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LSUs punter is 29 years old

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graduated HS in 2009 and still has a year of eligibility left. No mission, no military service. He (apparently) signed a baseball contract before ending that endeavor and walking on at LSU to play FB.

But greyshirts and deferred enrollment get posters here riled up...

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A Minor League baseball player coming back to college  is not all that rare.  Seems odd to me more because it would seem to violate amateurism rules, not so much because they are older. But I believe one can be a professional baseball player and at the same time (the same year)  play college football. Elway did that, I think.

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48 minutes ago, NJDan said:

A Minor League baseball player coming back to college  is not all that rare.  Seems odd to me more because it would seem to violate amateurism rules, not so much because they are older. But I believe one can be a professional baseball player and at the same time (the same year)  play college football. Elway did that, I think.

Amateurism rules apply to the sport you are participating. So they would not have been able to play baseball. 

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58 minutes ago, NJDan said:

A Minor League baseball player coming back to college  is not all that rare.  Seems odd to me more because it would seem to violate amateurism rules, not so much because they are older. But I believe one can be a professional baseball player and at the same time (the same year)  play college football. Elway did that, I think.

Russell Wilson did it.

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23 minutes ago, PinFallRecruit said:

Amateurism rules apply to the sport you are participating. So they would not have been able to play baseball. 

Whoa, I didn’t realize that. So like college basketball players could technically play AVP volleyball in the offseason if they wanted to and not lose NCAA eligibility? 

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Chris Weinke was 28 when he won a national title for Florida State in 1999. Guys trying their hand at pro baseball then going back to college to play football is nothing new and it’s completely different than a wrestler just sitting on years to preserve eligibility. And besides, that’s the coach’s decision and I’m sure most kids want to get out there and wrestle right away as opposed to not even enrolling in school yet and maybe having to wait two years at least to get in the lineup. At least these guys were out there trying something else before going back to a sport they haven’t played in years and not even being sure they can do it anymore.


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The "rule" on amateurism, i.e. prevention of pro/amateur intermingling and such, is such a farce.  

"Who" is this rule actually protecting?  What institution is being catered to under this rule?  I find it horrific that we lay back and simply accept the rules because of "reasons", and not really question their actual validity or benefit.

I can give arguments as to why it's preposterous.  Are there any arguments that truly and morally support this rule/concept?  

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Let's use Kyle Snyder as the example. 

While enrolled at tOSU, he could not touch the award monies or sponsorships from his achievements.  

Let's assume Matt Snyder is just as awesome but in the field of business, and starts his own business.  He makes a few hundred thousand per year, but is enrolled in business school.  

Why can Kyle not touch the results of his achievements, yet Matt can?

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Did the NCAA deem Jeremey Bloom I eligible to play football at Colorado several years back because he also was winning money as a pro-skier?  Has the rule related to his situation changed, did I miss a detail of his situation, or are some athletes getting passes for their situation that others aren’t for a similar one. 

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4 hours ago, pamela said:

Whoa, I didn’t realize that. So like college basketball players could technically play AVP volleyball in the offseason if they wanted to and not lose NCAA eligibility? 

They could. There is some more nuance to it but possible.

 

3 hours ago, gimpeltf said:

A few years back the NCAA added stricter grey-shirting rules. Only get one free year unless Military or Religious service. I believe it was after 2009 so perhaps he's grandfathered (pun semi-intentional) in.

Peace Corps (and select programs like it) qualify as well

 

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1 minute ago, MadMardigain said:

Did the NCAA deem Jeremey Bloom I eligible to play football at Colorado several years back because he also was winning money as a pro-skier?  Has the rule related to his situation changed, did I miss a detail of his situation, or are some athletes getting passes for their situation that others aren’t for a similar one. 

This is stretching my memory, but I think the issue with Bloom was making money from sponsorship deals.

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2 minutes ago, MadMardigain said:

Did the NCAA deem Jeremey Bloom I eligible to play football at Colorado several years back because he also was winning money as a pro-skier?  Has the rule related to his situation changed, did I miss a detail of his situation, or are some athletes getting passes for their situation that others aren’t for a similar one. 

I would have to look at him again, but I believe his issues wasn't the fact that he was a skier and making money from that. It was endorsements and sponsorship he would get paid for.

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Slightly different but interesting to note, Chad Hennings (a high school state wrestling champion in Iowa I believe) graduated from The Air Force Academy, chose to be a pilot, was drafted by The Dallas Cowboys, and 4 years later came back to play in The NFL as a 26 year old rookie, and was the recipient of 3 Super Bowl Rings.

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3 hours ago, jchapman said:

This is stretching my memory, but I think the issue with Bloom was making money from sponsorship deals.

 

3 hours ago, Wrestlingr2 said:

Slightly different but interesting to note, Chad Hennings (a high school state wrestling champion in Iowa I believe) graduated from The Air Force Academy, chose to be a pilot, was drafted by The Dallas Cowboys, and 4 years later came back to play in The NFL as a 26 year old rookie, and was the recipient of 3 Super Bowl Rings.

Ok.  I thought it may have been related to him having his own named line of ski stuff,  but if those items are made though a company they may have related it to sponsorship.  

Edited by MadMardigain

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8 hours ago, NJDan said:

A Minor League baseball player coming back to college  is not all that rare.  Seems odd to me more because it would seem to violate amateurism rules, not so much because they are older. But I believe one can be a professional baseball player and at the same time (the same year)  play college football. Elway did that, I think.

George Steinbrenner paid him $100K to play A ball for a summer, in an effort to get him to switch sports.

Best paying summer job I ever heard of.

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4 hours ago, treep2000 said:

Let's use Kyle Snyder as the example. 

While enrolled at tOSU, he could not touch the award monies or sponsorships from his achievements.  

Let's assume Matt Snyder is just as awesome but in the field of business, and starts his own business.  He makes a few hundred thousand per year, but is enrolled in business school.  

Why can Kyle not touch the results of his achievements, yet Matt can?

Because Matt doesn't have a scholarship saying he can't be in business school if he takes hundreds of thousands of dollars.  

I agree with you that it's an arbitrary rule.  But it's also arbitrary to compare apples and oranges.

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