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How you pronounce Qatar

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Cut-tar is the closest we can come with English sounds.  If you want to nail it, the sound at the beginning requires having your tongue in position to say a "G" like "go", but releasing it without voice like the "c" in "cut".  And the final "r" is produced at the front of the mouth with a slight aspiration similar to the final "r" in Spanish.

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Guest ShannonSofield

Always funny to hear pronunciation debated in a non-native language. Use your own language's common pronunciation. In English, it would be Ka-Tar.

 

Think of the Capitol of France, did you think Pa-riss? Or Pa-ree? Pa-ree is correct in French, but Pa-riss is correct in common English.

 

Tomato - Tomato.

Edited by ShannonSofield

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Second hand anecdotal evidence:

 

My friend lived there for a year and he pronounced it closer to "gutter."

I speak Arabic...it's obviously from Arabic.  The closest we can come with English sounds, as others have said, is KA-tar or CUT-tar. But clearly there are a variety of ways you'll hear people, even journalists or scholars, pronounce the attempted transliteration, "Qatar", from the original Arabic.

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Always funny to hear pronunciation debated in a non-native language. Use your own language's common pronunciation. In English, it would be Ka-Tar.

 

Think of the Capitol of France, did you think Pa-riss? Or Pa-ree? Pa-ree is correct in French, but Pa-riss is correct in common English.

 

Tomato - Tomato.

 

Exactly right.

 

"The Eiffel Tower" is perfectly fine for English Speakers the world over. But in Paris, it's "Lah-tour eh-fell."

 

Both right. There is no such thing as a single 'correct' pronunciation when translating between languages.

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Exactly right.

 

"The Eiffel Tower" is perfectly fine for English Speakers the world over. But in Paris, it's "Lah-tour eh-fell."

 

Both right. There is no such thing as a single 'correct' pronunciation when translating between languages.

Which is why I thought it was stupid when NBC decided to refer the 2006 Winter Olympics as being held in "Torino, Italy", using the Italian word for the city but the English word for the country. It would be the same as calling it Turin, Italia. Not to mention the locals pronounces it like Turin, or Turi. Basically NBC just sucks is what I'm saying. 

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