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Did Lesnar ever wrestle freestyle?

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why does the lesnar faction get to "what if" about technique but no one ever "what ifs" about being a freak athlete?

 

First of all it has nothing to do with being part of a Lesnar faction if such a thing even exists. With Brock Lesnar technique is his missing piece, but I'll jump on your question. If George Carpenter was a super freak athlete like Lesnar I'll be willing to say he probably would have AA'ed this past March. If you turn anyone into a freak athlete they probably will do very well in whatever sport they compete it. Certainly better than they current do now. Kinda sounds like common sense to me which is why no one ever "what ifs" about being a freak athlete.

 

Do you think any athlete in any sport currently competing would actually perform better if their strength, speed, agility, and coordination decreased?

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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I am going to ignore that last question.

 

My point is that it is naive to assume a freak athlete who is modest at learning can learn as well as a modest athlete who is good at learning.

 

Talents aren't all in the biceps.

 

Absolutely, but again all of this is speculation. IF a freak athlete learned good technique he would perform much better. It's not naive at all to make that statement, it's common sense. It's not saying that the athlete is capable of learning that technique. It's naive to believe everyone is capable to learning, but that's not what was being said at all.

 

Do you disagree that if Lesnar learned better technique he would have been a much better wrestler? Or are you going to again ignore this common sense question?

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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No you're right I don't question it, just pointing out that people admire the talents that they can see on the mat and ignore the ones they can't.

 

Cool. Nice to see us being able to have a civil discussion. Progress!

 

In my earlier post I didn't mean to disrespect George Carpenter, but the fact of the matter is he is what many would consider a "room guy" and probably never would have made the lineup had Cortez not get injured. He probably is an outstanding practice partner as hes proven hes very difficult to pin. Thats something like you said many people don't see.

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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I am going to ignore that last question.

 

My point is that it is naive to assume a freak athlete who is modest at learning can learn as well as a modest athlete who is good at learning. 

 

Talents aren't all in the biceps. 

 

I think the difference is that good technique is a learned skill while being a freak athlete is inherent. So with a freak athlete that doesn't have the technique nailed down, in theory its possible to teach them that technique.  Whereas someone with good technique and no athletic abilities cannot necessarily increase his athletic capacity in the same manner.  

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In a couple of instances pretty much 99% of people who aren't Brock Lesnar would have given up points where he managed to avoid getting scored on.

Probably greater than 99%. More like 99.999%

 

It's getting redundant but Brock Lesnar is a freak of nature. The typical rules of technique didn't apply to him due to his being such a freak athlete. His size, strength, and athleticism is something you can't teach.

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You definitely cannot coach the natural ability he had. However given that I don't think he would have made a world or Olympic team. Too many guys at that weight then were either just as big and strong or light years ahead in terms of ability. Or both.

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If Lesnar could not even make 3rd string in the NFL what  a freak Neal must have been to become a pro bowler and super bowl champ. And given the fact they wrestled in the NCAA finals was truly special looking back on it.

 

The 1999 NCAA Final turned out to be two of the biggest success stories to come out of the collegiate wrestling world to make it in the mainstream world. On one side you have a future World Champion Freestyle wrestler and NFL Pro bowler, Superbowl Champion and on the other side you have a future UFC World Champion and WWE Championship Superstar wrestler. 

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The 1999 NCAA Final turned out to be two of the biggest success stories to come out of the collegiate wrestling world to make it in the mainstream world. On one side you have a future World Champion Freestyle wrestler and NFL Pro bowler, Superbowl Champion and on the other side you have a future UFC World Champion and WWE Championship Superstar wrestler. 

Neal was a very solid OL.  Pretty sure he never made the Pro Bowl, even though he may have been good enough.  If he did make it, it was probably due to starters backing out. 

 

In fact, Neal only started 16 games once in his career.  Very good player, but not a pro bowler.

 

Haselrig, did however, make the pro bowl.

Edited by AHamilton

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Neal was a very solid OL.  Pretty sure he never made the Pro Bowl, even though he may have been good enough.  If he did make it, it was probably due to starters backing out. 

 

In fact, Neal only started 16 games once in his career.  Very good player, but not a pro bowler.

 

Haselrig, did however, make the pro bowl.

 

I misread the stat. He was 2nd Team All Pro in 2009. I apologize for the error.

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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I misread the stat. He was 2nd Team All Pro in 2009. I apologize for the error.

All-pro is very impressive, I wasn't aware.  He only played 12 games that year, though.

 

It is funny: here in New England, he was never really viewed as an elite talent by most of the fans--- solid and dependable, yes. You never really heard much about him.

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All-pro is very impressive, I wasn't aware.  He only played 12 games that year, though.

 

It is funny: here in New England, he was never really viewed as an elite talent by most of the fans--- solid and dependable, yes. You never really heard much about him.

 

To the football purist I can see that. From us wrestling fanboys he is one of our heroes. And in New England I guess its tough to standout when you've got guys like Tom Brady.

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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To the football purist I can see that. From us wrestling fanboys he is one of our heroes. And in New England I guess its tough to standout when you've got guys like Tom Brady.

I agree.  I used to watch him specifically on plays.  When they talked OL up here, it was usually guys like Logan Mankins and Matt Light.  Neal was never complained about, just not a standout, except to guys like us.  Freddie Smerlas (dominant state New England wrestling champ and one of the best NT ever to play football) seemed to really like him, if I remember correctly.

Edited by AHamilton

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Neal is the reason that what's his bucket is still playing.  If not for Neal, he would have been sacked too many time.  Neal was good at protecting the quarterback.  Plus he was a world champion wrestler. 

 

mspart

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Also there is this:

 

http://www.patriots.com/news/2016/06/06/ufcs-brock-lesnar-no-stephen-neal

 

Neal then signed with the Patriots in 2001 despite not having played football since high school in San Diego. After training camp he spent time on the Eagles practice squad before signing with New England’s active roster that December. He was inactive for all six games that year, including Super Bowl XXXVI. By 2002 Neal was in line for a starting job at guard, unfortunately he suffered a shoulder injury on a heady play in his first career start against the Packers as he tried to recover a New England fumble. The injury would sideline him for the rest of 2002 as well as 2003.

 

After that, Neal would go on to start 81 of 86 games played for the Patriots before his retirement after the 2010 season. He collected his second Super Bowl ring, this time in his first year as a starter in 2004, in the XXXIX victory over the Eagles.

 

Bill Belichick often jokes that Neal didn’t know how to put his pads on or how to find the practice field when he arrived in New England. After first seeing some time as a defensive lineman, he became an athletically gifted guard and core leader of the Patriots offensive line. It’s hard to imagine just how good of a football player Neal could have been with some college experience and were it not for the injuries he battled throughout his career....

 

Neal is legitimately one of the greatest all-around athletes to have passed through the Patriots dynasty in Foxborough. Oh, and he just happened to be one of the nicest men to make his way through New England as well.

 

mspart

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Neal is the reason that what's his bucket is still playing.  If not for Neal, he would have been sacked too many time.  Neal was good at protecting the quarterback.  Plus he was a world champion wrestler. 

 

mspart

 

Wasn't he a RG?  Not many big-time pass rushing threats (outside of blitzes) that the RG has to pick up.  A RG has responsibilities, but not like a LT.

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http://www.nbcsports.com/boston/new-england-patriots/best-belichick-era-number-32-stephen-neal

 

When Neal retired before the 2011 season, Belichick said in a statement, "They don't come any better than Steve Neal. In terms of improvement and development as a player, Steve may have accomplished more than any player I have ever been around. His toughness, intelligence and competitiveness were at rare levels and all contributed to him going from being a champion in an individual sport to being an integral part of championship teams. I congratulate Steve for an incredible career and thank him for everything he did for me personally, our team and organization."

 

mspart

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http://www.nbcsports.com/boston/new-england-patriots/best-belichick-era-number-32-stephen-neal

 

When Neal retired before the 2011 season, Belichick said in a statement, "They don't come any better than Steve Neal. In terms of improvement and development as a player, Steve may have accomplished more than any player I have ever been around. His toughness, intelligence and competitiveness were at rare levels and all contributed to him going from being a champion in an individual sport to being an integral part of championship teams. I congratulate Steve for an incredible career and thank him for everything he did for me personally, our team and organization."

 

mspart

 

That may be the longest sentence Belichick ever uttered aloud.

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