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Fletcher

What's the proper way to discuss wrestler with a rumored mental health condition?

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Do we:

1. Ignore rumors and criticize just as we would anyone else for erratic behavior?

2. Assume rumors are true and have some sympathy for the kid for something that may be out of his control?

3. Consider it an off-limits topic and not discuss at all.

 

Not trying to dredge up more criticism of a specific wrestler; honestly just attempting to sort thru the best way to balance: (i) respecting a wrestler's privacy and being sensitive to family members who may read these boards; and (ii) honest and open discussion of what happens on the mat.

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For anybody with any class, the simple answer is,

 

You don't discuss medical issues. Especially rumors of mental health. 

Not true - medical issues are always topics of conversation about athletes. College and professional sports even have public injury reports. The situation is different if the condition is rumored - though you will still see volumes of commentary on rumored injuries for pro and college players. Public opinion seems to think discussion of rumored injuries is OK.

The mental health angle is what makes it controversial. My take is that we should ignore these rumors since they're unfounded and criticize/commend in the same way we would any other wrestler. I'm aware there could be other opinions on this, however, and maybe I'm not being sensitive enough.

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Do we:

1. Ignore rumors and criticize just as we would anyone else for erratic behavior?

2. Assume rumors are true and have some sympathy for the kid for something that may be out of his control?

3. Consider it an off-limits topic and not discuss at all.

 

Not trying to dredge up more criticism of a specific wrestler; honestly just attempting to sort thru the best way to balance: (i) respecting a wrestler's privacy and being sensitive to family members who may read these boards; and (ii) honest and open discussion of what happens on the mat

Or consider:

 

4. Accept that there may be circumstances that we don't fully know or understand, and avoid passing judgement on others.  It's one thing to speak out about a specific action, quite another thing to draw general conclusions about someone without a full understanding of the person and the situation.

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Did ADS make effort to injure opponents at any point prior to college?

 

I'm not a fan of the idea or discussion that he is mentally impaired until he has been diagnosed as such.

 

I can't speak definitively but a couple people I know independently said he's been acting like that since youth wrestling (PJWs)

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Yeah, this, "he can conduct himself respectably at all times other than when he gets beat in a wrestling match but its Ok because hes' slightly autistic" .... is this most coddling stance I have seen in a long time. 
He's a sore loser, there is 0 mention about  anything else, he can dress himself, lift, make weight, pass school, etc.... 0 issues. 
but his form of autism mainly deals with when he starts losing he throws huge tantrums and gets out of control. 
Go to a little league tournament, always a handful of "autistic" kids and adults losing their ish, I'm always the insensitive jerk saying "Parent better" but what I should be saying is don't deduct them points, hug them, because its not forward thinking to judge..

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Mental health of athletes should happen within the confines of the program that has agreed to bring that person into the wrestling/athletic family at that school.  It is in the best interest for the school, program, and administration to treat each athlete as if that were their own flesh and blood.   This day in age, I wouldn't be surprised if there is 1 in 5 student athletes with some sort of mental health issue.  It could be something brought on from family issues, death of a friend, or being homesick and falling into the wrong crowd.  I have coached at several levels and have seen the capacity of mental health go drastically down.  I think here in Nebraska for instance, I would look at the UNL Football team,  so many young men are glued to the Husker nation that they believe everything written about the team, even prior to things happening.  They buy the hype of not being good.   I know this transfer storm over the last several years has appeared to be due to homesickness (which some would say is a mental health issue).   Either way,  schools and admin need to do more to identify potential athletes with mental health issues, and help them overcome their barriers, so they can be productive in and out of the classroom in their endeavors with the school they represent. 

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I think it’s useful because it can help to understand or explain the behavior. I was a Special Olympics coach and knowing the eccentricities of the athletes was key to spotting potential problems before they arose. If there is a wrestler who is prone to violent outbursts a good coach will see the situation and can deal with it before it gets out of hand. It can also help the athlete because his coaches can address his specific needs.

 

As fans we can/should keep these things in mind when we’re at live events and try not to create these situations. It can also help us understand why things happen when we realize that an athlete can’t help certain things.

 

And lastly it can help officials. They’re on the front lines and will have a better chance of keeping things in control if they have an understanding.

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Thanks for starting this Fletcher. 

 

I don't think that taboos are good for much, but I think it's especially useless for mental health to be a taboo. There are very few people who have expertise on the subject of mental health, and as easy as that is to see in people's comments, I think airing it out is better than not discussing it.

 

Speculation and analysis are very easily confused on social media. If we think that we're engaging in anything more than conjecture on here, then we're delusional. 

 

As for social etiquette, I think the same boundaries exist in discussing any of the other remarkably different ways that our bodies are. There's no reason that a curious and polite person shouldn't be allowed to ask a question, or that a respectful and polite person shouldn't be able to provide an answer. It's equally expected that belligerence be met with intolerance. 

 

Suppose if a stranger started talking about your beautiful daughter. If he said, "Damn, I bet your daughter gets into a lot of trouble looking like that", you'd need to choke him immediately. Whereas if he mentioned that she had "natural gifts", you'd postpone choking him until he completed his next sentence. If he said that she's beautiful and doesn't seem to mean her any harm, then you'd only need to think about choking him. If he said that and accepted that she was who she was, and he only did what he could to make her life better, you might eventually stop thinking about choking him. In all of those cases, you'd rather know what the guy is thinking so that you could offer the appropriate response. 

 

Fortunately, I haven't read a comment that says one wrestler should be allowed more attempts to injure people as long as his brain is different from another's. We also haven't had anyone say that people with different brains shouldn't be allowed to compete in our sport. Those would be totally chokeworthy positions. 

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Thanks for starting this Fletcher. 

 

I don't think that taboos are good for much, but I think it's especially useless for mental health to be a taboo. There are very few people who have expertise on the subject of mental health, and as easy as that is to see in people's comments, I think airing it out is better than not discussing it.

 

Speculation and analysis are very easily confused on social media. If we think that we're engaging in anything more than conjecture on here, then we're delusional. 

 

As for social etiquette, I think the same boundaries exist in discussing any of the other remarkably different ways that our bodies are. There's no reason that a curious and polite person shouldn't be allowed to ask a question, or that a respectful and polite person shouldn't be able to provide an answer. It's equally expected that belligerence be met with intolerance. 

 

Suppose if a stranger started talking about your beautiful daughter. If he said, "Damn, I bet your daughter gets into a lot of trouble looking like that", you'd need to choke him immediately. Whereas if he mentioned that she had "natural gifts", you'd postpone choking him until he completed his next sentence. If he said that she's beautiful and doesn't seem to mean her any harm, then you'd only need to think about choking him. If he said that and accepted that she was who she was, and he only did what he could to make her life better, you might eventually stop thinking about choking him. In all of those cases, you'd rather know what the guy is thinking so that you could offer the appropriate response. 

 

Fortunately, I haven't read a comment that says one wrestler should be allowed more attempts to injure people as long as his brain is different from another's. We also haven't had anyone say that people with different brains shouldn't be allowed to compete in our sport. Those would be totally chokeworthy positions. 

What's with the choking?

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Sorry, it was late and I went on a tangent. 

The point is that you should be able to question when things are awry. And if you're not a jerk about it, you should be able to have a civil conversation about subjects that are not always easy to approach. 

I won't claim to have made my point well. 

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Perhaps the best way to answer the original question is to go to Reading PA, knock on Austin DeSanto’s front door, and ask, “What’s up with all your crazy behavior?”

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Perhaps the best way to answer the original question is to go to Reading PA, knock on Austin DeSanto’s front door, and ask, “What’s up with all your crazy behavior?”

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

But what if there's another wrestler in PA that is much more subtle about it...places his anklets perfectly parallel back on his corresponding mat line, awkwardly raises the opposite hand the ref is raising to show he won the match, and uses every chance he gets to wrench his opponents knees, elbow, and spine into a potential MMA submission position.  

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But what if there's another wrestler in PA that is much more subtle about it...places his anklets perfectly parallel back on his corresponding mat line, awkwardly raises the opposite hand the ref is raising to show he won the match, and uses every chance he gets to wrench his opponents knees, elbow, and spine into a potential MMA submission position.

Well then.... After stopping in Reading, head out to Yatesboro, talk to Jason Nolf, and compare notes.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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