of "I only have x numbers of hours in my season to condition, wrestle off, manage weight, and teach technique. What moves, techniques and skills get the most benefit for the least investment in hours?" For me that usually comes down to basics and working individually as much as possible with wrestlers. There really is no point taking a half an hour on spladles with a team where 50% can not properly level change or sprawl. You will get more benefit from the basics in that half hour. But, I would consider doing duck unders for a team like that because it is far more versatile- it can be a take down, but it is also a very effective way to work on the skill of level change and the mechanics of so many other take downs- as people have mentioned. The spladle is a one trick pony, well maybe two trick pony if you are going to put it in from the top position ala NSimmons. Its mechanics are very specific and unique to it (although slightly related to switches and cradles.)The duck under is the type of thing that pays off more because it helps with so many other things- how many times do you yell "head up- back straight- cut the corner after you shoot" on Hicrotch and doubles? Ducks really reinforce those mechanics. So- I don't consider the spladle junk, but I dont teach it to too many either. I would consider it junk coaching to teach a spladle or leg cradle to a five year old who should be working basics.

 

I agree with you whole heartedly. I guess I didn't think we we talking about a 5 year old wrestler in this case. Additionally, with a 5 year old, yes I would stick to the very basics. I guess the point I was trying to make is that while some may consider it a junk move, I have witnessed the spladle work incredibly well in even high level matches. The duckunder on the other hand, you could teach to a 5 year old and have it be VERY successful!

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VQ, I never said the spladel was a "junk" move. I said it shouldn't be taught to new wrestlers, and that the basics(which includes a duck under)and positioning should take precedence way before something like the spladel or super duck should.

 

Edit: typo

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bakercopy2copy2_zpsbd6d2efc.jpg

 

Going to post examples of the duckunder, and how it can lead to great takedowns, such as doubles and hi-crotches, let alone as a takedown itself. That match was at the state tournament! The setup was off of his opponents wrist control on the duck under side.

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bakercopy2copy2_zpsbd6d2efc.jpg

 

Going to post examples of the duckunder, and how it can lead to great takedowns, such as doubles and hi-crotches, let alone as a takedown itself. That match was at the state tournament! The setup was off of his opponents wrist control on the duck under side.

 

 

For my doubter DCB, this is how that setup ended.

 

EB

 

NWHFMC

 

baker2copy2_zpsd52157f3.jpg

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I think Les Gutches also had a great variation of the duck-under.

 

 

Thanks, I'll check it out.....found some more today....Mike Mann and Nate Carr, which I knew Nate had a great one to a bodylock.....won him the World Cup.

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Jadidi was so quick and skilled at the duck under, he could do it without dropping his ice cream.

 

duckunder_zpsdcae7d70.jpg

 

 

Good one MM....now all they have to do, is straighten out what's going on with THE JADIDI Tournament!!!

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