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HokieHWT

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I'm not a PSU fan although I was raised outside of Philly. I have a son and another due end of May and if they decide to wrestle and were top tier I would push them to a program run like PSU. They are good kids, good athletes, good academics, and God loving. If they didn't dominate every year people would love them. All the hate but you can't deny if your kid was good enough, you'd do all you could to get them in that room.

Go Hokies!

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We have a friend who is a single mom with a son who just started junior high last fall. She actually did an analysis and found that hockey was the sport that gives boys the best chance to earn an athletic scholarship at a D1 flagship type state or private school, given the amount of scholarship money offered vs. participation. They also looked at wrestling way back when, but the chances were unfortunately very slim (again, I'm just talking about D1). 

Her kid ended up continuing with baseball, which he loves and is very good at, where his chances are OK but not great. He lives in California but plays as a ringer of some sort on travel teams in like New Mexico where it's easier to stand out from the crowd and I guess sort of game the system. Kind of a wild process.

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I'm not sure which academic system the wrestling Ivies are on, but a big challenge for NU and Stanford are being on the quarter system. The college wrestling season overlaps two quarters which means two sets of finals on top of missing spring break, the holidays, etc. That's kind of rough for kids these days. Also the reason why it would be theoretically even harder to rebuild wrestling at the UC schools (except for Berkeley).

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2 minutes ago, wrestlingnerd said:

Pamela, I would love to see that analysis. I am dead serious. If your friend can even point me in the right direction for me to do the research myself, I would be extremely grateful. 

I will ask the next time we talk! 

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13 minutes ago, pamela said:

We have a friend who is a single mom with a son who just started junior high last fall. She actually did an analysis and found that hockey was the sport that gives boys the best chance to earn an athletic scholarship at a D1 flagship type state or private school, given the amount of scholarship money offered vs. participation. They also looked at wrestling way back when, but the chances were unfortunately very slim (again, I'm just talking about D1). 

Her kid ended up continuing with baseball, which he loves and is very good at, where his chances are OK but not great. He lives in California but plays as a ringer of some sort on travel teams in like New Mexico where it's easier to stand out from the crowd and I guess sort of game the system. Kind of a wild process.

By the time you pay off equipment and ice time for youth hockey, aren't you basically pushing even with college tuition?  There's a reason some sports are easier to get scholarships for and that's because of the general access to them.  Poor kids don't play hockey.  

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If a kid wants money for school their chances are MUCH better if they work hard for the academic route.  Many colleges have a set level of money they can get for x act or SAT.  For example, my stepson scored I believe a 27 (maybe 28) and qualified for I believe 17k to ASU.  If he went to the honors college he had a few other opportunities.  He ended up not going (girlfriend), bit that is an example.of one.  There are several schools like that.  Also he wasn't great in all subjects.  His Math was about a 30 or 31.  His reading was around a 24 I think. So you don't have to be strong everywhere. 

That is a much better return on investment.  I say that because in athletics at D1 less than 5% of students get any kind of D1 scholarship.  Even if $100.   

Most people will spend as much or more on the athletics as they make in the scholarship return.  

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10 minutes ago, scramble said:

If a kid wants money for school their chances are MUCH better if they work hard for the academic route. 

If a kid wants money for school he/she should consider schools with less competitive admissions.

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2 minutes ago, klehner said:

If a kid wants money for school he/she should consider schools with less competitive admissions.

But the process now is to have someone take your kid's SATs for them and bribe coaches to fake-recruit them onto their sports teams

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7 minutes ago, pamela said:

But the process now is to have someone take your kid's SATs for them and bribe coaches to fake-recruit them onto their sports teams

Lol.  I guess that is another option :)

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1 hour ago, pamela said:

We have a friend who is a single mom with a son who just started junior high last fall. She actually did an analysis and found that hockey was the sport that gives boys the best chance to earn an athletic scholarship at a D1 flagship type state or private school, given the amount of scholarship money offered vs. participation. They also looked at wrestling way back when, but the chances were unfortunately very slim (again, I'm just talking about D1). 

Her kid ended up continuing with baseball, which he loves and is very good at, where his chances are OK but not great. He lives in California but plays as a ringer of some sort on travel teams in like New Mexico where it's easier to stand out from the crowd and I guess sort of game the system. Kind of a wild process.

Did you account for the number of schollies that go to Canucks?

 

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I would very much commend the interviews of these wrestling athletes on Flow.

What impressive young men!

Hard-working; humble; tough-as-nails; very honest with themselves.

Well-spoken and thoughtful, in addition to being great athletes.

 

 

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