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executionery4145

College eligibility?

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Very complex.  For D1, a clock starts when you enroll in college fulltime or one year out of HS whichever comes first. That makes a practical limit for most. I think NAIA, D2 and D3 don't have a clock but rather allow 10 semesters of participation so there is no practical limit.  The clock stops with some chuch service(LDS missions are one), military service and other things, so even D1 has no hard limit.  I recall a late 20s rookie on the Broncos who  served in the military and then played D1 football somewhere.

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21 minutes ago, Plasmodium said:

Very complex.  For D1, a clock starts when you enroll in college fulltime or one year out of HS whichever comes first. That makes a practical limit for most. I think NAIA, D2 and D3 don't have a clock but rather allow 10 semesters of participation so there is no practical limit.  The clock stops with some chuch service(LDS missions are one), military service and other things, so even D1 has no hard limit.  I recall a late 20s rookie on the Broncos who  served in the military and then played D1 football somewhere.

Right.  You've also got the influx of 30+ year old Australian kickers and punters in D1 football.  

I personally plan to return to competition as a grad student after retiring and win a D3 title.  

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DI: 

Up to 6 years to finish 4 without medical/hardship waiver.  1 year post graduating HS (Think blair post grads), then one RS year, then 4 years.  CONSECUTIVE TIME STARTING ONCE YOU GRADUATE HS.  If you enlist in the military out of HS, you can do a 20 year career, retire, then go to any division and have 5 years to play 4.  OR, you can go to college for two years, join the military for any amount of time, then come back and start right where you left off.

Example is Randy Couture.  Graduated HS in 1981 then went to Washington State University (briefly).  Spent 6 years in the Army from 1982-1988.  He caught the eye of Coach Bruce Burnett of OK State and wrestled at OSU from 1989-1992.  Couture was 25 years old as a college freshman. 

Another example is American University's first all American, Daniel Waters, was an ex navy seal.  I believe Waters wrestled a year or two somewhere then enlisted.  Coincidentally AUs first national champ, Josh Glenn (teammate of Waters) is a current Active Duty Navy Seal Officer (MAJ). 

DII/DIII: 

DII and DIII doesn't go by semesters.  You have unlimited time to do 4 years.  You simply need to be a full time student.  For instance, If you wrestled 2 years in any division then quit the team (not rostered) and finished your degree.  Even if you have a 2 year break in school, then go to grad school, you could wrestle an additional 2 years while getting your masters degree at a DIII school.  

Example is Max Schneider from SF State.  He started his career in Cal Poly for two years.  Competed in the Judo Sr Level for 4 years nationally and internationally.  Then went to SF State, where he wrestled this year.  Not exactly sure of his eligibility because wrestle stat has him as a SR, but SF State has him as a JR. 

NAIA/JC: 

These are where semesters come into play.  Unlimited time to finish 10 semesters (8 competition). 

There was a story about an Oregon JC who had a dude in his 30s wrestling and made it to nationals.  The guy was a recovering addict.  Got hooked on methamphetamines while working the crab/fishing industry in the pacific northwest.  I believe he had one or two semesters left. 

 

Cornell:  

They are allowed to do whatever they want.  

 

Internships, and academic exchange programs also are not counted for time.  

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11 minutes ago, steamboat_charlie v2 said:

Right.  You've also got the influx of 30+ year old Australian kickers and punters in D1 football.  

I personally plan to return to competition as a grad student after retiring and win a D3 title.  

If you hand carried a video and a resume to a coach stating you were a Veterans class "Z" national freestyle champion and acted like that was a SERIOUS accomplishment...I wonder if the coach would laugh.  I would.  

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NOTE:  if Mason Manville is a member of the US Army, he can wrestle in WCAP indefinitely until he wants to go to the NCAA.  I am not sure if he is or isn't in the military.  Even if he is reserves, he would get "activated" during time on WCAP.  Good thing that Penn State has a deal with WCAP to use their facility to train.  Manville doesn't need to move to Colorado springs.    

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2 minutes ago, Cptafw164 said:

If you hand carried a video and a resume to a coach stating you were a Veterans class "Z" national freestyle champion and acted like that was a SERIOUS accomplishment...I wonder if the coach would laugh.  I would.  

Resume?  I'll just tell him "line the boys up, let's run shark bait."

Trick will be getting past the 125 pounder...

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4 hours ago, steamboat_charlie v2 said:

Right.  You've also got the influx of 30+ year old Australian kickers and punters in D1 football.  

I personally plan to return to competition as a grad student after retiring and win a D3 title.  

I'll keep an eye out for you.  Best of luck!

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18 hours ago, Plasmodium said:

Very complex.  For D1, a clock starts when you enroll in college fulltime or one year out of HS whichever comes first. That makes a practical limit for most. I think NAIA, D2 and D3 don't have a clock but rather allow 10 semesters of participation so there is no practical limit.  The clock stops with some chuch service(LDS missions are one), military service and other things, so even D1 has no hard limit.  I recall a late 20s rookie on the Broncos who  served in the military and then played D1 football somewhere.

I get the military and religious exceptions but how are all these much older Aussie punters eligible to play D1 football?

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On 3/4/2020 at 3:18 PM, executionery4145 said:

Does college sports have an age limit ? Has anyone ever came back to compete in college in their 30s?

Yes.  Bogdan Clufulescu was a 1996 Olympic representative for Romania that became a 32 year old USA college freshman.  He was a 2xNJCAA champion that claimed the NJCAA was tougher than D2 and D3 NCAA wrestling.  He lived in Chanute, KS and wrestled for Neosho County Community College.

I found his story interesting at https://www.chanute.com/archives/article_54f48378-e38f-5b04-a740-e5ebd799520b.html

Some of the interesting comments are included below.

Quote

“Here, it’s always ‘go, go, go’ all the time,” he said, “and I’d say, ‘Why do I have to go when I am already 10 points ahead? I only need one point to win.’ In about one hour, I’d have another match.”  Ciufulescu would have rather taken it easy on his opponent after establishing his dominance early in the match, and defended his points. “It’s just a little different,” Ciufulescu said. “In wrestling, you’ve got to reserve your energy, and when you’re 32 years old, and you’re wrestling five or six matches during a day, you’ve got to be ready. So, I used my experience.”

Quote

According to Ciufulescu, junior college wrestling is right under Division One colleges, in terms of the difficulty in competing.  “It’s probably better than Division Two,” he said. “The competition, they’re all really, really tough kids.”

Quote

“For me, I wrestled four world championships, one Olympic Games, and maybe five European championships,” Ciufulescu said, “so I had so much experience compared to those kids. In wrestling, techniques and tactics are so important. You can have somebody very, very strong, but if he’s not good at technique, you can easily win.”  He wrestled at 133 and 141 for the Panthers. His matches with the Panthers pitted experience against youth. He said that overmatching his 18- and 19-year-old opponents “wasn’t too hard.”

Quote

“For me and my brother, wrestling was an opportunity to succeed in life,” he said, “to get out of that strict regime. The Communists were very controlling, and you couldn’t say what you think. And to be able to be free, you either had to have a lot of money, or you had to do something so you’d be able to travel and go around the world. So, for me and my brother, being in an orphanage, it was kind of difficult. We understood that we had to be, If not the best, near the top in some discipline. We would either go to school and be the smartest kids or we’d have to be good athletes.”  Once the brothers learned that they were able to get favors from the government and make a little money, because of their athletic talents, they started to love wrestling.

 

Edited by jross

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2 hours ago, MDogg said:

I get the military and religious exceptions but how are all these much older Aussie punters eligible to play D1 football?

I believe international athletes aren’t subject to the 1 year post-hs clock because it’s a different process to get registered and cleared for eligibility with the NCAA. 

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3 hours ago, pamela said:

I believe international athletes aren’t subject to the 1 year post-hs clock because it’s a different process to get registered and cleared for eligibility with the NCAA. 

Thanks. I get not holding them to standards that are AS strict but it looks like there are no age-related standards at all for these guys. Last season there were 3 Aussie kickers playing division 1 college football. One of them was previously a construction worker. Makes no sense to me why the NCAA would allow him to play D1 sports but not a 24 year old American kid who also went into construction out of high school. I get giving foreign kids a little more leeway because of the extra time it might take them to get through the red tape but this seems excessive.

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2 minutes ago, MDogg said:

Thanks. I get not holding them to standards that are AS strict but it looks like there are no age-related standards at all for these guys. Last season there were 3 Aussie kickers playing division 1 college football. One of them was previously a construction worker. Makes no sense to me why the NCAA would allow him to play D1 sports but not a 24 year old American kid who also went into construction out of high school. I get giving foreign kids a little more leeway because of the extra time it might take them to get through the red tape but this seems excessive.

I agree, though I’m guessing that the loophole isn’t closed because it isn’t really abused and is a net benefit for foreign student athletes rather than a liability.

Going the NCAA route means prolonging one’s amateurism, and that might be too high of an opportunity cost for older athletes. Age also works against revenue sports athletes. Meanwhile non-revenue sports athletes can probably get a better deal going to school at home rather than a partial scholly or whatever here.

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18 minutes ago, Cptafw164 said:

That is an Ivy rule.  Instead they call it a gap year where they wrestle for a RTC while not enrolled in school.  

Yep....which is why I said it given the context of the whole thread....

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