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Schultz/Koll '95 World Team Trials Matches

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These may have been on here and I missed em, but first time I've seen these matches.  Parts of both are almost hard to watch, very brutal.  Koll about passes out in match one at 3:25, and I've never seen such a painful leglace at the end.  

 

Then at 4:50 in the second, the keylock. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Do wrestlers always sound like that at the WTT level?  If so, we need better mikes to capture it; that makes for some compelling video.  Damn.

Not always, but in the first match, Dave had Rob's knees and tendons pretty strained during that lace.

 

2nd match, Dave had a reverse standing Kimura on Rob, so.... lol

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Schultz leg lace at the end of bout one, and outside trip late in match two, are two of the most ridiculously impressive and brutal moves I've ever seen. Wow. 

 

For anyone who can recall, how did the series go with Schultz and Koll outside of these bouts?  

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He beat Koll in the US Open finals, I think in '95 as well, with a move that was so brutal I can't even believe it still. He invented it with his brother and called it the Fisherman's Hook or something like that.  It was like a gator roll at first. Dave had Koll in the front headlock and went left then right then went straight over Kolls heals while taking the headlock with him. In order to do this move without paralyzing someone, you have to do just so IMO. Its in no wasy easy or obvious. I think he pinned Koll in like a minute with it.  Dave was wrestling the best he ever had that year and would have medaled that year and beyond. His wrestling mind was hitting a new gear.  I'm getting pissed at Dupont again even typing right now.  Dave, to me, is a wrestling god. 

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I've never seen someone take the kimura to the other side like that. The normal way you hip into it goes against the shoulder joint, making it illegal. Dave hipped into the other side, like an arm throw. Interesting technique.

I trained and competed in submission grappling for about ten years, and we all knew how to use kimuras on our feet, from multiple positions, but rarely used it for fear of really injuring someone. Tough to get really good technique with something that you’re too nervous to drill.

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I trained and competed in submission grappling for about ten years, and we all knew how to use kimuras on our feet, from multiple positions, but rarely used it for fear of really injuring someone. Tough to get really good technique with something that you’re too nervous to drill.

 

I was taught to use it like an escape from bottom. Kind of like what Schultz did but from a different position. 

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I was taught to use it like an escape from bottom. Kind of like what Schultz did but from a different position.

I know the same, as well as roll through throws from a number of positions. The move that Mark S broke the Turk’s arm with is common, but meant to be kept inside the body of the guy being thrown. He took it further inside, from the torso to under the armpit, and you can see the result. Total destruction of the shoulder.

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I've never seen someone take the kimura to the other side like that. The normal way you hip into it goes against the shoulder joint, making it illegal. Dave hipped into the other side, like an arm throw. Interesting technique.

Back when the key lock was still legal Lehigh had a 190 lb wrestler named Mike Brown that would always use that key lock position from the bottom.  He could go either way with it, and he could use it from the mat or from his feet and end up with his opponent on their back.  Guys would know it was coming and try to cut Mike loose but he would just hold on to the arm.  He was a 4X AA and 4X EIWA Champ finishing 5-3-2-7.  His last year he had to fight through a pretty bad injury.

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He beat Koll in the US Open finals, I think in '95 as well, with a move that was so brutal I can't even believe it still. He invented it with his brother and called it the Fisherman's Hook or something like that.  It was like a gator roll at first. Dave had Koll in the front headlock and went left then right then went straight over Kolls heals while taking the headlock with him. In order to do this move without paralyzing someone, you have to do just so IMO. Its in no wasy easy or obvious. I think he pinned Koll in like a minute with it.  Dave was wrestling the best he ever had that year and would have medaled that year and beyond. His wrestling mind was hitting a new gear.  I'm getting pissed at Dupont again even typing right now.  Dave, to me, is a wrestling god. 

Dave did wrestle in the 1995 world championships and took 5th. Having trouble locating the brackets/pool results to see how the matches went but B Saitiev won gold, Leipold took silver, Rodriguez (Cuba) won bronze and Feyer of Switzerland was fourth. 

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Dave Schultz was just stupid strong for his physique. Koll surely had some of his father's legendary strength. But you can see the difference. There should be a serious argument between Hodge and Dave Schultz as who is just put together with the most inhuman tendon strength.

 

I know some will even argue Mark Schultz as being stronger, but i really don't think so.

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Do wrestlers always sound like that at the WTT level?  If so, we need better mikes to capture it; that makes for some compelling video.  Damn.

 

That would get in the way of the excited flo-bro color commentary.

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I know the same, as well as roll through throws from a number of positions. The move that Mark S broke the Turk’s arm with is common, but meant to be kept inside the body of the guy being thrown. He took it further inside, from the torso to under the armpit, and you can see the result. Total destruction of the shoulder.

 

If you keep it to the inside you generate a ton of pressure.  Outside like you saw in the 84 Olympics...well ouch.  Or even with what Kolat did in the state finals his senior year in PA, though that's a slightly different technique. We used to call that a pump handle.  

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Dave Schultz was just stupid strong for his physique. Koll surely had some of his father's legendary strength. But you can see the difference. There should be a serious argument between Hodge and Dave Schultz as who is just put together with the most inhuman tendon strength.

 

I know some will even argue Mark Schultz as being stronger, but i really don't think so.

 

Dave and Mark were just a different kid of strong.  Dave was "tendon strong" like you said, Mark was the epitome of explosive.  His matches against Mike Sheets are classics.

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He beat Koll in the US Open finals, I think in '95 as well, with a move that was so brutal I can't even believe it still. He invented it with his brother and called it the Fisherman's Hook or something like that.  It was like a gator roll at first. Dave had Koll in the front headlock and went left then right then went straight over Kolls heals while taking the headlock with him. In order to do this move without paralyzing someone, you have to do just so IMO. Its in no wasy easy or obvious. I think he pinned Koll in like a minute with it.  Dave was wrestling the best he ever had that year and would have medaled that year and beyond. His wrestling mind was hitting a new gear.  I'm getting pissed at Dupont again even typing right now.  Dave, to me, is a wrestling god. 

 Rob Koll was the real deal despite the beatings he took in this series, and  the only American to beat Kenny Monday after 1987 I believe so Schultz dispatching him like that three times in a row is what you call "a statement". Is there a link to that pin you describe anywhere?

 

I went down the internet rabbit hole watching some Schultz matches last night and I was just struck by how truly unique his style was.  Sure he could scramble out of almost any shot, and even find a sneaky leg attack of his own but what he really had a knack for was taking a standard move and finding almost his opponent's weakest point, often with an innovative angle of attack, and then just attack that weakest point with overwhelming force.  The way he pinned Nate Carr...... was a very tough way for Nate to go, that's for sure.

 

I've often been struck by the fact that sometimes you would see Schultz pin his way through Tbilisi and the US Open, then he'd end up taking Silver or Bronze at Worlds.  I wondered at the time what accounted for this slight inconsistency...... this may have been cleared up by a Dan Gable interview on youtube regarding Schultz, who he coached on many world teams. Gable indicated that a huge variable in Schultz results would be if his the officials would let me wrestle or call his moves illegal due to excessive brutality, obviously a very subjective thing and it's possible that some officials may have an agenda in international wrestling.  Made a lot of sense to me.

 

Anyone know who Schultz lost to in 1995 at Worlds? 

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Dave was one of the most brutal wrestlers ever, and in a way that blurred the legal/illegal line frequently, and yet somehow also one of the most, well, loved wrestlers ever. That's always been kind of interesting to me.

 

also Dave's ability to master and invent technique. along with his ability to inflict pain....he would've been an interesting guy to watch in MMA if he had chosen to and lived long enough to explore that. 

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Dave was one of the most brutal wrestlers ever, and in a way that blurred the legal/illegal line frequently, and yet somehow also one of the most, well, loved wrestlers ever. That's always been kind of interesting to me.

 

also Dave's ability to master and invent technique. along with his ability to inflict pain....he would've been an interesting guy to watch in MMA if he had chosen to and lived long enough to explore that. 

 

One of my coaches had the pleasure/displeasure of wrestling Schultz at the open or maybe Sunkist one year.  He said before the match Shultz came up to him and started showing him technique that he thought would work for him and drilled with him a little bit.  Then they got called to the mat and Dave obliterated him, and then afterwards went back to showing him what he could have done differently and what would work in the future.  

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The most wild thing i ever heard about him, second hand but from a great source, was that in college he would lose matches in the regular season to guys he thought he was gonna have to contend with at NCAAs, the idea being it would imbue them with false confidence and a bunch of other false technical assumptions. 

 

I don't know enough about his collegiate career to substantiate the idea...but i heard it. 

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