Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MedalMan

Should I quit?

Recommended Posts

I wrestled all through middle school, my dad first got me into it in 6th grade. I really enjoyed the sport and had a decent amount of success for a first year wrestler. My second year I did not enjoy the sport very much, mainly due to trying to cut way to much weight, and my third year was similar to my first. Now that I am in high school it is a different league, I have a daily schedule of waking up, going for a 5 mile run, going to school, practicing, lifting weights, studying/homework, and going to sleep. I haven't been getting any positive feeling from the sport and have just stopped enjoying wrestling. I want to quit, but I know my dad would be very upset, I would lose respect from anyone that knows me, teammates, coaches, friends. I tend to get very anxious and dreadful about the sport, but I am not sure what to do, any advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't like the sport then quit. What's the point of putting in all that work if you don't actually like it? 

 

Alternatively, consider skipping the 5 mile run and weight lifting and instead just go to practice.  I think that would free up a lot of time and make it more enjoyable.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alternatively, you could continue with your commitment to the morning run and weight lifting.  Whether you wrestle or not, these are great life habits.  My grandfather always said if you don't do it when you're young, you won't when you're old!

Nothing in this world worth a damn is easy.

That said, perhaps the changes you might consider are on the perception side of things.  Ask yourself (as in, do not answer here):

--How is my attitude and outlook?
--Might I feel differently if I was near the end of a great season?
--Am I focusing on what I'm missing out on, rather than what I'm gaining that others are missing out on?

Like many other things in life, wrestling is hard.  That bears repeating:  Like many other things in life, wrestling is hard.  That means that it will, by definition, bring you to these moments, and these questions.  Do you know what else will?

--college

--marriage

--parenthood

--career

--getting / staying in shape

--bills

While you will be making choices and commitments the rest of your life, every one you make will be predicated on what you achieved by your previous choices and commitments.  That is to say, every day we set a pattern of living that we will begin tomorrow with.  Ask yourself what kind of person you want to be.  Chances are that if you have a pulse, your choice will necessarily involve some commitments that will bring you back to these very tests you're facing now.  What kind of person do you want to be tomorrow?  Are you becoming that person today?

Okay, no judgement here, bud.  Honestly.  Wrestling is tough.  I'll put you in my prayers, because I know you're facing a very tough set of tests right now.  Much love and respect, and good luck.  Whatever you do, be brave, don't sell yourself short.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You gotta love the grind, in my eyes you have 3 choices embrace the grind, stop doing the run in the morning and lifting at night and just go to practice or quit and possibly spend the rest of your life regretting your decision. Put some real thought into your decision and good luck. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't enjoy the sport then quit. Life is too short to voluntarily do things that you don't enjoy. Bear in mind you will no longer spend as much time with your wrestling buddies, but if they are real friends they'll understand.

Edited by TobusRex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe come up with your own definition of success?  John Wooden is one of the winningist coaches in NCAA basketball history and never talked about championships or winning with his teams.  Success could be something about commitment or improvement.  Honestly, wrestling sucks and coaches get their athletes to hate their lives, but wrestling can be used as a tool to learn how to cope with stress, how to follow through on your goals despite setbacks, adversity, or plateaus.  Ask yourself how you want to remember this experience when you reflect on it for the rest of your life and act in a way that will make you proud.  If you hate the sport there is absolutely nothing wrong with moving on.  You need to wrestle for yourself and not for your dad, coaches, or anybody else.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will say this, we all hang up the wrestling shoes at some point, however I don't think you'll ever regret not hanging them up in the middle of a season. Out of the 23 guys on my college team my freshman year, over half of us expressed wanting to quit at some point over the course of the first semester. Some did. I have never regretted not quitting, though I came close several times. Most all of us have been there; wrestling can suck a lot sometimes. That said, if not even a little bit of the wrestling you are doing is for yourself, and purely for fear of what others will think if you quit, then maybe you have something to think about. There is no shame in quitting, but I have to think that it will be a lot easier socially in the long run to get through this one season and then just not go out for the sport next year than quitting in the middle of a season. Either way, good luck in your decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see no shame in quiting at the start of the season if you no longer enjoy it or other more important obligations have came up.  But keep in mind a few thing. 1. Almost all wrestlers will be done after their senior year of HS and never get to do the sport again.  You’ll have the rest of your life to do other things but only a short time left to do this sport.  2. If you are quiting with no plan of what to do next it may not be the vest idea.  If you are not filling that void with something useful and productive then it’s just quitting to be lazy and that rarely translates to anything positive that will help you in life.  3. If you’ve been training almost year round even see if you can have a week or two off to mill over your decision.  A physical and mental break is needed occasionally but use it to really evaluate the situation and talk to others about it.  If you come back it may mean missing a few meets as punishment but most coaches would be fine with a short hiatus (as long as it between you and him) rather than losing someone forever.  If those thing still don’t change your mind then you aren’t into it enough to stay.  With the season just stating there is not established final lineup where they would be counting on you.   But do it the right way and actually talk to the coach instead of just disappear.  Nothing worse than wrestlers just disappearing and the coach who has spent a lot of time working with you only getting second hand report.   Have a straight forward conversation with the coach.  The coach may not be happy with the decision, but deserves to hear it from you.  Plus having practice at those type of talks will serve you well in later situations.    

 

If you’ve made it halfway through the season, I think at that point you see it through.  You have a coach and teammates who have grown to rely on the commitment you established.  You should put forth your best effort for them at practice as a sign of the type of person you are.  Working through the struggle for others will make you a better person in the end.  In that case after the season you can talk to the coach about the your intentions  to move on.  Most coaches would be disappointed but would respec the fact you continued to work and saw the last half of the season through even though you were ready to walk away. 

Edited by MadMardigain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×