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ironmonkey

Sumo (Tankanoyama Shuntaro)

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I know this isn't really college related in any way, but sumo often comes up indirectly when discussing the pushout or lack of one in college wrestling.  This isn't about the pushout.  This is about Tankanoyama Shuntaro.  If you have never watched him and you appreciate clearing ties, good hips, trips, and defeating bigger men at grappling, you are missing out.  Hopefully some of you will enjoy this.  I did!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gp_mhW6yLk

 

 

 

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He has very good hand fighting and balance.  But let's face it, he barely made Makunouchi and was a Maku****a and Juryo sumotori for most of his career.  I love smaller sumotori but the big guys do some pretty awesome stuff as well.  They're not all Konishiki...

Edited by akaoni

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I do watch sumo when I can (which is next to never unfortunately).  However, I readily admit I know next to nothing about it and the few times a decade that I happen to find it televised doesn't teach me much.  I wasn't claiming he was the best ever; simply that he was fun to watch and broke the mold of what most wrestling fans picture when discussing sumo (often in a way that implies sumo takes no skill).  

 

If I understand correctly, he was known for utilizing takedowns to offset size differences (as much as possible anyway).  That is fun to watch even if it didn't work as well as he progressed through the ranks.  

 

I will definitely check out Mainoumi Pipewrench.  Thanks!

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But Mainoumi  seems to be mainly trips and belt grabs. Not much would carry over.

 

Tankanoyama  is more redirections- arm drags and russian 2 on 1s. This seems like it would carry over quite well to push-outs. He also has the body control to keep his hands and knees from hitting down before the other guy in situations where both are falling together.

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I do watch sumo when I can (which is next to never unfortunately).  However, I readily admit I know next to nothing about it and the few times a decade that I happen to find it televised doesn't teach me much.  I wasn't claiming he was the best ever; simply that he was fun to watch and broke the mold of what most wrestling fans picture when discussing sumo (often in a way that implies sumo takes no skill).  

 

If I understand correctly, he was known for utilizing takedowns to offset size differences (as much as possible anyway).  That is fun to watch even if it didn't work as well as he progressed through the ranks.  

 

I will definitely check out Mainoumi Pipewrench.  Thanks!

 

Sorry, I wasn't trying to be critical.  Takanoyama is absolutely fun to watch, as is Mainoumi (who I loved watching when I lived in Japan).  But there are plenty of big guys who have amazing agility and technique as well.  Sumo, unfortunately suffers from some implicit bias because of the near-nudity, large sizes, and exotic trappings.  It is absolutely a great combat sport and fantastic to watch once you become familiarized with it.  

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i used to watch it when it was on ESPN late 90's early 00's... akebono was still legit and taka was making a name for himself... i really enjoyed the american production... got through a whole basho in 30 minutes... lots of action melted down... very viewable...

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Chiyonofuji, perhaps the greatest Yokozuna, was small by Sumo standards, but was strong as a bull and had great technique.  His Sumo is awesome to watch.

 

https://youtu.be/centaADiyRA

 

Bonus young Yokozuna Takanohana sighting back in his Maegashira days at the end of the video.

 

(Bad English summary at the end of the video)

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I'll confess I hadn't watched any sumo recently, and had never heard of this guy.   

 

Very entertaining to watch.  He seems to have radar in his feet to be able to stand right on the ring and execute throws and pass-by moves without stepping out first.  I suppose some of that happens because we're watching highlights and not all of his career.   But very impressive. 

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