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BigTenFanboy

When does a person stop being considered a kid....?

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So this forum has had a lot of action today due to the Suriano situation with many people crying foul due to the fact that he may lose a year of competition due to the transfer. A common theme that we hear all the time when these athletes change their minds about a decision/commitment or make a bad decision/mistake is that.. "well you got to remember, they're just kids."

 

So I ask the question.. at what point do people stop being kids and start being adults? I'm of the opinion that people start being adults when they turn 18 and leave high school. When are people supposed to be held accountable for their decisions and mistakes? When does the excuse of "they're just kids" no longer fly?

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So this forum has had a lot of action today due to the Suriano situation with many people crying foul due to the fact that he may lose a year of competition due to the transfer. A common theme that we hear all the time when these athletes change their minds about a decision/commitment or make a bad decision/mistake is that.. "well you got to remember, they're just kids."

 

So I ask the question.. at what point do people stop being kids and start being adults? I'm of the opinion that people start being adults when they turn 18 and leave high school. When are people supposed to be held accountable for their decisions and mistakes? When does the excuse of "they're just kids" no longer fly?

Here's your answer.

 

Edited by Billyhoyle

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The real answer is everyone is different but if you make your decision while still living with Mom and Dad you've never had to make life impacting decisions before you are still a kid.

 

Some people get there younger because life forces them too or they get there on their own and others don't

 

Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

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So this forum has had a lot of action today due to the Suriano situation with many people crying foul due to the fact that he may lose a year of competition due to the transfer. A common theme that we hear all the time when these athletes change their minds about a decision/commitment or make a bad decision/mistake is that.. "well you got to remember, they're just kids."

 

So I ask the question.. at what point do people stop being kids and start being adults? I'm of the opinion that people start being adults when they turn 18 and leave high school. When are people supposed to be held accountable for their decisions and mistakes? When does the excuse of "they're just kids" no longer fly?

he didn't kill anyone or rape anyone or deal drugs. his 'mistake' and the kid vs adult argument are pretty mild in comparison.

 

it's just college wrestling.

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he didn't kill anyone or rape anyone or deal drugs. his 'mistake' and the kid vs adult argument are pretty mild in comparison.

 

it's just college wrestling.

This post isn't really about Suriano at all, but more of a social commentary in general.

When the whole Minnesota drug dealing situation went down some people were saying "theyre just kids." That mistake took us down a path that ended up costing JRob his job!

 

When ever a drinking situation takes place and goes bad you hear people say, "they're just kids." It's a common justification that you hear often when dealing with young adults. Heck I even heard it during the Brock Allen Turner rape case. You hear it with small issues as well as big issues. So I'm asking where is that line and where is it cut off? I know it's more of an individual thing, just curious where people stand when it comes to this stuff.

 

As for Suriano, I am hoping he gets his waiver and does not lose any time. I am rooting for him to win NCAAs in a Rutgers singlet.

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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The real world often kicks you in the face. I lost both my parents at a young age. The real world has been slapping me around ever since. I've learned to kick back and learn how to deal with things. Soriano needs to take this like a man. Failure is a great teacher.

 

Just curious, how old was Soriano when he signed his letter of intent? Was he held back in school like many athletes were? If so, he was probably 18 when he signed.

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Hard to add anything that hasn't already been said.  It's all relative.  I know people in their 60s who are still "kids."  I know "kids" in their teens who are more adult than those twice and three times their age.  Regarding Suriano, it seems he's got buyer's regret--anyone out there who claims not to have felt that at least once in life, as Mudflap would say, "I'll call you a liar."  For those who control the path of Suriano's future, they can say, "You know, he's a great kid with great potential but this just isn't the fit for him, he gave it a great effort but it didn't work out like either of us thought, good luck, see if you can find what you're after at Rutgers (or Rider or Oklahoma, etc.)" or they can say "You made a commitment, you took up time and resource and now you're ditching us, sorry, but you hurt us and now we'll hurt you and you're going to pay a price for that."  Those who control the path of his future are also subject to the whole "kid" assessment as well (like when you add/drop his name from the roster on an hourly basis of late).  "Kids" are usually rash, impulsive, vindictive, self-centered, short-sighted, impetuous, selfish, etc.  In the end, whatever the outcome, we'll see the full scope of who the "kids" are in the Suriano saga.

Edited by Coach_J

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Hard to add anything that hasn't already been said.  It's all relative.  I know people in their 60s who are still "kids."  I know "kids" in their teens who are more adult than those twice and three times their age.  Regarding Suriano, it seems he's got buyer's regret--anyone out there who claims not to have felt that at least once in life, as Mudflap would say, "I'll call you a liar."  For those who control the path of Suriano's future, they can say, "You know, he's a great kid with great potential but this just isn't the fit for him, he gave it a great effort but it didn't work out like either of us thought, good luck, see if you can find what you're after at Rutgers (or Rider or Oklahoma, etc.)" or they can say "You made a commitment, you took up time and resource and now you're ditching us, sorry, but you hurt us and now we'll hurt you and you're going to pay a price for that."  Those who control the path of his future are also subject to the whole "kid" assessment as well (like when you add/drop his name from the roster on an hourly basis of late).  "Kids" are usually rash, impulsive, vindictive, self-centered, short-sighted, impetuous, selfish, etc.  In the end, whatever the outcome, we'll see the full scope of who the "kids" are in the Suriano saga.

 

Exactly, but when that person in their 60's makes a mistake you will be hard pressed to find someone jump to their defense by saying "He's just a kid" regardless of how socially undeveloped or immature they may be. Its very subjective but in many ways it comes down to an individual person's value judgement system... Whats more important? The person getting what they want and their feelings... or if the rules by principle supersede a person's desires/feelings.

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Exactly, but when that person in their 60's makes a mistake you will be hard pressed to find someone jump to their defense by saying "He's just a kid" regardless of how socially undeveloped or immature they may be. Its very subjective but in many ways it comes down to an individual person's value judgement system... Whats more important? The person getting what they want and their feelings... or if the rules by principle supersede a person's desires/feelings.

The 60 year old "kid" rarely motivates us to treat him/her like a kid, i.e., reserve judgment, give a pass or second chance, refrain from condemnation.  Why?  They've had enough time and experience to put on their bigboy pants if they choose. Someone still in college is by nature still a work in progress--they're literally still learning.  In the realm of athletics, by this age they should have learned the basics of conduct (showing up to practice, how to act with sportsmanship, etc.).  Bigger issues can take far longer and, as one poster above mentioned, often involve failure.  Suriano is in such a place now.  I don't think his feelings matter--his future does.  If he's given all he could to the coaches, competed hard and even competed injured, been to practice and given max effort, gone to class and maintained his eligibility, he's done his job.  If the school, the program, his teammates, his coaches, etc., aren't what he expected--and remember, when a 17-19 year old signs a NLI he's basing his choice on expectations that he can really only guess at until he's experienced it firsthand--I feel he should be granted a release outright.  If on the other hand he's repeatedly broken team rules, skipped out on practice, failed classes, placed partying, women, fighting, etc., above his commitment to wrestle and study, then it's time to sit out a year of competition until the priorities can be learned.

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What is the difference? His parent had to sign the LOI too if I am not mistaken.

The point(which I really don't care about either way) is that he would have made the decision as a young kid.  Now that he has grown older, he obviously regretted that decision.  Just because his parents may have signed the LOI wouldn't change his age/maturity at the time of that decision.

 

PSU or PoDunk State,  I support allowing nearly unconditional transfers, especially when making sure the kid can still get his 4 years of competition.  This is even moreso in Suriano's case since he already had one cut short due to injury.  The only time a conditional would be in a case like UofM-tOSU where they are bitter rivals, or in a case like this season where his going to tOSU could definitely impact their chances of winning.

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Unconditional transfers would create chaos. I would not support them.

 

And take note, PSU fans, nor detractors, gave a crap when Cortez faced the exact same rule. There is a blatant hypocrisy with this forum.

That is pure BS, most didn't give their opinions because it wasn't remotely as impactful as the Suriano situation.  However, I will CLEARLY STATE that if Cortez had a RS to use, he should have been able to use it to not lose a year.

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That is pure BS, most didn't give their opinions because it wasn't remotely as impactful as the Suriano situation.  However, I will CLEARLY STATE that if Cortez had a RS to use, he should have been able to use it to not lose a year.

 

The purpose of the rule is the detract athletes from transferring from program to program as well as keep coaches from poaching other teams rosters. How is allowing an athlete to use their redshirt going to detract this from happening?

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That is pure BS, most didn't give their opinions because it wasn't remotely as impactful as the Suriano situation.  However, I will CLEARLY STATE that if Cortez had a RS to use, he should have been able to use it to not lose a year.

 

 

Trust me, if the shoe were on the other foot and a totally high profile guy were leaving Iowa to go to Nebraska this would all suddenly be "But you don't know the whole story" real quick. 

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Trust me, if the shoe were on the other foot and a totally high profile guy were leaving Iowa to go to Nebraska this would all suddenly be "But you don't know the whole story" real quick. 

 

Well there you go, never mind.  Psychic powers have weighed in.

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