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Year Round Wrestler Killing Sport?

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100% year round wrestling causes kids to quit.  The level of these guys (I was one as well) makes it impossible for lower guys to find success.

 

This issue is what really has numbers down in California.  We have 12 state football champs a year, and even losing teams have a chance at success.  Kids want to be part of a winner.  Is it artificial success?  Yes, but when kids feel they can be competitive and win, they stick with it.  It feels good to win.  Year round wrestlers are making the sport better but influencing numbers IMO.  There are teams in my state who have to opportunity to participate in the dual championships but decline to because there are teams filled with year round wrestlers and they have 0% chance to beat them, so they just opt out.

 

Personally, it doesnt bother me that numbers are down and kids are getting a higher ceiling.  I want us to to the best on the Olympic stage.  If that comes at the cost of some JV or non state placers, I am ok with the sacrifice, but it sucks sitting in the corner with my 1st year freshman who has to square off with the kids I was coaching from other schools in the offseason.

35 years ago "year round" was 8 months with a bit pre and post season lifting. If you were lucky the coach would open the wrestling room one night a week for an hour or so.

 

Things are different now and with the cost of sports (clubs, equipment, competitions) can be financially restrictive for families to fund two or more sports. Some kids are having to make a choice very early in their lives. It may not be right but it is a reality. 

 

I have a friend who's daughter was a very competitive ice skater. Man you think our sport is expensive and time consuming that sport is crazy. 

 

 

So the short answer to the question is, no it's not killing the sport. It is changing it for sure but all sports are going though this specialization phase. In another 10 years it will stabilize to the new normal, whatever that means. 

 

 

Oh and the singlet is not killing it either.    

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Kudos to those posting in this thread. I’ve often struggled with figuring out the right way to be a good dad / mentor. Striking the right balance while at the same time fostering a desire on my son’s part to strive for excellence. That can be a tough conundrum. Don’t want them to give up to easy or to not try hard enough.

 

My son knows I love the sport. And I love love love watching him and his friends in it. Sometimes I worry that he might feel too much pressure from that, even if that is not my intention. So, I have told him straight up, if he chose to leave it or picked another direction I would love him just as much - and I made it clear I was sincere. And I have always said that we do not expect any athletic scholarship.

 

I have fostered multiple sports, but now that he is in HS he is on the track to specialize in wrestling. Getting cut from soccer helped to push that along. Still, he will need time away from wrestling to decompress. But I can see the allure toward year round already. Not sure how that is going to work.

 

Anyway, greatly appreciate these posts. So refreshing to see.

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How many non-elite level athletes are truly "year round" single sport athletes? I think part of the equation is not willing to be top dog in another sport. Example, I know a guy who was known at his high school as the "star athlete" and "big man on campus." He was the running back for the football team, rushed for over 1000 years in his junior and senior seasons respectively, etc. But couldn't hack it at a small D3 college. In the off-season he refused to play other sports because he was "lifting for football." He then came out for baseball and was going to be the 2nd string catcher behind a kid many considered to be a much "inferior" athlete. Quit almost immmediately. Year's later I spoke to him about it and he told me he felt not being the star in other sports made him feel like his star status in football would be diminished if he wasnt the best another sport.

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Kollin Moore was a standout soccer player who scored a ton of goals. Pretty big fella for soccer!

Zain Retherford played soccer for Benton as well. He was allowed to play soccer the year he wasn't allowed to wrestle... go figure...

I looked up Wilcke's bio on the Iowa team site:

 

four-year letterwinner in baseball... lettered three times playing quarterback on the football team... two-time letterman in track and field... 

 

so along with the 4 letters he won in wrestling, that's 13 letters in HS sports. NICE

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I think some of the lamenting about fewer multiple sport athletes is misplaced -- it is not simply that crazy parents ("hockey dads") are making their kids specialize to earn a scholarship (although we have all met these people), it is that sports themselves have changed, and the seasons are much longer and therefore overlap, making it harder to be on multiple teams.  Back in the old days the fall season (football, and maybe cross country) ended a week or so before the winter season (wrestling, and that sport for tall boys with the ball), and that ended a week or so before spring's baseball and track.  This just isn't the case anymore.  In PA a few years ago they chose to officially cut the first week out of all winter sports (wrestling and both boys and girls basketball, and volleyball) because the football playoffs had been extended into so many rounds that it washed deep into the start of the winter season.  The smallest schools complained that their boys couldn't play basketball because they were still in the football playoffs. 

 

Also, wrestling differs from some other sports in that about half of the boys (the lighter half) are too small to play on their team's football or basketball team, and probably too light for hockey.  It is a lot easier for a big kid to play multiple sports since being big is rarely a handicap, except maybe gymnastics. 

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Year round wrestling killing the sport?

I think it forces a lot of average kids to bite the bullet earlier and drop out of the sport.

Kids realize by 6th grade if they are competitive or just simply wrestling.

Track assigns a value to you.

 

Not everybody is going to be a state champ.  And not every state champ is going to be an All American.  If you think wrestling is a positive influence on young kids (and I do) then average kids dropping out is a negative. 

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Not everybody is going to be a state champ.  And not every state champ is going to be an All American.  If you think wrestling is a positive influence on young kids (and I do) then average kids dropping out is a negative. 

But for that to be a true negative they will have to drop from all sports as baseball, soccer, swimming, gymnastics (all the recent bad press aside), etc. all have the same basic socialistic positive effects. You're argument is essentially an all or nothing argument in an environment where that is not the case.  

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Kollin Moore was a standout soccer player who scored a ton of goals. Pretty big fella for soccer!

Zain Retherford played soccer for Benton as well. He was allowed to play soccer the year he wasn't allowed to wrestle... go figure...

 

Zain may have played soccer but he was very much an all in wrestler. The sat out year was a wrestling decision. His dad spent a small fortune of money he didn't really have on him with Chertow's operation (as he said to me in a rather tense - long story - conversation once), along with camps all summer long, from little guy all through school. Even in the sat out year he wrestled everything else. Super 32 through as well as FS stuff.  Zain wouldn't be a good example of a played "multiple sports" guy. Lots of kids do other things, but the year round priority is sports specific.

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It is difficult to pin point where it all went wrong. But one thing led to another. Started making podium at many “national” 12-14 year old age group. Made Tulsa finals as 8th grader. Then in high school “upset” many upper class man who placed previously. ..... anyway, he is a junior now. We have a VERY strained relationship. Don’t talk at all. It’s very depressing.

 

Again , I take full responsibility— we traveled all over the United States hitting every tournament possible.

 

Again. My fault. I just wish I could change things

Im convinced you'll get it back.  If it takes time, it'll still be worth it.  Fight for what you believe in.  You believe in your son clearly.  At least you tried to combine two things you love.  I'm confident in you winning your boy back

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Zain may have played soccer but he was very much an all in wrestler. The sat out year was a wrestling decision. His dad spent a small fortune of money he didn't really have on him with Chertow's operation (as he said to me in a rather tense - long story - conversation once), along with camps all summer long, from little guy all through school. Even in the sat out year he wrestled everything else. Super 32 through as well as FS stuff.  Zain wouldn't be a good example of a played "multiple sports" guy. Lots of kids do other things, but the year round priority is sports specific.

 

Zain sitting out was not his decision. The PIAA ruled him ineligible due to transferring from Line Mountain to Benton. As for him not being a good example of playing other sports I disagree due to the simple fact that he played another school sport. You can have a main sport that you focus 90% of your energy on, but adding other sports into the mix during the "off season" helps keep things fresh as well as helps schools field better teams.

These "year round athletes" don't participate in other sports at all and use their main sport as the reason for it.  

Edited by BigTenFanboy

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Zain sitting out was not his decision. The PIAA ruled him ineligible due to transferring from Line Mountain to Benton. As for him not being a good example of playing other sports I disagree due to the simple fact that he played another school sport. You can have a main sport that you focus 90% of your energy on, but adding other sports into the mix during the "off season" helps keep things fresh as well as helps schools field better teams.

These "year round athletes" don't participate in other sports at all and use their main sport as the reason for it.

I wonder what the idiots (PIAA) think of their decision now.

 

Especially since adding the Philly private schools.

 

 

 

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

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They are happy that he learned the lesson they taught him.

What lesson? Only private schools can transfer or do you have to be politically connected?

 

A complete joke of an organization, the PIAA!

 

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

Edited by cjc007

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What lesson? Only private schools can transfer or do you have to be politically connected?

A complete joke of an organization, the PIAA!

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

I gotta agree with you here for the most part, but ask Ryan Vulahk and Conner Hedash how their transfers to private schools worked out for them. I guess with Hedash going to Bethlehem Catholic raises some serious suspicion, but Vulahk to Pope John Paul? Seriously?

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I think Zain played only one year of soccer at Benton and that was more of a ploy with the PIAA.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

Whatever the reason, it certainly makes the PIAA look silly doesn't it? Ruled ineligible for athletic competition, but only for a certain sport? All the more reason to be a 3 sport athlete!

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I think the problem is with small children being specialized. I don’t think there is anything wrong with a freshman or sophomore in high school choosing one sport and specializing in it. Kids know how good they are by that age. There are some that are athletic enough to be special at a few sports and they will play those sports because they are standouts. Nothing wrong with high school kids choosing just one sport to specialize in because they’re clearly better at it.

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I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with a high school athlete deciding to specialize in a sport. I joined wrestling as a freshman and only did wrestling for all four years. I had teammates who did cross country, football, track, etc, all to some varying success in relation to wrestling.

 

I think the problem is when parents have their child do a singular sport to specialize in from a young age. Unless the kid is 1 in 100 who will instantly take to it, more likely than not, the kid is going to burn out, hate the sport, and resent the parent. I had a large man once yell and berate his boy (probably only 5 or 6) and scream "WHAT IS THAT, C'MON WHAT ARE YOU EVEN DOING?" in the middle of the match. That type of behaviour is, more or less, common in youth wrestling, and a huge detriment. I went up to the kid later to say he fought hard and did good, but he just went back to crying. Terrible parenting.

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I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with a high school athlete deciding to specialize in a sport. I joined wrestling as a freshman and only did wrestling for all four years. I had teammates who did cross country, football, track, etc, all to some varying success in relation to wrestling.

 

I think the problem is when parents have their child do a singular sport to specialize in from a young age. Unless the kid is 1 in 100 who will instantly take to it, more likely than not, the kid is going to burn out, hate the sport, and resent the parent. I had a large man once yell and berate his boy (probably only 5 or 6) and scream "WHAT IS THAT, C'MON WHAT ARE YOU EVEN DOING?" in the middle of the match. That type of behaviour is, more or less, common in youth wrestling, and a huge detriment. I went up to the kid later to say he fought hard and did good, but he just went back to crying. Terrible parenting.

 

This!!! Too many bad parents! I see that all of the time. The dads always swear that their kid is "different" and that he "loves wrestling." If you love your kid and love wrestling, find the best club you can, get your kid in it, step aside and let the coaches coach! Win or lose, give the kid a hug and tell them you are proud of them. If they want feedback, they'll ask for it. Otherwise, let the coaches coach. 

Edited by superbowlhomeboy

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Zain sitting out was not his decision. The PIAA ruled him ineligible due to transferring from Line Mountain to Benton. As for him not being a good example of playing other sports I disagree due to the simple fact that he played another school sport. You can have a main sport that you focus 90% of your energy on, but adding other sports into the mix during the "off season" helps keep things fresh as well as helps schools field better teams.

These "year round athletes" don't participate in other sports at all and use their main sport as the reason for it.  

 

I know what happened. One random example of another sport he played given what I said is silly trolling. Go away. 

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This!!! Too many bad parents! I see that all of the time. The dads always swear that their kid is "different" and that he "loves wrestling." If you love your kid and love wrestling, find the best club you can, get your kid in it, step aside and let the coaches coach! Win or lose, give the kid a hug and tell them you are proud of them. If they want feedback, they'll ask for it. Otherwise, let the coaches coach. 

 

This may be an option in the community you live in. Where I lived there was only one coach who would work with the younger than HS kids, and work with the HS kids, in the off season. That was me. The success they had was a lot me. I essentially will never retire because of other peoples kids. Travel, shoes, feeding them, entry fees (poor community), fund raising, pretty much all of it. Don't get me wrong, I am good with doing all of that. Maybe where you live wrestling clubs are on every corner but the closest consistent club I could have put my kid in would have been a six hour round trip. Given it is a non-wrestling culture community in a below average wrestling state, when I left the area competitive wrestling (well as competitive as things get in Arizona) left too. But, when there was a really good training camp, or wrestling camp, I worked them, but stepped away from my kid for the duration. Even those can be hard to find.

Edited by sgallan

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I think the problem is with small children being specialized. I don’t think there is anything wrong with a freshman or sophomore in high school choosing one sport and specializing in it. Kids know how good they are by that age. There are some that are athletic enough to be special at a few sports and they will play those sports because they are standouts. Nothing wrong with high school kids choosing just one sport to specialize in because they’re clearly better at it.

 

I think the general argument is the kids that start at the young age, and specialize, actually knock those with natural ability away from the sport in HS. Think of it like this; you are a good athlete, might have wrestled a bit in JH. You wrestle a kid who is not quite the athlete you are, and get worked. You may not want to stay. I know there are exceptions to this rule but that is often how it works.  

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