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Video Rights and TV contracts - FLO/Track

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This topic came up quite awhile ago, but I still am not sure how this all works. When Flo (or Track) streams a HS or College tournament you have to be a paying member to watch the videos. Who does Flo/Track pay to get the rights to broadcast? If it's a high school tournament do they have to have permission from parents to film and stream the matches of their kids - since they are minors? In college situations will kids start filing lawsuits that Flo is in fact making money off of them (see O'Bannon vs E.A. Sports NCAA Basketball)? If they film a match and put it on their site to watch later (for paying customers), do they now own that video of those two wrestlers? If so, does that mean that now that wrestler cannot use the footage  in a video technician series that they produce themselves? I know there are a lot of questions here, but unless the wrestlers themselves get paid (which cannot happen as amateurs), then I am not sure how video services are getting by without lawsuits. 

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In college, the broadcast rights are licensed through either the NCAA (such as in championships) or individual conferences, or potentially your academic institution, depending on the event. When you play sports for a college, you agree that the rights to the footage are covered as a condition of your participation.

 

I'm not a lawyer, but I believe the O'Bannon vs. EA lawsuit argued that incorporating someone's likeness into a videogame goes far beyond just capturing footage of a game. It was going too far in exploiting someone's likeness. But obviously, the question of payments to student athletes is far from settled law, so it is still an open/ongoing question.

 

I'm not sure how it works in high school. Whole other can of worms?

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In college, the broadcast rights are licensed through either the NCAA (such as in championships) or individual conferences, or potentially your academic institution, depending on the event. When you play sports for a college, you agree that the rights to the footage are covered as a condition of your participation.

 

I'm not a lawyer, but I believe the O'Bannon vs. EA lawsuit argued that incorporating someone's likeness into a videogame goes far beyond just capturing footage of a game. It was going too far in exploiting someone's likeness. But obviously, the question of payments to student athletes is far from settled law, so it is still an open/ongoing question.

 

I'm not sure how it works in high school. Whole other can of worms?

So when there is a college tournament or dual that is carried live on FLO, has FLO paid the NCAA or the conference (or both) to stream the even?  So have they purchased the rights and does the NCAA or conference retain any rights? 

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I don't have inside knowledge on Flo-specific contracts, but it would be an industry standard to buy an exclusive license so that nobody else can commercially exploit it. Otherwise that would leave a loophole letting competitors in too, and damaging an investment.

 

Also in Flo's case they are probably buying rights to events that are not covered by the existing NCAA or conference agreements, such as privately run tournaments.

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This topic came up quite awhile ago, but I still am not sure how this all works. When Flo (or Track) streams a HS or College tournament you have to be a paying member to watch the videos. Who does Flo/Track pay to get the rights to broadcast? If it's a high school tournament do they have to have permission from parents to film and stream the matches of their kids - since they are minors? In college situations will kids start filing lawsuits that Flo is in fact making money off of them (see O'Bannon vs E.A. Sports NCAA Basketball)? If they film a match and put it on their site to watch later (for paying customers), do they now own that video of those two wrestlers? If so, does that mean that now that wrestler cannot use the footage  in a video technician series that they produce themselves? I know there are a lot of questions here, but unless the wrestlers themselves get paid (which cannot happen as amateurs), then I am not sure how video services are getting by without lawsuits. 

you've watched college, high school or little league sports on the tv and/or internet before, yes? I think it's safe to assume it works the same way for Flo/Track as it does every other broadcast media company. 

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Likely not too much different than ESPN or FoxSports or a regional like Fox-Ok, -Sw, etc. In the case of OSU it appears they have contract with both Fox & Flo to share broadcasting.

 

For a high school local, regional, national tournament event they've probably contracted with the event coordinator. Perhaps not too much different than your local HS contacting with a local Subway franchise to sell sandwiches at their tourney. They aren't going to allow a visiting team to see JJ sandwiches at the tournament.

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I don't have inside knowledge on Flo-specific contracts, but it would be an industry standard to buy an exclusive license so that nobody else can commercially exploit it. Otherwise that would leave a loophole letting competitors in too, and damaging an investment.

 

Also in Flo's case they are probably buying rights to events that are not covered by the existing NCAA or conference agreements, such as privately run tournaments.

 

I haven't seen the contracts but I use Flo software (I guess I'm considered a partner in that sense). From what I hear, when Flo videos, they pay the hosts. To my knowledge, the only events that anyone would pay the NCAA would be the NCAAs and the regional qualifier but not the other conferences.

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Track seems to be a little bit different than Flo in that they are only a reseller for the event organizer.  Their cut appears to be $1 plus 10% of each sale, where organizer sets the price.  In this model, their premium membership doesn't include any free video coverage.

 

Here's an "about" page on their service:

 

http://s200.trackwrestling.com/tw/AboutTrackcast.jsp?TIM=1484542653692

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Not positive, but I believe Flo decides which events they film. Then they pay the event- might not be a ton but I haven't heard anyone say they paid Flo. I expect it might be possible if the JSS in Ak projected basically no subscriptions and they asked Flo, Flo might need to recoup the expenses.

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Not positive, but I believe Flo decides which events they film. Then they pay the event- might not be a ton but I haven't heard anyone say they paid Flo. I expect it might be possible if the JSS in Ak projected basically no subscriptions and they asked Flo, Flo might need to recoup the expenses.

There have been a few tournaments that I have seen live streamed that I was very suspect on Flo paying them to video. I could be 100% wrong. Maybe if they go through FloArena there is a better chance they will live stream it at a low cost? 

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So if a high school or college match is being live-streamed on Flo, track, or ESPN3, could a person get in trouble for providing their own live Facebook stream for free?

 

If the local high school has an arrangement with the local Subway for concession sandwiches, could you get in trouble for giving away Jimmy John sandwiches at the tournament/event?

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