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1 hour ago, leshismore said:

He could easily go to a Jr. College.... study English for 2 years, and get into a 4 year school in a years.  Linguistically, Spanish and English are very close.

True but he would have to maintain amateur status the whole time. 

And as someone who speaks both English and Spanish I have no idea what you mean when you say they’re very close linguistically. Same alphabet and closer than English and Chinese but I wouldn’t say they’re very close. 

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43 minutes ago, MDogg said:

True but he would have to maintain amateur status the whole time. 

And as someone who speaks both English and Spanish I have no idea what you mean when you say they’re very close linguistically. Same alphabet and closer than English and Chinese but I wouldn’t say they’re very close. 

Yeah, being bilingual myself, they are very, very different.

I will say it is more difficult to teach my Hispanic friends English than my English friends Spanish. Teaching the words, though, and understanding the grammar are entirely different. That is what gets people.

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3 hours ago, nhs67 said:

Yeah, being bilingual myself, they are very, very different.

I will say it is more difficult to teach my Hispanic friends English than my English friends Spanish. Teaching the words, though, and understanding the grammar are entirely different. That is what gets people.

Sorry I was not clear.  I do understand where you are coming from. But... both English and Spanish are Indo-European languages. Spanish to English is what we call category I languages. One can gain a high level of proficiency in 30 weeks of intensive study of either language for native speakers of one of them to the other.
For category IV languages, to gain the same level of second language acquisition, you would need at least 60-80 weeks of intensive study. Most likely even more hours.
For English and Spanish speakers, such languages may include Arabic, Chinese Mandarin, Korean, Japanese, Pashto and others.
I work with these languages daily.
Again, I apologize that I was not clear. 
I agree Spanish/English do have challenges, but not near as many as category IV languages, or category III or II.
He could attain a very high level of English fluency in a year if in the right program, focus, and study.
Also, linguistically, the US is a great place to learn English because Americans give such high levels of comprehensible input.  This is not the case in some other countries, such as Japan, but that is another story.
Sorry for the lack of clarity. 
I wish him luck.  He is a true talent and would be great to see in a college program.
 

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9 hours ago, leshismore said:

Sorry I was not clear.  I do understand where you are coming from. But... both English and Spanish are Indo-European languages. Spanish to English is what we call category I languages. One can gain a high level of proficiency in 30 weeks of intensive study of either language for native speakers of one of them to the other.
For category IV languages, to gain the same level of second language acquisition, you would need at least 60-80 weeks of intensive study. Most likely even more hours.
For English and Spanish speakers, such languages may include Arabic, Chinese Mandarin, Korean, Japanese, Pashto and others.
I work with these languages daily.
Again, I apologize that I was not clear. 
I agree Spanish/English do have challenges, but not near as many as category IV languages, or category III or II.
He could attain a very high level of English fluency in a year if in the right program, focus, and study.
Also, linguistically, the US is a great place to learn English because Americans give such high levels of comprehensible input.  This is not the case in some other countries, such as Japan, but that is another story.
Sorry for the lack of clarity. 
I wish him luck.  He is a true talent and would be great to see in a college program.
 

Because Japanese culture pretty much despises anyone who isn't Japanese?

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6 hours ago, TripNSweep said:

Because Japanese culture pretty much despises anyone who isn't Japanese?

I am not sure I would state it like that. But as a Japanese specialist, I am sure you have personal and historical reasons for such opinions. 

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2 hours ago, leshismore said:

I am not sure I would state it like that. But as a Japanese specialist, I am sure you have personal and historical reasons for such opinions. 

Having known people who have lived and worked there for an extended period of time, people who have visited frequently and also from people I know who are Japanese, it is an incredibly xenophobic place.  Japanese culture does not care for foreigners very much.  It is changing but very slowly.  They tolerate foreigners to a certain degree, but it is very rare that a foreign born person will be truly accepted into their culture.  

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12 minutes ago, TripNSweep said:

Having known people who have lived and worked there for an extended period of time, people who have visited frequently and also from people I know who are Japanese, it is an incredibly xenophobic place.  Japanese culture does not care for foreigners very much.  It is changing but very slowly.  They tolerate foreigners to a certain degree, but it is very rare that a foreign born person will be truly accepted into their culture.  

As someone who has lived there as a Gaijin as a child and professional adult as an Interculturalist, I have to say that your analysis here is quite accurate from my opinion also. THIS was very well stated.  Thanks.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, leshismore said:

As someone who has lived there as a Gaijin as a child and professional adult as an Interculturalist, I have to say that your analysis here is quite accurate from my opinion also. THIS was very well stated.  Thanks.

 

 

It is changing, but very slowly. A lot of the old way of thinking and traditions won't go away very quickly. A lot of Japanese still go for things like menboku.

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You seem to understand JAPAN more than most Americans. UNC is going there.

They really should hire someone like you. Even though they are going to TOKYO a solid Japanese cultural informant would benefit them greatly.    

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2 hours ago, leshismore said:

You seem to understand JAPAN more than most Americans. UNC is going there.

They really should hire someone like you. Even though they are going to TOKYO a solid Japanese cultural informant would benefit them greatly.    

I appreciate that. I've never been to Japan though.  A lot of Americans are culturally ignorant and have very ethnocentric views about the world.  Japan is interesting because of how their culture sort of blended with what we impressed upon them after the war.  Those old traditions and beliefs didn't disappear, though a lot of Americans think that the stuff about honor and family and things like that don't exist anymore and is just confined to movies and books (if Americans even read anymore).  Sadly the first exposure a lot of Americans get to Japan is through cartoons and video games.  I think it's pretty funny how people who are into that try to adopt Japanese words and culture into their lives without realizing that they would be made fun of probably even more in Japan and definitely looked down upon as weirdos.  My friends who've visited there say that it's nothing like what most Americans think, and it's pretty conservative there. People think it's some non stop fetishists dream where Japanese women flock to Americans wearing skimpy outfits.  My friends who've lived there say that Tokyo is pretty much like any other busy city on the planet, fun sometimes but pretty mundane.  If I ever went there I wouldn't be that interested in Tokyo.  I'd rather go to someplace like Hokkaido. 

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3 hours ago, TripNSweep said:

Having known people who have lived and worked there for an extended period of time, people who have visited frequently and also from people I know who are Japanese, it is an incredibly xenophobic place.  Japanese culture does not care for foreigners very much.  It is changing but very slowly.  They tolerate foreigners to a certain degree, but it is very rare that a foreign born person will be truly accepted into their culture.  

My wife is from Japan and we try to make a trip once a year.  I haven't experienced any xenophobia and quite honestly I've had the complete opposite experience.  Nothing, but positive experiences and I've been to many parts of Japan on our travels.  

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9 hours ago, Thaddius_21 said:

My wife is from Japan and we try to make a trip once a year.  I haven't experienced any xenophobia and quite honestly I've had the complete opposite experience.  Nothing, but positive experiences and I've been to many parts of Japan on our travels.  

There's a big difference between visitng as a tourist for a few weeks and trying to live there for an extended period of time.  It isn't something you're likely to experience as a foreigner there unless you live and work there.  Japan, like some other Asian countries is pretty homogenus.  They tend to shun outsiders and people who they don't feel fit in.  Remember their history of being closed off to the outside world.  There are people of Korean descent who even today aren't afforded all the rights of Japanese citizens, simply because their grandparents or great grandparents are ethnically Korean.  I worked on an immigration case a few years ago, a half American and half Vietnamese guy was being threatened with deportation because of his criminal record. He was 100% willing to go to prison because he wanted to get himself clean and sober from drugs and alcohol. We had to present evidence that if he were returned to Vietnam, he would be treated badly, since Vietnamese people look down on people like him, since they view his mother as a traitor basically.  We managed to get him off the removal list and he was able to get clean and sober in prison.  Had he returned he wouldn't have been allowed to go to school or work in any normal job, he would have been forced into doing menial labor for almost nothing and possibly not even allowed to do that. I'm not saying Japan is exactly the same, but it is similar culturally. You aren't likely to advance your career in Japan as a foreigner since much of the power in the corporate and business world there still rests with old school Japanese who carry attitudes like menboku.  To them it would be dishonorable to let a foreigner have a powerful position in Japan.  The attitudes are changing, but it's happening very slowly.  Part of what I think will cause change is that Japan has an aging population that is very top heavy and in another 30 or 40 years a lot of what most would consider "old school" Japanese, meaning people who were alive during the wars or had parents who were and were brought up in a different Japan (pre and post war era), won't be around anymore.  

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On 7/28/2019 at 8:12 AM, Bronco said:

Seeing as this young man is currently living in Arizona - with his relatives - I would think he'd be, at the very least, more interested in wrestling in college for Arizona State.

I don't get the feeling that going away from home is much of an issue with this kid.  He seems to want what he wants.

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