Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TobusRex

Economic impact of COVID 19 may kill wrestling programs

Recommended Posts

11 hours ago, calot said:

Wonder if the MAC eliminates the divisions in wrestling?Cleveland St is supposed to move to the East to replace ODU.I could see the MAC saying just get 6-7 conference duals in

Would expect conferences to be more likely to go to divisions, rather than less, as a cost-saving measure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, SetonHallPirate said:

Would expect conferences to be more likely to go to divisions, rather than less, as a cost-saving measure.

Well the MAC put Cleveland St in the East over Buffalo.If you take mileage from both universities to every place in the west Buffalo will travel 1,146 more miles then Cleveland St wouldve had to.So now youve a Mac division and a EWL division.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, calot said:

Well the MAC put Cleveland St in the East over Buffalo.If you take mileage from both universities to every place in the west Buffalo will travel 1,146 more miles then Cleveland St wouldve had to.So now youve a Mac division and a EWL division.

Yeah, that makes no sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, SetonHallPirate said:

Yeah, that makes no sense to me.

Mac east Cleveland St 1659 miles and Buffalo 1521 miles for difference of 138 miles.

Mac west Cleveland St 2183 miles and Buffalo 3329  for a difference of 1146

To me this should be changed immediately.Was a AD vote.

Edited by calot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, lu_alum said:

Not all California schools at this time.  This just covers the "Cal State" schools.  Does not apply to the "UC" schools.  

As you know, none of the UCs sponsor NCAA wrestling.

The CA State schools (CSUB, Poly, Fresno, SF) better find mandatory physical attendance labs for their wrestlers so they can be on campus and in the room(s) beginning in August, otherwise the season(s) could be in serious jeopardy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, PSUSMC said:

As you know, none of the UCs sponsor NCAA wrestling.

The CA State schools (CSUB, Poly, Fresno, SF) better find mandatory physical attendance labs for their wrestlers so they can be on campus and in the room(s) beginning in August, otherwise the season(s) could be in serious jeopardy.

They won’t have sports during this period. The few classes they will have will require low density settings.  I expect most other universities to follow suit, so if there is a wrestling season, it will definitely be truncated. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, PSUSMC said:

As you know, none of the UCs sponsor NCAA wrestling.

The CA State schools (CSUB, Poly, Fresno, SF) better find mandatory physical attendance labs for their wrestlers so they can be on campus and in the room(s) beginning in August, otherwise the season(s) could be in serious jeopardy.

Won't happen. Wrestling is a lot higher priority to the guys in the forum than the guys calling the shots in California.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, ionel said:

Do we have a vaccine for HIV?

Did we have a vaccine for the 2017/18 flu?

Wrestling has a thing called blood time in large part to prevent the spread of blood borne pathogens like HIV.  It's a very good thing that HIV isn't as contagious as coronavirus.  And a vaccine is developed for the flu every year that saves many lives...Don't you know that?

 

5 hours ago, AKHUNTER said:

there is NO guarantee there will EVER be a vaccine.

Given that 99% of everyone infected recovers and acquires immunity, it is a near certainty that one of the vaccine efforts underway will succeed.  It's a question of which and when, not if.  In a worst case scenario, even if some of the fancier mRNA based or adenovirus-based strategies don't work, an attenuated virus will do the trick. 

Edited by Billyhoyle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Billyhoyle said:

.  And a vaccine is developed for the flu every year that saves many lives...Don't you know that?

 

Sure except it didn't work for the 17/18 flu strain hence why so many died.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Billyhoyle said:

Wrestling has a thing called blood time in large part to prevent the spread of blood borne pathogens like HIV.  It's a very good thing that HIV isn't as contagious as coronavirus.  And a vaccine is developed for the flu every year that saves many lives...Don't you know that?

 

Given that 99% of everyone infected recovers and acquires immunity, it is a near certainty that one of the vaccine efforts underway will succeed.  It's a question of which and when, not if.  In a worst case scenario, even if some of the fancier mRNA based or adenovirus-based strategies don't work, an attenuated virus will do the trick. 

Billy ..... what I have read is that they are not certain if being infected then gives one immunity. Have you seen fact based information that says otherwise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, AKHUNTER said:

Billy ..... what I have read is that they are not certain if being infected then gives one immunity. Have you seen fact based information that says otherwise?

Yes, for a couple of reasons.  The reason some are saying they are not certain is just out of an abundance of caution, since there will probably be a couple of anomalous exceptions (e.g. an immunocompromised individual who has an especially poor ability to develop immunity due to genetic or environmental factors). The vast majority of people will almost certainly be immune from reinfection-or if they are exposed to the virus again at a high enough level to evoke some type of illness, they will have enough of a protection against it to have a very mild disease (kind of like a booster shot in a vaccine). 

The best evidence is the following:

1.  Experiments carried out in monkeys demonstrate that protective immunity is developed.

2.  If people could get reinfected, at this point you would have seen hundreds of cases already in a place like NYC where 20% have been infected and many have recovered. The only reports of reinfection are scattered, possibly anomalous or more than likely due to a false negative/positive in a prior test.

3. The virus is successfully cleared by the immune system in >99% of individuals, generally due to an adaptive response.  When this happens, the body develops memory cells that are able to recognize a subsequent infection and respond more efficiently.  Protective antibodies have been detected in people who have previously been infected.  This virus does not have the features of those that are highly mutagenic (and thereby evade protective immunity) or could potentially co-opt protective antibodies (e.g. infect cells that recognize antibodies).  Scientists know a lot about viruses at this point, and while covid-19 is "novel" in that our immune systems have not previously been exposed to it, the identity of the genes that makeup the virus are not completely novel and are highly similar to other coronaviruses (especially SARS). 

The strange statement that the WHO put out a week or two ago about the potential for reinfection was very misleading regarding what is currently believed to be the consensus on this...Kind of like how their original statement on masks not being helpful was also misleading.  

Edited by Billyhoyle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Billyhoyle said:

Yes, for a couple of reasons.  The reason some are saying they are not certain is just out of an abundance of caution, since there will probably be a couple of anomalous exceptions (e.g. an immunocompromised individual who has an especially poor ability to develop immunity due to genetic or environmental factors). The vast majority of people will almost certainly be immune from reinfection-or if they are exposed to the virus again at a high enough level to evoke some type of illness, they will have enough of a protection against it to have a very mild disease (kind of like a booster shot in a vaccine). 

The best evidence is the following:

1.  Experiments carried out in monkeys demonstrate that protective immunity is developed.

2.  If people could get reinfected, at this point you would have seen hundreds of cases already in a place like NYC where 20% have been infected and many have recovered. The only reports of reinfection are scattered, possibly anomalous or more than likely due to a false negative/positive in a prior test.

3. The virus is successfully cleared by the immune system in >99% of individuals, generally due to an adaptive response.  When this happens, the body develops memory cells that are able to recognize a subsequent infection and respond more efficiently.  Protective antibodies have been detected in people who have previously been infected.  This virus does not have the features of those that are highly mutagenic (and thereby evade protective immunity) or could potentially co-opt protective antibodies (e.g. infect cells that recognize antibodies).  Scientists know a lot about viruses at this point, and while covid-19 is "novel" in that our immune systems have not previously been exposed to it, the identity of the genes that makeup the virus are not completely novel and are highly similar to other coronaviruses (especially SARS). 

The strange statement that the WHO put out a week or two ago about the potential for reinfection was very misleading regarding what is currently believed to be the consensus on this...Kind of like how their original statement on masks not being helpful was also misleading.  

From what I've read,there is no question that people who have had Covid develop some type of immunity.

The question is,how long does it last.

Apparently,depending on the strain,immunity can be very short lived.

Same thing,the articles I've read said they've never been successful in developing a covid vaccine.

One reason they said is that it mutates quickly and frequently.

As someone pointed out,they've been trying to develop an AIDS  vaccine since

the virus first appeared.

Still haven't been able to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With classes online in the spring and perhaps the fall for most, universities will lose 10s of millions of dollars in lost revenue. Division I football might be next with the loss of 10s of millions more in revenue for power 5 conferences. Since these fund athletics, often independently from the university budget, it may have a disastrous impact on non-revenue Div-1 sports like wrestling. 

Even some of the wealthiest schools are already announcing draconian cuts. For instance, Northwestern, Johns Hopkins and Georgetown have already said they are suspending all retirement contributions for faculty and staff. And this is what the wealthiest schools are doing.......I can't imagine more tuition dependent institutions bailing out non-revenue athletics over other parts of the university---namely academics. And this says nothing of the impending doom state education budgets will face....Its going to be a bloodbath in highered without significant federal support---which is unlikely to come.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, rpbobcat said:

From what I've read,there is no question that people who have had Covid develop some type of immunity.

The question is,how long does it last.

Apparently,depending on the strain,immunity can be very short lived.

Same thing,the articles I've read said they've never been successful in developing a covid vaccine.

One reason they said is that it mutates quickly and frequently.

As someone pointed out,they've been trying to develop an AIDS  vaccine since

the virus first appeared.

Still haven't been able to.

Covid does not mutate quickly-that information is incorrect. There has never been this type of incentive to develop a covid vaccine because the two most deadly coronavirus a (SARS and MERS) were not nearly as contagious and were stopped by epidemiology. 
 

Please don’t compare this virus to HIV-HIV is significantly more mutagenic and does a number of tricks such as integrating into the genome and entering into a latent state. 
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Billyhoyle said:

Covid does not mutate quickly-that information is incorrect.

Actually, I've heard that it does often  mutate- just not to the level of other diseases where it's likely it would require different vaccines and/or other meds. The mutations are virtually indistinguishable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, gimpeltf said:

Actually, I've heard that it does often  mutate- just not to the level of other diseases where it's likely it would require different vaccines and/or other meds. The mutations are virtually indistinguishable.

Of course it mutates- everything containing genetic material on earth mutates. My post said it does not mutate quickly, the implications of which are detailed in your post.  Viruses can escape vaccination through a number of mechanisms, one of which is to have enough genetic drift to render a prior vaccination ineffective.  And even in the case where there is a significant mutation rate and genetic drift, such as influenza, vaccination can still render partial immune whereby they may still get sick but have a more effective immune response to combat infection.  Viruses like HIV, HSV, HepC, etc are much tricker and have a number of complex ways beyond simply mutation of evading the immune system, limiting the efficacy of vaccination.  . 

Take HIV, for example.  Along with having an extraordinarily high rate of mutation, it infects the immune cells that combat the virus (T cells, dendritic cells, etc).  Because of this, simply having antibodies and T cells that can recognize and kill HIV isn't productive because HIV will infect the cells during the process of an immune response.  Furthermore, it will integrate integrate into the genomes of these cells and go into a latent state whereby it becomes invisible to the immune system and can "wait" to reemerge.  

 

There is strong evidence that protective antibodies alone are sufficient to prevent infection of SARS-Cov2 (a number of companies are in the process of manufacturing these antibodies for use as preventative treatment and therapeutics), it is generally accepted that people acquire long lasting immunity and the vaccine effort (at least one of the many strategies currently being tested) will prove successful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Billyhoyle said:

Of course it mutates- everything containing genetic material on earth mutates. My post said it does not mutate quickly, the implications of which are detailed in your post.  Viruses can escape vaccination through a number of mechanisms, one of which is to have enough genetic drift to render a prior vaccination ineffective.  And even in the case where there is a significant mutation rate and genetic drift, such as influenza, vaccination can still render partial immune whereby they may still get sick but have a more effective immune response to combat infection.  Viruses like HIV, HSV, HepC, etc are much tricker and have a number of complex ways beyond simply mutation of evading the immune system, limiting the efficacy of vaccination.  . 

Take HIV, for example.  Along with having an extraordinarily high rate of mutation, it infects the immune cells that combat the virus (T cells, dendritic cells, etc).  Because of this, simply having antibodies and T cells that can recognize and kill HIV isn't productive because HIV will infect the cells during the process of an immune response.  Furthermore, it will integrate integrate into the genomes of these cells and go into a latent state whereby it becomes invisible to the immune system and can "wait" to reemerge.  

 

There is strong evidence that protective antibodies alone are sufficient to prevent infection of SARS-Cov2 (a number of companies are in the process of manufacturing these antibodies for use as preventative treatment and therapeutics), it is generally accepted that people acquire long lasting immunity and the vaccine effort (at least one of the many strategies currently being tested) will prove successful

The number I heard yesterday was that there were thousands of minor mutation strains. That sounds pretty quick to me.

Not sure where that figure came from but I see now 14 strains. Still fairly quick for 6 months.

 

Just found one of those reports- will not claim as to accuracy. And do not dispute basic premise stated as to whether these mutations are that different.

Each strain of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus changes at an average speed of about one mutation per month. As of date, more than 10,000 strains had been sequenced by scientists around the globe, containing more than 4,300 mutations, according to the China National Centre for Bioinformation.

Edited by gimpeltf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Billyhoyle said:

Yes, for a couple of reasons.  The reason some are saying they are not certain is just out of an abundance of caution, since there will probably be a couple of anomalous exceptions (e.g. an immunocompromised individual who has an especially poor ability to develop immunity due to genetic or environmental factors). The vast majority of people will almost certainly be immune from reinfection-or if they are exposed to the virus again at a high enough level to evoke some type of illness, they will have enough of a protection against it to have a very mild disease (kind of like a booster shot in a vaccine). 

The best evidence is the following:

1.  Experiments carried out in monkeys demonstrate that protective immunity is developed.

2.  If people could get reinfected, at this point you would have seen hundreds of cases already in a place like NYC where 20% have been infected and many have recovered. The only reports of reinfection are scattered, possibly anomalous or more than likely due to a false negative/positive in a prior test.

3. The virus is successfully cleared by the immune system in >99% of individuals, generally due to an adaptive response.  When this happens, the body develops memory cells that are able to recognize a subsequent infection and respond more efficiently.  Protective antibodies have been detected in people who have previously been infected.  This virus does not have the features of those that are highly mutagenic (and thereby evade protective immunity) or could potentially co-opt protective antibodies (e.g. infect cells that recognize antibodies).  Scientists know a lot about viruses at this point, and while covid-19 is "novel" in that our immune systems have not previously been exposed to it, the identity of the genes that makeup the virus are not completely novel and are highly similar to other coronaviruses (especially SARS). 

The strange statement that the WHO put out a week or two ago about the potential for reinfection was very misleading regarding what is currently believed to be the consensus on this...Kind of like how their original statement on masks not being helpful was also misleading.  

I think I agree with points 1 & 2, but where are you getting the >99% from?

As far as I can tell there haven’t really been good numbers on what % of people have actually had it, rendering any death rate or comparable statistic really just a guess.  And how are you defining “successfully clearing”?  Not dying?  It seems there have been quite a few reports of longer-term damage as a result of the virus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, 1032004 said:

I think I agree with points 1 & 2, but where are you getting the >99% from?

As far as I can tell there haven’t really been good numbers on what % of people have actually had it, rendering any death rate or comparable statistic really just a guess.  And how are you defining “successfully clearing”?  Not dying?  It seems there have been quite a few reports of longer-term damage as a result of the virus.

See the Stanford study.  Search for Hoover Int and  Dr. Jay Bhattacharya for the last interview this past week, ~40 minutes and toward the end implication on #s lost if we remain locked down is discussed.   He also mentions numerous other studies that have performed representative statistical samples.  Most are seeing very similar results.  This was also linked in the other thread specifically about covid. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...