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NJDan

Dan Dennis and the Pullup Record

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Kipping is fine, it's only been exaggerated from the hideously ugly form some Crossfitters use when doing kipping pullups. But they are advantageous for efficiency (and so, less "work") than no-kip version.

I don't understand this. We should be looking for ways to make pull-ups harder, not easier.

Damned millennials - always looking for shortcuts!

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Tom Brand's first year at VT the pull up record was 54, held by Reed Carpenter. Guys were joking with Brands that he couldn't beat it, he was wearing a polo and khaki shorts, he took off his polo, did 55 like it was nothing, dropped down and left the weight room.  *Mind Blown*

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I don't understand this. We should be looking for ways to make pull-ups harder, not easier.

Damned millennials - always looking for shortcuts!

 

HA! 

I'm sure someone with an exercise science background could explain the differences between the benefits of slower/fewer reps with better form and more/faster reps with questionable form. Personally, I start off slow then start cheating and swinging after 10-12, but I'm just trying to enter my 40s with healthy joints. I think the slow ones are less likely to injure me initially, but the fast cheating ones get me good and winded, plus they help my pride!

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Obviously he is incredibly strong in the upper body.  Nobody has ever debated that.  But you can't honestly think the missing leg doesn't have much to do with how many pull ups he can do.

 

It plays a part in it but I think his massively strong upper body has more to do with it.  I'm sure if you attached a 30 lb weight to him it would make his pull up number dip only slightly.  

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It plays a part in it but I think his massively strong upper body has more to do with it. I'm sure if you attached a 30 lb weight to him it would make his pull up number dip only slightly.

I agree that the lack of a leg can help significantly with bodyweight exercises like pullups, but 70+ reps of ANY compound exercise is incredible. Robles has benched like... 355 lbs or something like that. With a leg or without, he is stupidly strong.

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HA!

I'm sure someone with an exercise science background could explain the differences between the benefits of slower/fewer reps with better form and more/faster reps with questionable form. Personally, I start off slow then start cheating and swinging after 10-12, but I'm just trying to enter my 40s with healthy joints. I think the slow ones are less likely to injure me initially, but the fast cheating ones get me good and winded, plus they help my pride!

That's a fair judgement call, and you wouldn't be doing anything wrong, really. The fast, even kipping, pullups would help out with your fast twitch muscle fibers for explosive actions. Same as clap pushups- you can probably get a lot more force and work produced by clap pushups, but fatigue faster than if you were doing slow, controlled ones. There's no harm in doing either so long as form is maintained adequately.

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I agree that the lack of a leg can help significantly with bodyweight exercises like pullups, but 70+ reps of ANY compound exercise is incredible. Robles has benched like... 355 lbs or something like that. With a leg or without, he is stupidly strong.

 

If you attached a 30 lb weight to where he was missing a leg it wouldn't make much of a difference.  Maybe instead of 70 he would do 60.  He developed his strength to the point where he could turn anybody from the top position.  I've felt his strength when he demonstrated a tilt.  The only thing I was surprised by against McDonough was that it didn't end up a tech fall, since McDonough had never wrestled him before and wasn't prepared to know what he was facing.  You can watch film of him wrestling and know what to not do, but until you've actually felt his strength you have no idea what's coming.  I outweighed him at the time by probably 40 lbs and if it had been a live situation I wouldn't have been able to do a damn thing to stop him from tilting me.  Him not having a leg doesn't help him one bit.  He's just naturally strong.  

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If you attached a 30 lb weight to where he was missing a leg it wouldn't make much of a difference. Maybe instead of 70 he would do 60. He developed his strength to the point where he could turn anybody from the top position. I've felt his strength when he demonstrated a tilt. The only thing I was surprised by against McDonough was that it didn't end up a tech fall, since McDonough had never wrestled him before and wasn't prepared to know what he was facing. You can watch film of him wrestling and know what to not do, but until you've actually felt his strength you have no idea what's coming. I outweighed him at the time by probably 40 lbs and if it had been a live situation I wouldn't have been able to do a damn thing to stop him from tilting me. Him not having a leg doesn't help him one bit. He's just naturally strong.

I agree with you. I was always vehemently defending him when others were trying to diminish his accomplishments by saying he had so much strength because he had no leg... Last I checked, that's called a disability. Who would honestly say they would want to wrestle without a leg?

 

I'm just pointing out that with bodyweight exercises like the pullup, a reduced bodymass is beneficial. Still hard as hell, of course, I can't even do that.

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What he had in a strength advantage, he more than made up for in his lack of speed and mobility. That was the #1 reason he didn't get out from McDonough in the 3rd period, even if it was tactical stalling.

 

I always asked people who thought it was unfair to wrestle Robles: If it's so unfair to wrestle him because of that advantage (a huge one, I'll admit), then why was he only a one-time champion? Why did he had losing season records until his JR/SR years? I just think people hate on his achievements, as if he hadn't struggled all his life and worked for his success.

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I don't know where you got your information, but Robles didn't have a losing record his FR/Soph seasons. Per wrestlestat he was 25-11 as a FR, and 29-8 as a Soph (and finished 4th at NCAAs).

Sorry, you're right. I was thinking of his high school years, before he was considered to even wrestle at D1. My bad!

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Sorry, you're right. I was thinking of his high school years, before he was considered to even wrestle at D1. My bad!

 

His college coach had to be convinced to let him even join as a walk on.  He was the high school senior nationals champion at 112 lbs and had blitzed everybody for his last 2 years of high school.  Now his college coach is all smiles and sunshine about it because Anthony turned out to be successful, but he had to be talked into letting Anthony wrestle for him.  He had an academic scholarship to ASU so he would have gone to college either way.  I sometimes wish he had gone to Drexel, which was his only offer coming out of high school.  

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Tom Brand's first year at VT the pull up record was 54, held by Reed Carpenter. Guys were joking with Brands that he couldn't beat it, he was wearing a polo and khaki shorts, he took off his polo, did 55 like it was nothing, dropped down and left the weight room.  *Mind Blown*

I've heard this story before in a slightly different version - he was leaving job interview with VT, asked the interviewer what the pull-up record was, then cranked out one more than the record while wearing suit and tie.

In any event, either version sounds a little too perfect/Chuck Norris-ish. Unless someone has proof or has witnessed first hand a middle-aged TB cranking out 50+ pull-ups, I call urban myth.

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I've heard this story before in a slightly different version - he was leaving job interview with VT, asked the interviewer what the pull-up record was, then cranked out one more than the record while wearing suit and tie.

In any event, either version sounds a little too perfect/Chuck Norris-ish. Unless someone has proof or has witnessed first hand a middle-aged TB cranking out 50+ pull-ups, I call urban myth.

I wasn't there but it's no myth. I had just left the team but was still close to those guys. Hoffman told me the day it happened.

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I've seen guys do curls with insane amount of weight( a pulling motion) an be horrible at pull ups. Pull ups are more about body type/ physiologocal advantages or lack of than brute strength. Also shoulder issues of the smallest nature negate repetitions of pull ups. Personally I was "good" at pull ups, but much more impressive strength compared to most other athletes in curling, tricep movements and Bench pressing. I'd imagine in the example of Robles he also had  grip strength that was advantageous based on his compensating for loss of limb. 

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