Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
teach

Poverty

Recommended Posts

A good performance at a relatively large state tournament does wonders for getting recruited.  If you're from the middle of nowhere, then yeah, you have to make a trip to a larger tournament.  Are hotel rates in Fargo, ND really that bad?  

 

If you're really that good but unseen, you can always walk on and earn a scholarship/transfer to a school that will offer one.  

Fargo is the worst!   You have to go as part of your state organization and some states charge more than 1500 to go. That is definitely a fund raiser.  Kids can get better bang for their buck elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how close you are to any clubs, but I know in NJ(a little different since a small state) many clubs that will let wrestlers who truly cannot afford the club to join without paying. And you can get sponsors for Fargo and Team duals etc.

Exactly. There are three very good clubs I know of that have multiple kids training that are not paying a dime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are the types of kids that D2, NAIA, and NJCAA programs love.  Kids that turn out to be great wrestlers that no one knows about.  Those programs can offer them money and the programs will invest in the kids.

 

I strongly recommend kids from low-income situations don't go to reach programs but programs where they are much more likely to be an impact earlier on.  You can be an elite athlete from D2 or NAIA and even make world teams.  Go to a program where you're the star and they invest in you.  In D1, you have to invest in yourself a fair amount. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is one thing to have higher quality of athlete coming into college, ie Snyder, Lee, fix, because of the investments their parents made. It has had some great results. But I can't help but wonder how many misses there are on evaluating other kids potential vs these kids trained from the cradle. Jordan Burroughs may go down as one of the best ever and was a 1 time champ state champ. The sensationalization of prodigies in the last few years may be a deterrent for other guys with a higher ceiling to stick with it and believe they can ever win Ncaas, or even earn a good scholarship.

 

If a kid doesn't have the money to go to all the big tournaments, get his face on flowrestling, then why even chase the dream? Not saying it is there yet, but it may be trending that way. I don't think that's a good thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most clubs are still relatively inexpensive to attend with a $5 or $10 walk in fee or if you purchase cycles, it will be less per practice.

 

But I can see that changing soon to $20+ per practice.

 

Competing is very expensive though. Super 32, Flonationals, NHSCA and tons of big dual tournaments.

 

Camps today are almost a complete waste of money.

 

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

Edited by paboom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If a poor kid is talented and a winner in the right state, his credibility is there for all to see.  PA and NJ kids don't need to go to Super 32 or Fargo to validate what their hs record says.  Neither do the Ohio kids.  

 

But if you're from a non-top wrestling state, you probably need some wins against kids from those states, and you'll need to get to Fargo and other venues to get them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wrestling is becoming what we used to call a country club sport - e.g. golf, tennis, swimming. Not a good trend. 

 

"I don't like the sport of wrestling as you know.  It's a low sport.  And I don't like to see you being low." - Jean du Pont, Foxcatcher

Edited by Frank_Rizzo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw some stat that 29/32 first round NFL draft picks were multi sport athletes. How many NCAA wrestling champs from this year were multi sport athletes in HS? What about AA’s?

Most sports are tailored to big, athletic people like football players.  Pretty much only wrestling is tailored to 125-165 pound athletes.  So not exactly a fair comparison.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...