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Have watched this and applaud Davenport and his coaches for not losing their sh!t right there on the spot.  Typical inept ref situation--instead of conferring to get the call right, they circle the wagons and insist they saw something that obviously never happened and back each other's erroneous call.  Fortunately, the right call was eventually made.

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I guess I'm lost on this one.  Why did the match end?  There was time left in the 1st period.   Score was 6-4.  Also, what was the call - a 4 point throw or 2 exposure 2 takedown or control?  I can see the latter, but not the former. 

 

mspart

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I guess I'm lost on this one.  Why did the match end?  There was time left in the 1st period.   Score was 6-4.  Also, what was the call - a 4 point throw or 2 exposure 2 takedown or control?  I can see the latter, but not the former. 

 

mspart

Blue got the fall according to the officials.

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Oh my goodness, I'm very confused how red could lose that match. Both of blue's shoulder blades were definitely in contact with the mat for at least 1 second, so he was pinned. However, the ref didn't ask for a fall, so the judge and the chairman shouldn't have ended the match regardless. As far as I know, only the ref can ask for a fall to be confirmed. If red had  won, that  only would be very poor officiating. 

 

But that they actually raised blue's hand when red was nowhere near his back is atrocious. 

Edited by GranbyTroll

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Blue was the one pinned.  Well, he was the only one on his back.  Horrible call if that is what it was.    Someone said it was later corrected.  How did that happen?

 

mspart

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How can the blue coaches accept they won by fall? I get they are arguing they should have got the point but to accept a win in that way without trying to help correct things is not cool in my book. Maybe the refs don’t accept the correction but at least put some effort into getting it fixed.

Edited by MadMardigain

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Blue was initially given the match by fall.  As you can hear the refs saying, they both "saw" red pinned even when his shoulders never touched the mat.  Inexplicable and indefensible call.  If anyone was pinned, it was blue when red stacked him up.

 

The call was later reversed.  The red coach had to argue that the wrong man's hand was raised--that the pin was called for red (even though this was not the case, but it allowed the refs to save face and the right man to advance).

 

The blue coach did not try to argue that red was actually pinned--he wanted the match to be rewrestled.  Luckily, sanity prevailed.

Edited by Coach_J

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And I know the judge but I would argue with some of you on one thing. I believe blue would have scored the 4. Red was exposed (not touching the mat but he was inverted).

However, blue pinned himself in doing so. I'm a little unclear on this but I suspect it could have been scored 4 blue, 2 red, fall for red.

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And I know the judge but I would argue with some of you on one thing. I believe blue would have scored the 4. Red was exposed (not touching the mat but he was inverted).

However, blue pinned himself in doing so. I'm a little unclear on this but I suspect it could have been scored 4 blue, 2 red, fall for red.

It might have been scored that way but wasn't.  The refs all called a pin for blue, not against blue.  No way to excuse that call.  Lucky it was on video and someone was willing to look at.

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It might have been scored that way but wasn't.  The refs all called a pin for blue, not against blue.  No way to excuse that call.  Lucky it was on video and someone was willing to look at.

 

 

I know that. What I said was that some people were saying it wasn't 4 for blue. I think it may well have been 4 for blue. But I believe it would then also be 2 for red immediately prior to the fall in favor of red.

Also, the second "fence" throw by red was ruled a step out for blue. I agree with that but think the same could have been called on the first one that was scored 4 for red. I believe he stepped out first while lifting but before throwing.

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4 blue for feet to back.

Red held him on his back for fall.

 

Anything else is wrong.

 

The rules used to be that the offensive guy had to come to a bridge on turn, if he rolled on his shoulders he was penalized one pt.

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I can't blow it up on my phone but the judge on other side may have raised 4 fingers blue,not a fall while hand and mat chair may have misunderstood for a fall. I think the mat chair was a overwhelming presence and others cowered.

 

Another reason they should use paddles.

 

No excuse for calling wrong winner.

Edited by tbert

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I can't blow it up on my phone but the judge on other side may have raised 4 fingers blue,not a fall while hand and mat chair may have misunderstood for a fall. I think the mat chair was a overwhelming presence and others cowered.

 

Another reason they should use paddles.

 

No excuse for calling wrong winner.

It looked to me like he was calling a fall and I could hear him saying fall was confirmed during the meeting.

It is possible he did 4 in addition to the fall. 

Edited by gimpeltf

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Wow. That was just plain weird. Everything about it. Especially the way the judges handled the discussion with Davenport's coach. Now it is possible that this is a case of 3 (senile?) old refs misinterpreting the sequence. Who knows, maybe they all forgot their glasses at the hotel...

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That may be the worst call I've ever seen, and I definitely saw the Beitz-Dardanes match in Minneapolis several years ago (in fact, I was matside for that one). Even more frustrating was the guy (I believe the same official who gave a wrestler four for an eyepoke last year, causing Bryan Snyder to go absolutely ballistic) talking to Anthony Biondo like he (Biondo) was a six-year-old with an IQ roughly equivalent to that ref's shoe size.

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We're gonna see more stuff like this with such a big shortage of refs. Wrestling refs are overworked, too old but nobody to replace them, pulled up to high level stuff when they are not ready, etc etc because we simply do not have enough of them. I agree this call was clearly incorrect and the refs on the mat did not handle it well at all. Unacceptable that when three refs are 'watching' they all got the colors mixed up and refused to accept they were wrong. 

 

That all said, everybody in here bashing these guys should try putting on the stripes themselves. Maybe you will be able to help with the shortage, but you will probably realize it is 100x harder than you think and quit after getting yelled at a few times like many do. Than you might at least respect them more.

 

most refs are weirdos. I'm serious. 

 

Wrestlers are weirdos dude, not just refs. It's a fringe sport for a reason. Nice contribution.

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Have always respected the quality refs I've worked with--guys who quietly did their job, mostly unnoticeable, kept the attention on the combatants and not themselves.  Every ref blows a call, just as wrestlers miss scoring opportunities, good coaches occasionally run a poor practice, etc.  The issue here is the arrogance shown when completely in the wrong and the utter lack of respect shown to those who wanted to get it right.  At the national championship one year, our guy hit a spladle but the ref had never seen the move before and awarded no takedown, no backpoints, and, most importantly, no pin.  Later the next day he approached us and admitted he was wrong; while it didn't change anything as far as the match was concerned, I could respect the man for admitting his error and having the guts to approach us, knowing there was a strong chance we would go off on him (which we didn't; we shook hands and moved on--closure for everybody). 

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