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If an athlete has already taken his / her redshirt year, what criteria is required to be granted a potential sixth year of eligibility, for a medical redshirt? Surgery required? Extent of injury? Rehabilitation time? Who also decides this, NCAA? Any info would help, just curious.

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If an athlete has already taken his / her redshirt year, what criteria is required to be granted a potential sixth year of eligibility, for a medical redshirt? Surgery required? Extent of injury? Rehabilitation time? Who also decides this, NCAA? Any info would help, just curious.

 

Hey, let's keep the questions short and simple on our first post, OK, Mr. scsu136?

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If an athlete has already taken his / her redshirt year, what criteria is required to be granted a potential sixth year of eligibility, for a medical redshirt? Surgery required? Extent of injury? Rehabilitation time? Who also decides this, NCAA? Any info would help, just curious.

 

I know none of the fine print stuff, but if the redshirt year they took was simply for development and not because of an injury that 6th year will be likely not be given. 

Edited by Gantry

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As I understand it, a "redshirt" is applied for following a season (not prior).  If the athlete has not received any unauthorized support from the university to compete, and didn't represent the university in an official capacity for any competitions, one redshirt is automatically granted, thus the 5 to compete 4 rule.  However, if during that "redshirt" season, the university documents that injuries prevented the athlete from competing beyond the allowable limits, AND then a second season is lost to documented injuries as well, following the 5 year window, the university may apply for a "medical redshirt" which would then allow a 6th year to compete, if approved. 2 years of documented injuries must have occurred and the 6th year is far from guaranteed, but proper documentation is the key.  It doesn't matter if one of those seasons was the designated "redshirt" season or not.  2 season-ending injuries, providing the athlete hasn't exceeded the allowable number of matches, qualifies for applying for the 6th year.  

 

I had a long conversation with Coach Smith about Miklus on this topic.  According to him, Miklus had injuries during his "redshirt" year that he thinks will qualify him for a 6th year after the conclusion of this season, but one can never be sure if the NCAA will agree.

Edited by tigerfan9311

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Here's my simple explanations (followed by citations from the NCAA Manual below):

https://www.ncaapublications.com/p-4511-2017-2018-ncaa-division-i-manual-august-version-available-august-2017.aspx

 

Redshirt: leveraging your allowable one year of non-attached (wrestling term) competition, within the 5-Year Rule guideline

 

Medical Redshirt (or more appropriately, Medical Hardship): allowing an athlete, whom has not year used a RS, that competed in a small number of events to use what began as a non-RS year to become a RS year due to injury. Still working within the 5-Year Rule

 

Five Year Waiver: allowing an athlete to compete beyond their 5th year, due to extenuating circumstances.

------------------

 

NCAA Manual citations for each of the above are as follows (with examples)...

 

Redshirt

 

 

Examples: most Division I collegiate wrestlers

12.8.1 Five-Year Rule. A student-athlete shall complete his or her seasons of participation within five calendar

years from the beginning of the semester or quarter in which the student-athlete first registered for a minimum

full-time program of studies in a collegiate institution, with time spent in the armed services, on official religious

missions or with recognized foreign aid services of the U.S. government being excepted. For international students,

service in the armed forces or on an official religious mission of the student’s home country is considered

equivalent to such service in the United States. (Revised: 4/2/10, 7/31/14)

Exceptions to the Five-Year Rule include (paraphrased from the NCAA manual):

  • Military Service
  • Religious Missions
  • Academic Study Abroad
  • Internship / Co-Op Education Work Experience
  • Pregnancy
  • Athletics Waiver (aka, Olympic Redshirt)
  • Five-Year Rule Waiver (see below)
Medical Redshirt (or more appropriately, Medical Hardship)

 

 

 

 

Examples: Logan Stieber (5-3 as an attached wrestler during his Frosh season); Jordan Burroughs (7-1 in Senior season)

Jordan Burroughs

2009-10 (Senior/Medical Redshirt)

Regular Season

Burroughs was off to a dominating 7-0 start with four bonus-point wins when his season came to a sudden end on Dec. 19 vs. Central Michigan. Wrestling No. 13 Steve Brown, Burroughs tore his left PCL and LCL in the first period. He finished the match, but dropped a 3-2 overtime decision that broke his streak of 44 consecutive wins. The injured Burroughs was ranked No. 1 at the time of the injury. In the first dual of the season, Burroughs pinned Wisconsin's Greg Burke in 25 seconds, the fastest fall by a Husker in the Big 12 era. He did not finish the Las Vegas Invitational due to a tooth injury that occurred during a first-round win.

 

12.8.4 Hardship Waiver. A student-athlete may be granted an additional year of competition by the conference

or the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement for reasons of “hardship.” Hardship is defined as

an incapacity resulting from an injury or illness that has occurred under all of the following conditions: (Revised:

1/10/92 effective 8/1/92, 1/14/97, 8/1/97, 4/26/01 effective 8/1/01, 11/1/01, 4/3/02, 8/8/02, 3/10/04, 5/11/05,

9/18/07, 11/1/07 effective 8/1/08, 4/24/08, 7/31/14)

A. The incapacitating injury or illness occurs in one of the four seasons of intercollegiate competition at any two-year

or four-year collegiate institutions or occurs after the first day of classes in the student-athlete’s senior year

in high school;

B. The injury or illness occurs prior to the first competition of the second half of the playing season that concludes

with the NCAA championship in that sport (see Bylaw 12.8.4.3.4) and results in incapacity to compete

for the remainder of that playing season;

C. In team sports, the injury or illness occurs when the student-athlete has not participated in more than three

contests or dates of competition (whichever is applicable to that sport) or 30 percent (whichever number is

greater) of the institution’s scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition in his or her sport. Only

scheduled or completed competition against outside participants during the playing season that concludes

with the NCAA championship, or, if so designated, during the official NCAA championship playing season

in that sport (e.g., spring baseball, fall soccer), shall be countable under this limitation in calculating both the

number of contests or dates of competition in which the student-athlete has participated and the number of

scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition during that season in the sport. Dates of competition

that are exempted (e.g., alumni contests, foreign team in the United States) from the maximum permissible

number of contests or dates of competition shall count toward the number of contests or dates in which the

student-athlete has participated and the number of scheduled or completed contests or dates of competition

in the season, except for scrimmages and exhibition contests that are specifically identified as such in the

sport’s Bylaw 17 playing and practice season regulations. Scrimmages and exhibition contests that are not

exempted from the maximum permissible number of contests or dates of competition may be excluded from

the calculation only if they are identified as such in the sport’s Bylaw 17 playing and practice season regulations;

and

D. In individual sports, the injury or illness occurs when the student-athlete has not participated in more than

three dates of competition or 30 percent (whichever number is greater) of the maximum permissible number

of dates of competition as set forth in Bylaw 17 plus one date for a conference championship (e.g., gymnastics:

13+1=14, wrestling: 16+1=17), regardless of whether the team participates in the conference championship,

provided the institution is a member of a conference and the conference holds a championship event

in the applicable sport. Dates of competition that are exempted per Bylaw 17 (e.g., alumni contests, foreign

team in the United States) from the maximum permissible number of dates of competition do not count

toward the number of dates in which the student-athlete has participated.

Five Year Waiver

 

Example: James English

http://triblive.com/sports/college/district/5817338-74/english-sanderson-state

YEAR OVERALL 2008-09 Injured - Did Not Wrestle 2009-10 17-7 2010-11 13-4 2011-12 Injured - Did Not Wrestle 2012-13 14-4 2013-14 16-7; NCAA 7th

12.8.1.7 Five-Year Rule Waiver. The Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement, or its designated committee,

by a two-thirds majority of its members present and voting, may approve waivers of the five-year rule as

it deems appropriate. (Revised: 7/30/10, 7/31/14)

12.8.1.7.1 Waiver Criteria. A waiver of the five-year period of eligibility is designed to provide a studentathlete

with the opportunity to participate in four seasons of intercollegiate competition within a five-year

period. This waiver may be granted, based upon objective evidence, for reasons that are beyond the control

of the student-athlete or the institution, which deprive the student-athlete of the opportunity to participate

for more than one season in his or her sport within the five-year period. The Committee on Student-Athlete

Reinstatement reserves the right to review requests that do not meet the more-than-one-year criteria detailed

in this bylaw for circumstances of extraordinary or extreme hardship. A student-athlete who has exhausted

his or her five years of eligibility may continue to practice (but not compete) for a maximum of 30 consecutive

calendar days, provided the student-athlete’s institution has submitted a waiver request. The studentathlete

may not commence practice until the institution has filed such a request. Further, if such a request

is denied prior to exhausting the 30-day practice period, the student-athlete must cease all practice activities

upon the institution’s notification of the denial. (Revised: 4/17/91, 1/11/94, 8/10/94, 10/12/95, 4/27/00,

7/30/10, 7/31/14)

12.8.1.7.1.1 Circumstances Beyond Control. Circumstances considered to be beyond the control

of the student-athlete or the institution and do not cause a participation opportunity to be used

shall include, but are not limited to, the following: (Adopted: 8/10/94, Revised: 10/12/95, 8/12/97,

1/9/06, 7/30/10, 7/31/14)

A. Situations clearly supported by contemporaneous medical documentation, which states that a

student-athlete is unable to participate in intercollegiate competition as a result of incapacitating

physical or mental circumstances;

B. The student-athlete is unable to participate in intercollegiate athletics as a result of a life-threatening

or incapacitating injury or illness suffered by a member of the student-athlete’s immediate

family, which clearly is supported by contemporaneous medical documentation;

C. Reliance by the student-athlete upon written, contemporaneous, clearly erroneous academic

advice provided to the student-athlete from a specific academic authority from a collegiate institution

regarding the academic status of the student-athlete or prospective student-athlete, which

directly leads to that individual not being eligible to participate and, but for the clearly erroneous

advice, the student-athlete would have established eligibility for intercollegiate competition;

C. Natural disasters (e.g., earthquake, flood); and

E. Extreme financial difficulties as a result of a specific event (e.g., layoff, death in the family)

experienced by the student-athlete or by an individual upon whom the student-athlete is legally

dependent, which prohibit the student-athlete from participating in intercollegiate athletics.

These circumstances must be clearly supported by objective documentation (e.g., decree of

bankruptcy, proof of termination) and must be beyond the control of the student-athlete or the

individual upon whom the student-athlete is legally dependent.

Edited by lu_alum

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I had a long conversation with Coach Smith about Miklus on this topic. According to him, Miklus had injuries during his "redshirt" year that he thinks will qualify him for a 6th year after the conclusion of this season, but one can never be sure if the NCAA will agree.

So we won't know if Miklus has another year of eligibility until AFTER the conclusion of this season ?

 

Is it safe to say that Willie want's the additional year (vs other options) if granted ?

Edited by Show_Me

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Redshirting procrastinates adolescence. Some guys are afraid to move on to the real world. My mantra is, go to college, bust your behind in the classroom, do some rasslin, have some fun, graduate, then either go to grad school or get a real job!

This would do more to bring parity back to college wrestling and would make a profound impact on the schools where it is mandatory to graduate in 4.5 years.

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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C. Natural disasters (e.g., earthquake, flood)

 

John Smith should jump on this one big time and use it to his advantage. Oklahoma now leads California in the number of 2.5 and higher earthquakes per year. John could get a bunch of guys an extra season after one of the weekly/almost daily earthquakes shakes them up.

 

Then, there is this list below. No Peace Corps?

 

Exceptions to the Five-Year Rule include (paraphrased from the NCAA manual):

  • Military Service
  • Religious Missions
  • Academic Study Abroad
  • Internship / Co-Op Education Work Experience
  • Pregnancy
  • Athletics Waiver (aka, Olympic Redshirt)
  • Five-Year Rule Waiver (see below)
Edited by WillieBoy

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Not paraphrased.

 

12.8.1.2 Service Exceptions to the Five-Year Rule. Time spent in the armed services, on official religious missions or with recognized foreign aid services of the U.S. government is excepted from the application of the five-year rule. Among such services that qualify a student-athlete for an extension of the five-year rule are: (Revised: 4/2/10, 7/31/14) (a) Military Sea Transport Service; (b) Peace Corps; or © Service as a conscientious objector ordered by the Selective Service Commission (or the equivalent authority in a foreign nation) in lieu of active military duty. 

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Redshirting procrastinates adolescence. Some guys are afraid to move on to the real world. My mantra is, go to college, bust your behind in the classroom, do some rasslin, have some fun, graduate, then either go to grad school or get a real job!

 

What do you care?  It's their life, let them do what they want.

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C. Natural disasters (e.g., earthquake, flood)

 

John Smith should jump on this one big time and use it to his advantage. Oklahoma now leads California in the number of 2.5 and higher earthquakes per year. John could get a bunch of guys an extra season after one of the weekly/almost daily earthquakes shakes them up.

 

Then, there is this list below. No Peace Corps?

 

Exceptions to the Five-Year Rule include (paraphrased from the NCAA manual):

  • Military Service
  • Religious Missions
  • Academic Study Abroad
  • Internship / Co-Op Education Work Experience
  • Pregnancy
  • Athletics Waiver (aka, Olympic Redshirt)
  • Five-Year Rule Waiver (see below)

 

 

I believe "Religious Missions" should be scrubbed from that list. Maybe even Military Service. Gives too big an advantage when guys are 24 years old competing against a bunch of 19 year olds. Military Service is understandable, we don't want to discourage people from serving in the military when we might be at war. I have no idea what benefit "Religious Missions" brings to the party for our nation.

Edited by TobusRex

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So a somewhat level playing field on the D1 level doesn't interest you in the slightest bit?

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

 

How does getting one extra year for medical reasons, when you have missed a season due to injury, make the playing level unfair? Same number of competitive seasons. 

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I believe "Religious Missions" should be scrubbed from that list. Maybe even Military Service. Gives too big an advantage when guys are 24 years old competing against a bunch of 19 year olds. Military Service is understandable, we don't want to discourage people from serving in the military when we might be at war. I have no idea what benefit "Religious Missions" brings to the party for our nation.

The problem is freedom of reglion is one of the pillars on which this country was founded. If religious missions it were removed you would see advocates make the claim that the NCAA was not providing an equal educational environment and impeding ones right to practice thier religous beliefs. This isnt my stance, i just see this coming about.

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There is a reasonable compromise on Religious missions. 6-year clock.

 

You do a two year mission, you come home and get 4 years to Compete. That would mean Brown of PSU could not have won NCAA in seventh year out. Fine. And if a religious authority says the two year mission is January to January, he screws the kid to only 3 years of eligibility. Well, the bishop, or whatever needs to see the real world. Apparently Kade Moss of PSU had eligibility for an 8th year out of HS because of his 2 year mission overlapping 3 school years. Then he had a redshirt year. Then 3 years of competition. Would he have wrestled in year 8 had Keener not come in and Cortez not gone up to 141. 

 

Don't tell me these guys are not training on the mission. Not competing or doing live wrestling practice, but weights and conditioning, yeah. And healing. 

Edited by RichB

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There is a reasonable compromise on Religious missions. 6-year clock.

 

You do a two year mission, you come home and get 4 years to Compete. That would mean Brown of PSU could not have won NCAA in seventh year out. Fine. And if a religious authority says the two year mission is January to January, he screws the kid to only 3 years of eligibility. Well, the bishop, or whatever needs to see the real world. Apparently Kade Moss of PSU had eligibility for an 8th year out of HS because of his 2 year mission overlapping 3 school years. Then he had a redshirt year. Then 3 years of competition. Would he have wrestled in year 8 had Keener not come in and Cortez not gone up to 141. 

 

Don't tell me these guys are not training on the mission. Not competing or doing live wrestling practice, but weights and conditioning, yeah. And healing.

 

There's no way anyone could be forced to stop lifting weights and exercising on their own.

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Don't tell me these guys are not training on the mission. Not competing or doing live wrestling practice, but weights and conditioning, yeah. And healing. 

 

My understanding is that the state 285 champ Bradley from Nazareth a few years ago (2013?) came back about 30-40 pounds lighter.

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I have heard some Latter Days "folks" state that that the guys don't have time to train. A K Moss article contradicts that. He said he was able to run and do calisthenics.  Obviously you can do those anywhere. One might not be able to lift in a third world country, but a lot of missionary work is in first world countries..

 

Bradley originally signed with Iowa. He is not on the roster after returning.

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Thanks for the information on Peace Corps service and the like.

 

As for two years out as a recruiter for Religious Cults - it is not an advantage for sports in any respect other than maybe healing from some nagging injuries.

 

The 'you come back more mature and better prepared' doesn't really wash. To date the mormon missionaries who have returned and competed in D1 wrestling have won one NCAA Title. Brown at Penn State. No others have won a title.

 

If you are going to perform at the highest levels two years off doesn't help in any sport.

 

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Thanks for the information on Peace Corps service and the like.

 

As for two years out as a recruiter for Religious Cults - it is not an advantage for sports in any respect other than maybe healing from some nagging injuries.

 

The 'you come back more mature and better prepared' doesn't really wash. To date the mormon missionaries who have returned and competed in D1 wrestling have won one NCAA Title. Brown at Penn State. No others have won a title.

 

If you are going to perform at the highest levels two years off doesn't help in any sport.

Did Aaron Holker take a two year mission?

 

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