Jump to content
Marcus Cisero

How Important Is It To Have Mom and Dad in the Audience?

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Marcus Cisero said:

All kidding aside, that had to be one of the most entertaining heavyweight matches I’ve seen in a long time.  The fact that it was a HIGH SCHOOL match blows me away. The body throws, duck-unders, shrugs and how about the bigger guy locking up the cradle. Exciting right down to the end and neither seem too winded and probably could have gone further.

As for the comment from Mom in stands, “put them groceries on him, Ricky” I would had loved to interview her to see what that she meant by that!

 

There are a few other things I love about this. This is the third place match at state, so the stakes were pretty high, but these guys are having a great time. Rickie is smiling, Robert is pumping up the crowd AFTER he gets taken down by Rickie, and then they give each other a big hug at the end. The crowd was going crazy during this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Obelix said:

 

My parents went to all of my events, all the way through college. They would rarely sit together, as Dad was tightly wound and he wanted some space from our fans. I have young sons myself, and I'll follow my parents' lead, every step of the way. 

One of my wrestling highlights came last spring in Vegas, when I re-introduced myself to Steve Sanderson and we chatted for awhile. (Cody--who still goes out of his way to say hi to me--worked me over a bunch growing up, and the Sanderson parents were absolutely wonderful to me and my family in the early 90s.) Steve remembered who I was, and just that mere fact fills me with pride. 

After coaching for 20 years with my wife sitting in the stands and me down on the mat with the boys this past season has been.........tightly wound............my wife tells me every match......see what I have been putting up with for 20 years!!!!

I have to admit that being in the middle of the day making sure my team was ready is a completely different experience than sitting up in the stands.... just ..............watching tightly wound!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Wrestleknownothing said:

A big thank you to Marcus Cisero for starting this thread. A bright shining light of positivity and a forum to tell our stories. Makes everyone more human instead of some nameless, faceless person on the internet. Raises the level of discourse. Thanks again for doing this.

And it certainly could use some raising. As a 72-year-old former wrestler, coach, parent and fan--and just an occasional visitor here--I've suggested that before but was hooted down. Oh well...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Panther78 said:

After coaching for 20 years with my wife sitting in the stands and me down on the mat with the boys this past season has been.........tightly wound............my wife tells me every match......see what I have been putting up with for 20 years!!!!

I have to admit that being in the middle of the day making sure my team was ready is a completely different experience than sitting up in the stands.... just ..............watching tightly wound!!!!

That's funny, as I just finished my 20th year of coaching high school, too. My kids are 4 and 6, so I have another 15 years or so in me!

My dad is gone, but my mom still goes to most of our team's matches. I coach with my brother, too, which makes it a real family affair. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Obelix said:

That's funny, as I just finished my 20th year of coaching high school, too. My kids are 4 and 6, so I have another 15 years or so in me!

My dad is gone, but my mom still goes to most of our team's matches. I coach with my brother, too, which makes it a real family affair. 

I was in a unique situation....maybe not so much but unique for me......I played basketball and football.....the little guy on the floor/field.....mostly on the bench!

I got involved as a dad when my oldest expressed interest in wrestling and our school district was scrambling for a coach. I got tons of help(technique) over the next 20 years because I was clueless. I attended clinics, went to seminars, was on the cutting edge learning track wrestling as it finally showed up in AZ......

I did not enjoy coaching my boys in the regard that........they had to toe the line.....always......every time....with much more severe consequences that the rest of the team, right or wrong that was not easy or fun! I did enjoy learning the sport and seeing my boys progress and learn. Sunday afternoons were spent reviewing film!

Cherish the time with your young ones, it is precious and priceless!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fightingsioux said:

And it certainly could use some raising. As a 72-year-old former wrestler, coach, parent and fan--and just an occasional visitor here--I've suggested that before but was hooted down. Oh well...

fightingsioux, 72 years is still young and I bet a lot of us would love to hear a few words on how wrestling, coaching, parenting and obvious avid fan contributed to your life today. Please consider sir!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Panther78 said:

After coaching for 20 years with my wife sitting in the stands and me down on the mat with the boys this past season has been.........tightly wound............my wife tells me every match......see what I have been putting up with for 20 years!!!!

I have to admit that being in the middle of the day making sure my team was ready is a completely different experience than sitting up in the stands.... just ..............watching tightly wound!!!!

its in your DNA!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Wrestleknownothing said:

A big thank you to Marcus Cisero for starting this thread. A bright shining light of positivity and a forum to tell our stories. Makes everyone more human instead of some nameless, faceless person on the internet. Raises the level of discourse. Thanks again for doing this.

Thanks  wrestleknownothing but the real thanks goes to those willing to share part of what contributed to their foundation today. Those who did so in this thread deserve all the accolades, not me. Knowing this forum attracts thousands motivates me to do it again in the future, not for me – but to highlight the additional individuals who have inspirational stories of their own to share that in turn inspires the rest of us. This sport is special, very special – make no mistake about it. I’m merely a catalyst to get the ball rolling with the hope that others with more street cred here than I do it too.

Edited by Marcus Cisero

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't call me a wrestler, but my mom never missed.  With respect to my own kids, I had to work with my wife on keeping it civil.  One time in Fargo, I was uncivil and compared a kid who repeatedly faked injuries to a soccer player.

J'Den Cox' mom is loud and proud. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Plasmodium said:

I wouldn't call me a wrestler, but my mom never missed.  With respect to my own kids, I had to work with my wife on keeping it civil.  One time in Fargo, I was uncivil and compared a kid who repeatedly faked injuries to a soccer player.

J'Den Cox' mom is loud and proud. 

compared a kid who repeatedly faked injuries to a soccer player

 

But wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy so true :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Marcus Cisero said:

fightingsioux, 72 years is still young and I bet a lot of us would love to hear a few words on how wrestling, coaching, parenting and obvious avid fan contributed to your life today. Please consider sir!

My grandfather was a wrestler in the Ukraine, his father and his father, on and on. After he emigrated here, he made sure that my father was a wrestler and I pretty much had no choice as to my terrible fate! :-)
 
Started when I was 4 or 5, actively wrestled till I was in my early 60s. I now have a neurological illness that affects my balance and walking but I still hobble to high school and college meets.
 
My early coaches were very, very tough, very unforgiving: this includes my grandfather and father and my youth coaches in New York in the 1950s. Even my high school and college coaches in the 1960s. It was a different era, almost incomprehensible to most athletes and coaches today. I was a rebellious, anti-authoritarian, mouthy little jerk. That kind of behavior in the room earned me a hard slap in the face. This did not result--as it would today--in a lawsuit or a firing. It was the norm, everyone experienced it.
 
I remember one time, it was somewhere around 1962, I was a HS freshman, just getting to know the coach who had been a well-known wrestler himself. I must have made some stupid, smart-ass remark and he just hauled off and slapped me so hard my ears rang. My father was right there. He said to the coach, "Next time hit him harder."  :-)  Just imagine that scenario today!
 
By the time I became a parent and a coach, thankfully things were changing. It's not a sport for the weak of body, mind or spirit: it never was, it never will be, it cannot be. It's a tough activity and it makes one tough. But there's a fine line between making kids tough and brutalizing them.
 
I was lucky enough to work as a graduate assistant and as an assistant high school coach under good, experienced head coaches. I learned, adapted, as all coaches who want to succeed I went with what works. Looking back, it was a lot of fun. For me, at the end of the school day, taking off my teacher outfit and putting on my wrestling stuff was like an enjoyable and thrilling trip in a time machine. I actively wrestled almost every practice, I didn't really know any other way, I wanted to wrestle! I loved it!
 
One sees many younger coaches who were wrestlers show off. They feel a need to beat people in the room, it's some kind of authority/ego thing. This is bad, bad, bad. We're there to make them greater than us. I used to tell the kids that if they worked hard and gave it everything they had and trusted me I was going to show them how to beat me. And if they could beat me I couldn't guarantee that they'd be state champs, but I could guarantee that they'd be there at the tournament!
 
The parent thing...ah, that's a tough one. I was too hard on my oldest son, I see that now. I think that young athletes need both a father and a coach, and if you have to choose between the two then be a father.
 
Wrestling shaped me, gave me an identity, influenced how I acted and what I did, how I saw myself and my place in the world. I always felt, and still do, that there's an unspoken, unwritten wrestler's code, it's the warrior's code: tough but gentle, strong but compassionate, all-out on the mat but easy-going and kind in real life. Once it gets in you it never leaves.
Edited by fightingsioux
change

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, fightingsioux said:
My grandfather was a wrestler in the Ukraine, his father and his father, on and on. After he emigrated here, he made sure that my father was a wrestler and I pretty much had no choice as to my terrible fate! :-)
 
Started when I was 4 or 5, actively wrestled till I was in my early 60s. I now have a neurological illness that affects my balance and walking but I still hobble to high school and college meets.
 
My early coaches were very, very tough, very unforgiving: this includes my grandfather and father and my youth coaches in New York in the 1950s. Even my high school and college coaches in the 1960s. It was a different era, almost incomprehensible to most athletes and coaches today. I was a rebellious, anti-authoritarian, mouthy little jerk. That kind of behavior in the room earned me a hard slap in the face. This did not result--as it would today--in a lawsuit or a firing. It was the norm, everyone experienced it.
 
I remember one time, it was somewhere around 1962, I was a HS freshman, just getting to know the coach who had been a well-known wrestler himself. I must have made some stupid, smart-ass remark and he just hauled off and slapped me so hard my ears rang. My father was right there. He said to the coach, "Next time hit him harder."  :-)  Just imagine that scenario today!
 
By the time I became a parent and a coach, thankfully things were changing. It's not a sport for the weak of body, mind or spirit: it never was, it never will be, it cannot be. It's a tough activity and it makes one tough. But there's a fine line between making kids tough and brutalizing them.
 
I was lucky enough to work as a graduate assistant and as an assistant high school coach under good, experienced head coaches. I learned, adapted, as all coaches who want to succeed I went with what works. Looking back, it was a lot of fun. For me, at the end of the school day, taking off my teacher outfit and putting on my wrestling stuff was like an enjoyable and thrilling trip in a time machine. I actively wrestled almost every practice, I didn't really know any other way, I wanted to wrestle! I loved it!
 
One sees many younger coaches who were wrestlers show off. They feel a need to beat people in the room, it's some kind of authority/ego thing. This is bad, bad, bad. We're there to make them greater than us. I used to tell the kids that if they worked hard and gave it everything they had and trusted me I was going to show them how to beat me. And if they could beat me I couldn't guarantee that they'd be state champs, but I could guarantee that they'd be there at the tournament!
 
The parent thing...ah, that's a tough one. I was too hard on my oldest son, I see that now. I think that young athletes need both a father and a coach, and if you have to choose between the two then be a father.
 
Wrestling shaped me, gave me an identity, influenced how I acted and what I did, how I saw myself and my place in the world. I always felt, and still do, that there's an unspoken, unwritten wrestler's code, it's the warrior's code: tough but gentle, strong but compassionate, all-out on the mat but easy-going and kind in real life. Once it gets in you it never leaves.

I'm sitting here sipping my coffee......... not quite sure how to respond........in awe of what I just read.   

That has to be one of the nicest things I've read about anyone in a very long time.  What an amazing story!

Thank you so much fightingsioux for sharing your "wrestler's code" with us. I truly hope everyone here gets to read it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Wrestling Parent

Parents in wrestling are courageous -- it's true;
They feel all the pain that their boy must go through. At home, when he diets, they wish it could stop, Yet know he must do it to stay on top.

Excuses for losing they will never endure,
Don't blame the ref, son, because of the score.
The coach, he will show you the best way to move,
Keep working in practice if you want to improve.

At dual meets you'll see them whispering a prayer,
As their boy must compete with no one else there.
Whatever the outcome, Mom cheers with deep pride,
While Dad, you will notice, stands right by his side.

They'll drive to a tournament; many miles away,
To witness a son who's prepared for this day.
Their boy, he has trained, with all of his might,
Having hopes of becoming a champion tonight.

But should he fall short, in his corner you'll find, A Mother and a Father, supportive and kind.
They teach that through wrestling he'll learn about life, Yes, living is filled with both triumph and strife.

Now if you are searching for people who care,
Just look by a mat, they'll always be there.
Such love for the sport is truly inherent,
That's why we salute, The Wrestling Parent!

author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Plasmodium said:

I wouldn't call me a wrestler, but my mom never missed.  With respect to my own kids, I had to work with my wife on keeping it civil.  One time in Fargo, I was uncivil and compared a kid who repeatedly faked injuries to a soccer player.

J'Den Cox' mom is loud and proud. 

thank you for sharing your family with us!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jross said:

The Wrestling Parent

Parents in wrestling are courageous -- it's true;
They feel all the pain that their boy must go through. At home, when he diets, they wish it could stop, Yet know he must do it to stay on top.

Excuses for losing they will never endure,
Don't blame the ref, son, because of the score.
The coach, he will show you the best way to move,
Keep working in practice if you want to improve.

At dual meets you'll see them whispering a prayer,
As their boy must compete with no one else there.
Whatever the outcome, Mom cheers with deep pride,
While Dad, you will notice, stands right by his side.

They'll drive to a tournament; many miles away,
To witness a son who's prepared for this day.
Their boy, he has trained, with all of his might,
Having hopes of becoming a champion tonight.

But should he fall short, in his corner you'll find, A Mother and a Father, supportive and kind.
They teach that through wrestling he'll learn about life, Yes, living is filled with both triumph and strife.

Now if you are searching for people who care,
Just look by a mat, they'll always be there.
Such love for the sport is truly inherent,
That's why we salute, The Wrestling Parent!

author unknown

jross - I'm passing the reigns on to you to start the next thread on the importance of having Mom and Dad in the audience, only this time and I'd like to suggest you preface it with this well written poem.  That was phenomenal!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first made varsity in high school, I never wanted my parents to come because I was afraid that I would lose, which happened a lot.  When I got a victory, I really wished they had been there after the fact.   My mother, who did not understand wrestling at all, would always feel bad for me,  as it looked like I was getting tortured.  Once I started winning a lot, she would feel bad for my opponents and not like seeing them in pain.

Both parents would come to almost all my home meets in college and though it did not mean that much to me at the time, it does now.  They never understood wrestling and really did not like watching it, but wanted to support me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Jim L said:

When I first made varsity in high school, I never wanted my parents to come because I was afraid that I would lose, which happened a lot.  When I got a victory, I really wished they had been there after the fact.   My mother, who did not understand wrestling at all, would always feel bad for me,  as it looked like I was getting tortured.  Once I started winning a lot, she would feel bad for my opponents and not like seeing them in pain.

Both parents would come to almost all my home meets in college and though it did not mean that much to me at the time, it does now.  They never understood wrestling and really did not like watching it, but wanted to support me.

Jim L - it sounds like the love your parents have for you won out in the end, whether they enjoyed wrestling or not. They were there for YOU. It's interesting how as we get older in life and reflect back the way you just did, we realize just how much how our parents meant to us all along. I bet they think the world of their fine son. Thanks Jim!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...