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Scratch weight


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#1 cmsu34

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 07:22 AM

Is making scratch weight 1 time before districts a NFHS rule or a state rule? I was told you don't have to make scratch in Ca.
Thanks in advance

#2 SetonHallPirate

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 09:46 AM

As best as I can tell, cmsu34, there is no rule that wrestlers have to make scratch at least once prior to the state tournament series in California.


Edited by SetonHallPirate, 24 December 2017 - 09:46 AM.

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#3 Zebra

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 10:29 AM

State by state rule. 



#4 cmsu34

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Posted 24 December 2017 - 12:30 PM

great thanks guys, Merry Christmas!

#5 cbg

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 07:54 AM

Some states have a rule that a wrestler must COMPETE in 50% or 75% of their regular season matches at the weight with which they will compete in for the state tournament series.  I say compete because one state changed the rule due to a wrestler making weight but not wrestling due to being sucked down and feeling poorly.  



#6 RichB

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 07:12 AM

in 1965-66, my Jr year, my HS wrestled 13 duals, No tournaments. Another 165 pounder came back from a pre-season injury, to beat me in wrestle-offs after the 7th meet. After the next match I didn't get the spot back, and figured. I asked to wrestle-off at 154 where I had intended to go before both 165s got hurt in a scrimmage. Or to go up against the 180, who was pretty bad. I was told no, because I had already competed in a majority of matches at 165.

 

I almost quite the sport in disgust. (Then I decided we could be good the next year and I could take the 180 spot.)

 

This rule is idiotic. ~"I am sorry, you can't move your guard to center for the playoffs despite the regular guy's injury"~.

 

(in Pennsylvania, this rule is gone 40+ years)


Edited by RichB, 19 January 2018 - 07:13 AM.


#7 gimpeltf

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 07:21 AM

in 1965-66, my Jr year, my HS wrestled 13 duals, No tournaments. Another 165 pounder came back from a pre-season injury, to beat me in wrestle-offs after the 7th meet. After the next match I didn't get the spot back, and figured. I asked to wrestle-off at 154 where I had intended to go before both 165s got hurt in a scrimmage. Or to go up against the 180, who was pretty bad. I was told no, because I had already competed in a majority of matches at 165.

 

I almost quite the sport in disgust. (Then I decided we could be good the next year and I could take the 180 spot.)

 

This rule is idiotic. ~"I am sorry, you can't move your guard to center for the playoffs despite the regular guy's injury"~.

 

(in Pennsylvania, this rule is gone 40+ years)

 

 

You were a 154?



#8 davenowa

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 07:37 AM

most states which have a % rule have it worded regarding the MINIMUM weight class you can compete it is based on a percentage of weigh-ins at the lower weight class (and in some cases, the weigh-in only counts if the wrestler COMPETES on that date).  I am unaware of a state where the rule is worded such that it would prevent a wrestler from wrestling up a weight class for the states, as in many cases, a kid can't beat the 120 so goes 126 (but weighs in every day at 120)...or where it would prevent someone who wanted tougher competition during many matches to weigh in at 120 but wrestle frequently at 126.  although the NFHS removed the rule about needing a % at the lowest weight to qualify, many states have maintained it for the following reason:  the NFHS rule regarding weekly weight loss refers to an AVERAGE descent of 1.5% per week, rather than a MONITORED weekly descent.  The difference is that with an AVERAGE descent, there is nothing to prevent a wrestler from weighing in all season at 160, wrestling at 160...and then rapidly dropping to 145 for states, as it would result in an AVERAGE weekly loss within the guidelines, but clearly against the INTENT of the NFHS rule.  In CT, we use a 33% rule.






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