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33 minutes ago, Antitroll2828 said:

So for the record because of 1 clown ,scraplife is racist company and deserves what it’s getting

because a few cops are criminals so that means all of them are criminals and they deserve what they are getting 

only some protesters are violent and rioting but ignore them because some out of the group doesn’t represent them as whole 

hypocrisy 101 

 

So for the record, one police officer that you know says it is worse than 9/11, so that is the narrative you push?  Hypocrisy?

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1 hour ago, Antitroll2828 said:

I live in New York City where my friend had his head smashed in with bricks, where my nypd friend now needs multiple surgeries because he got jumped by 6 “peaceful protesters” almost all of manhatten is absolutely ravaged, they are throwing Molotov cocktails are cops on a nightly basis, the mayors daughter is hitting cops with rocks... 30 year veterans saying it’s worse then 9/11, over 20 cops up and quit for what’s happening to them and how they have no support from the top...that’s the scene from the ground, so until you look out a window and you see what looks like the purge outside then you can lecture me....

Your a clown my “Great great grand daddy” fought for the union and lost both his legs .... my best friend was undercover with antifa for years, you can repeat garbage talking points all you want but you clearly have no actual insight into this past was msnbc tells you.

 for the record my issue with this hasn’t nothing to do with race but what narrow minded people like yourself don’t realize is that black lives matter as an organization is a joke and u can literally go to there main page and see what the goals of these protests are, ( it’s not peace and love, it’s mayhem and destruction)

Black lives obviously matter just as much as anyone else but this BLM organization is corrupt as they come, the people not affiliated with them, that are coming out and marching are literally the best part of America, normal people marching against what they see as injustices but the problem is those voices won’t be heard because of the destruction by others. 

Judge Jean could not have said it better after 12 martinis. 

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44 minutes ago, lurk_nowitzki said:

Dude, 57 cops in buffalo resigned from their positions in solidarity with 2 officers who assaulted a 75 year old man then unflinchingly walked by his body as he laid on the ground with blood pouring from his ear. There's degrees to this. Yeah, derek chauvin is a monster, and most cops aren't THAT bad in comparison. But the problem is that cops protect other cops, even the derek chauvin's of the world. The "1% bad cops" argument is bull****. Just because a cop doesn't commit an act directly, doesn't mean he's not complicit. They all have the opportunity to weed out the bad apples, and time and time again they choose to prioritize the livelihood of their "brothers in blue" over the safety of the citizens they're sworn to protect. 

You mean like the Philly police inspector who has been charged by the DA with aggravated assault, and who was cheered by his fellow cops as he left the local FOP lodge to surrender?

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/philadelphia-police-officer-charged-protester-beating/2423648/

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2 hours ago, lurk_nowitzki said:

The first amendment exists to prevent the government from jailing people who speak out. It is not a free pass to say whatever you want with impunity and no risk of personal or professional ramifications. He exercised his right to expressed his opinion, and now he is facing the consequences, none of which are legal in nature.

If you read my post again you may notice that I never mentioned the 1st Amendment, which as you point out applies to government interference with our speech.  If we cannot respect the rights of fellow Americans to express opinions about political matters without trying to use mob rule to beat them down we have a problem in this country.  

 

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On 6/8/2020 at 11:33 AM, lurk_nowitzki said:

The first amendment exists to prevent the government from jailing people who speak out. It is not a free pass to say whatever you want with impunity and no risk of personal or professional ramifications. He exercised his right to expressed his opinion, and now he is facing the consequences, none of which are legal in nature.

i  

 

Edited by lu1979

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On 6/8/2020 at 11:33 AM, lurk_nowitzki said:

The first amendment exists to prevent the government from jailing people who speak out. It is not a free pass to say whatever you want with impunity and no risk of personal or professional ramifications. He exercised his right to expressed his opinion, and now he is facing the consequences, none of which are legal in nature.

If 

 

Edited by lu1979

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2 hours ago, lurk_nowitzki said:

The first amendment exists to prevent the government from jailing people who speak out. It is not a free pass to say whatever you want with impunity and no risk of personal or professional ramifications. He exercised his right to expressed his opinion, and now he is facing the consequences, none of which are legal in nature.

If you read my post again you may notice that I never mentioned the 1st Amendment, which as you point out applies to government interference with our speech.  If we cannot respect the rights of fellow Americans to express opinions about political matters without trying to use mob rule to beat them down we have a problem in this country.  You are free to agree or disagree with that sentiment.  

 

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"If we cannot respect the rights of fellow Americans to express opinions about political matters without trying to use mob rule to beat them down we have a problem in this country."   

The last few years have moved us way past that.

Edited by Coach_J

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8 minutes ago, lu1979 said:

If you read my post again you may notice that I never mentioned the 1st Amendment, which as you point out applies to government interference with our speech.  If we cannot respect the rights of fellow Americans to express opinions about political matters without trying to use mob rule to beat them down we have a problem in this country.  You are free to agree or disagree with that sentiment.  

 

so the "mob" isn't entitled to an opinion? the "mob" you speak of is just a bunch of people who are expressing their personal opinion, kinda like Don Beshada did.

Edited by lurk_nowitzki

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18 minutes ago, klehner said:

You mean like the Philly police inspector who has been charged by the DA with aggravated assault, and who was cheered by his fellow cops as he left the local FOP lodge to surrender?

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/philadelphia-police-officer-charged-protester-beating/2423648/

****ing horrifying. And upon further reading, the Temple student he assaulted and seriously injured was initially charged before video emerged of the incident. 

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A lot of supposedly grown adults (or maybe just antitroll) in this thread seem to have a big problem with personal responsibility and the free market. Scrap Life is a marketing brand. That means it's essential for its athletes to feel comfortable and confident representing it. When Beshada posted his screed, he made his own bed. Good for the young men who are sacrificing money to maintain their personal values. I remember a time when we used to encourage people to have strong, consistent values. 

I think the bigger issue at play here is that some people in this thread don't think Beshada is wrong and they see the overwhelming rejection of those beliefs and backlash as a rejection of themselves as well. Pure projection.

Btw, if you want to complain about the looting in Manhattan, you should blame your boys in blue. They chose to ignore the looters and instead focus on attacking the organized protest that wasn't looting. They did this because a protest against police brutality is far more offensive to them than the looting of businesses. For an explicit demonstration of this attitude look no further than the shameful displays in Buffalo and Philly where a large crowd of cops waited outside the courthouses to cheer on their fellow officers who were leaving their court hearings for brutal assault on unarmed protesters. The absolute contempt for the society and law you're supposed to protect it takes to cheer an officer who brutally assaulted a 75 year old man, unprovoked, is shocking and must see for Americans who don't understand how out of control some of these PDs have grown. I come from a family with a strong law enforcement background, so it pains me to see. When somebody tells you who they are, you should believe them. American police have been telling us who they are for a while now. Time to listen.

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1 minute ago, lurk_nowitzki said:

so the "mob" isn't entitled to an opinion?

They are absolutely entitled to their opinion and I will always defend their right to have it even when I strongly disagree with it.  That should stay a two way street in America.  When it doesn't we are all poorer for it.

 

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1 minute ago, lurk_nowitzki said:

****ing horrifying. And upon further reading, the Temple student he assaulted and seriously injured was initially charged before video emerged of the incident. 

That's how it goes in America. 

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24 minutes ago, lu1979 said:

They are absolutely entitled to their opinion and I will always defend their right to have it even when I strongly disagree with it.  That should stay a two way street in America.  When it doesn't we are all poorer for it.

 

Let's assume that in years past NFL teams did not sign Colin Kapernick because his political beliefs would have negatively impacted their bottom line. As far as I know, there was nothing illegal about that.

Further, I don't think there was anything wrong with that. Kapernick knew that voicing an unpopular opinion would have consequences. That's the way things have always been in this country, and -- in my opinion -- the way things should be.

What's the alternative? Having the government require people to spend their money in ways they don't want to?

Edited by Katie

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3 hours ago, DoubleHalf said:

All the white people on here complaining how their opinions are being infringed upon are completely laughable... I in no way condone people rioting, looting and destroying businesses but they are a very very small percentage of the people protesting. 
 

How any person can say this is dumb or a waste of time is on the wrong side of history. These protests are larger than the civil rights movements in the 60s and taking place all over the world. Police brutality is not a partisan issue and it is simply a fact that blacks are targeted much more often than whites. Why is it a problem to want to change that? Blacks have the lowest average income of any race in the US. They are the most incarcerated of any race in a country that incarcerates 5 times as many people as the next closest country. There has been a decentralized oppression that has fed itself for years. If you agree with the constitution or any religious teachings that everyone is created equal, why would you be anything but supportive of people wanting to be treated fairly and equally under the law? 
 

Just because the media whether it be Fox News or CNN sensationalize everything And it wears on you, doesn’t mean the protests are ‘bad’ or not warranted. People on here whining about how their disturbing opinions are not being respected really need to get a clue. Would your opinion have been blacks should not have been land owners? That women should never have had the right to vote? Movements like this are what produce progress. If you are against that progress and equality of every human on the planet, then you better believe people are going to come after you because you would be the kind of person standing in front of positive progress.

People need to get over themselves, no one is infringing on your opinion. Go shout from the rooftops how you don’t want equality, just be ready for the consequences.
 

 

 

3 hours ago, jchapman said:

Explain how kneeling during the national Anthem is disrespectful, and who it is disrespectful to.

It only bothers folks because it bothered Trump.  If Trump never said a word about it, nobody would have noticed or cared.  
 

Folks who think the NFL will “suffer” from the Drew Brees debacle are clueless.  There is such a craving for sports, namely football, that ratings will be higher than ever.  The kneeling will send Trump into a tizzy...which will be super fun to watch as well.  

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7 minutes ago, tightwaist said:

 

It only bothers folks because it bothered Trump.  If Trump never said a word about it, nobody would have noticed or cared.  
 

Folks who think the NFL will “suffer” from the Drew Brees debacle are clueless.  There is such a craving for sports, namely football, that ratings will be higher than ever.  The kneeling will send Trump into a tizzy...which will be super fun to watch as well.  

I think a lot of conservatives want the NFL to suffer because of the Brees thing because it validates their world view that they are the true oppressed class of people in this country. In reality, the whole thing is already over. Drew came out and made a strong statement, acknowledging that he was wrong and how he could do better. His peers have accepted that apology. The only people I see who are still talking about it are the people who were outraged that he had to apologize in the first place. Nobody whines for safe spaces more than conservatives in this country. Fox News had a whole segment today about how a donut shop in Rhode Island is no longer offering police discounts. These poor cops now have to pay the same price as everybody else for their fried dough. In other words, Rhode Island has fallen to Antifa.

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5 minutes ago, uncle bernard said:

I think a lot of conservatives want the NFL to suffer because of the Brees thing because it validates their world view that they are the true oppressed class of people in this country. In reality, the whole thing is already over. Drew came out and made a strong statement, acknowledging that he was wrong and how he could do better. His peers have accepted that apology. The only people I see who are still talking about it are the people who were outraged that he had to apologize in the first place. Nobody whines for safe spaces more than conservatives in this country. Fox News had a whole segment today about how a donut shop in Rhode Island is no longer offering police discounts. These poor cops now have to pay the same price as everybody else for their fried dough. In other words, Rhode Island has fallen to Antifa.

Unfortunately, Fox/Trump and their cult followers are on the wrong side of history.  They just don’t know it yet.  

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14 minutes ago, uncle bernard said:

I think a lot of conservatives want the NFL to suffer because of the Brees thing because it validates their world view that they are the true oppressed class of people in this country. In reality, the whole thing is already over. Drew came out and made a strong statement, acknowledging that he was wrong and how he could do better. His peers have accepted that apology. The only people I see who are still talking about it are the people who were outraged that he had to apologize in the first place. Nobody whines for safe spaces more than conservatives in this country. Fox News had a whole segment today about how a donut shop in Rhode Island is no longer offering police discounts. These poor cops now have to pay the same price as everybody else for their fried dough. In other words, Rhode Island has fallen to Antifa.

Well said. If you  still stand behind Trump at this point, there is virtually nothing he can do that's going to change that.

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At the end of the day, if majority of people don't learn how to listen for the sake of listening instead of trying to debate or personally attack every time there is a different thought or opinion....it's never going to get better.  Goes for all sides.  And that has absolutely nothing to do with Trump, or CNN, or Fox, or left or right.  It is strictly a personal decision for each and every person.

Now days, people don't want to hear your opinion, the only thing acceptable is their opinion coming out of your mouth.

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4 hours ago, jchapman said:

Explain how kneeling during the national Anthem is disrespectful, and who it is disrespectful to.

I've never heard a good answer to this question.

To people who say: "To our military, to our veterans! To those who died for our country!"

I'd say the following: Those people died supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States, as per their oath. If Colin Kaepernick and others think that the Constitutionally guaranteed rights of American citizens (that Americans fought and died for, mind you) are not being upheld, perhaps we need to make sure that Americans didn't die fighting for the rights of some, and not others. Maybe those football players have a point.

Edited by Le duke

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"The right for those athletes, and all Americans, to protest is one we all pledged to defend with our lives if necessary.  Far from disrespecting our troops, there is no finer form of appreciation for our sacrifice than for Americans to enthusiastically exercise their freedom of speech."  So says several military vets 

-----------------------

In 1947, former Army officer Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball. Robinson experienced taunts, epithets, and threats of violence for simply standing up to the status quo of segregation in America.

Since 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick engaged in a silent protest to bring attention to the state of emergency facing people of color in America, a chorus of detractors have lined up to denounce his stand, or more accurately his sit. Fans have burned his jersey. A presidential candidate suggested he leave the country. Many have claimed his protest disrespected American veterans.

Jackie Robinson isn’t here today to tell us what he would think of Kaepernick’s protest. But he did convey the same sentiment about the national anthem as Kaepernick in his 1972 autobiography, writing, “I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world.”

As military veterans, we write to express our support for the tradition of advocacy by athletes that is embodied by Jackie Robinson and carried on by Colin Kaepernick.

For generations, American athletes have used their public voice to force our collective attention towards the crises and issues that challenge our national conscience. Jackie Robinson, Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Tommie Smith, John Carlos, Ariyana Smith, the Minnesota Lynx, the Missouri Tigers football team, and stars across professional sports declaring that #BlackLivesMatter, are all part of a brave tradition of protest by athletes. Far from an anomaly, athletes leading on social change has been the norm in America. The right for those athletes, and all Americans, to protest is one we all pledged to defend with our lives if necessary. Far from disrespecting our troops, there is no finer form of appreciation for our sacrifice than for Americans to enthusiastically exercise their freedom of speech.

While we would not all personally choose to protest in a manner identical to Kaepernick, we respect and honor his choice, and whole heartedly join him in stating unequivocally that BLACK LIVES MATTER. The current state of affairs for people of color in America is unsustainable and unacceptable. According to analysis by the Washington Postblack people in America are two and a half times more likely to be shot and killed by police than white Americans. Far too often, people of color are dying at the hands of law enforcement personnel in the streets, our jails, and their homes. Indictments are rare and convictions are essentially nonexistent.

This status quo outrages us as men and women who raised our right hands and pledged to defend, with our lives if necessary, a Constitution that proclaims intent to “establish justice, insure domestic tranquility,” and “secure the Blessings of Liberty.” Those ideals are simply not being upheld for all Americans.

As veterans, we implore all Americans to find your own way to challenge this status quo and advocate for “a more perfect union.” Your method of protest may not be to refrain from the traditions surrounding our national symbols, and it doesn’t have to be. You have the same right as Colin Kaepernick to choose whether and how to advocate, a right we support and served for. However you choose to use your voice, please do so with an understanding that many veterans do not condemn the protest of activists like Jackie Robinson, Colin Kaepernick and everyday Americans seeking justice. Indeed, we see no higher form of patriotism.

  • Eric Baker, United States Army Veteran
  • Bill Barton, United States Air Force Veteran
  • Robert Bateman, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Jason Bensley, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Stephen Benson, United States Navy Veteran: Vietnam War
  • Keith Boyea, United States Air Force Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Xavier Burgos, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Tony Camerino, United States Air Force Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Stephanie Driessel, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • LeighAnn Dunn, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • David Ramiro Duran, United States Army Veteran
  • Robin Eckstein, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Rick Hegdahl, United States Navy Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Chris Holman, United States Army Veteran
  • Melanie Howie, United States Air Force Veteran
  • Mitchell Howie, United States Air Force Veteran
  • Keith Jeffreys, United States Army Veteran
  • Tara Jones, United States Navy Veteran: Gulf War Era
  • Jason Macon, United States Marine Corps Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Lamar Mapp, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Brian McGough, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Neal McGough, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Andrew Nixon, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Parker Ormsby, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Matt Osborne, United States Army Veteran
  • Jackie Rodgers, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Terron Sims II, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Richard Allen Smith, United States Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Shannon Smyth, United States Air Force Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Ryan Sullivan, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Mike Stark, United States Marine Corps Veteran
  • Armondo Telles, United States Marine Corps Veteran
  • Catherine Trombley, United States Air Force Veteran
  • Colm Walker, United Staes Army Veteran: Operation Enduring Freedom
  • Bobby Wise, United States Army Veteran: Operation Iraqi Freedom

 

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23 minutes ago, Le duke said:

I've never heard a good answer to this question.

To people who say: "To our military, to our veterans! To those who died for our country!"

I'd say the following: Those people died supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States, as per their oath. If Colin Kaepernick and others think that the Constitutionally guaranteed rights of American citizens (that Americans fought and died for, mind you) are not being upheld, perhaps we need to make sure that Americans didn't die fighting for the rights of some, and not others. Maybe those football players have a point.

My son is a former wrestler and current Army Airborne Ranger and veteran of Iraq.  We talk about this all the time and he's pretty clear.  He and others fight to protect rights those in other countries aren't allowed to exercise.  Does he stand during the anthem?  Yes.  Is he offended if others choose to kneel?  No.  Why?  Because that's a right Americans are privileged to enjoy.  Unlike North Korea, Iran, Belarus, and other places, citizens here don't have to stand, sit, kneel, etc., when commanded.  That's the beauty of being an American. You want to live somewhere where you're forced to stand, bow, or dance when the great leader enters--or else--plenty of places to go for that.  Thank God America is not one of those places and we should all pray it never is.

IMG_20171225_105654.jpg 

Jake0704.jpg

Edited by Coach_J

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 I never really cared about the people kneeling, but people realy forget things quick huh.   I'm surprised Brees is getting so much heat...Didn't the NFL literally try (but I believe failed) to make a rule telling players they risked a fine if they knelt during the anthem? 

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8 hours ago, DoubleHalf said:

All the white people on here complaining how their opinions are being infringed upon are completely laughable... I in no way condone people rioting, looting and destroying businesses but they are a very very small percentage of the people protesting. 
 

How any person can say this is dumb or a waste of time is on the wrong side of history. These protests are larger than the civil rights movements in the 60s and taking place all over the world. Police brutality is not a partisan issue and it is simply a fact that blacks are targeted much more often than whites. Why is it a problem to want to change that? Blacks have the lowest average income of any race in the US. They are the most incarcerated of any race in a country that incarcerates 5 times as many people as the next closest country. There has been a decentralized oppression that has fed itself for years. If you agree with the constitution or any religious teachings that everyone is created equal, why would you be anything but supportive of people wanting to be treated fairly and equally under the law? 
 

Just because the media whether it be Fox News or CNN sensationalize everything And it wears on you, doesn’t mean the protests are ‘bad’ or not warranted. People on here whining about how their disturbing opinions are not being respected really need to get a clue. Would your opinion have been blacks should not have been land owners? That women should never have had the right to vote? Movements like this are what produce progress. If you are against that progress and equality of every human on the planet, then you better believe people are going to come after you because you would be the kind of person standing in front of positive progress.

People need to get over themselves, no one is infringing on your opinion. Go shout from the rooftops how you don’t want equality, just be ready for the consequences.
 

 

Well Double half I must take issue with a couple of things that you say/imply.  I for one am a great backer of equality and fully support all people being treated fairly and equally before the law.  I believe that those beliefs are shared with the vast majority of Americans of all ethnic backgrounds.  So I guess the disagreement I may have with you is where does this country that I love and admire so much stand today as far as approaching that lofty goal.  Beyond that how do we advance the USA towards that positive progress that you say you want and seem to have decided that the rest of us "people who need to get over ourselves"  are against. 

First as to where the USA stands today - I am not sure how old you are DH but I will soon be 64 and like to think that I have a pretty solid understanding of history.  The USA (like all societies since the beginning of human civilization) has a long history of racial conflict and racism.  The African Americans along with the Native Americans have received the worst of that treatment over the years.   The US ended slavery in 1865 and after a brief time when equal rights started to emerge in the South there was a massive backlash fueled by white racism and the Jim Crow were instituted in the South.  In the rest of the country there wasn't the legal structure set up to enforce the separate and unequal treatment of whites and blacks but there was plenty of racism and discrimination that was widely accepted.  The same types of racist attitudes largely existed throughout all of the other countries of the world also.  

So what is racism?  More than anything else it is an attitude held by people that they are inherently better than another group of people due to perceived superficial differences in looks. In point of fact there is one human race and the so called differences are rather arbitrary and cosmetic.  Still I believe it would be impossible for any fair minded person to deny that within the a large percentage white population of this country there was an attitude that somehow blacks were somehow inferior to whites.  I do wish that we somehow have a graph of how those racist attitudes changes over the years in this country.  I believe it would show a very steady decrease (yes it lagged in the South) especially after WW2.   The desegregation of the military by Truman and the desegregation of sports in both the pro leagues and the colleges were both symptoms and drivers of that change in attitudes.  When the 1960s arrived and the civil rights movement hit America faced a major test and I believe the majority of white Americans (probably not a majority in the South) decided that we should honor the values expressed in of Declaration of Independence and codified in our Constitution.  I was to young to remember when Dr. King gave his I have a Dream speech in 1963.  I think it affected and convinced a lot of people then and I know it has had an affect on me over the years.   The laws of this land were changed then and  have continued to evolve to a point that on the books discrimination is a clear violation of the laws of this land.  As white and black people spent more time in each others company in school, work, and other areas of life a more important change took place.  I have seen the change in attitudes across generations.  If racism exists in the hearts and minds of people then the level of improvement in this country over the last century is amazing. My parents generation were less racist than my grandparents and my generation less than them.  The kids coming up today abhor the very thought of racism.  I may just be naive of plain stupid but I just don't believe that there are that many white people left in this country that believe that white people are somehow better or superior in any way to their black brothers and sisters.  I think the vast majority of all Americans want to see all people treated with full equality and receive full and equal treatment before the law.  

So if I am right about racism being a thing of the past with the vast majority of white people, why are we where we are today.  How do you explain the issues highlight in your second paragraph (poverty, incarceration rates, police brutality etc)?  Well those are very complicated issues and I am sure no one wants to hear me running off at the mouth any more. 

So I am going to cut to the chase and ask where do we go from here?  There are millions of African American kids in this country growing up right now and what should they be hearing from the adults of this country.  What should they be hearing from the millions of African Americans who have found their way to great success here?  Should they tell them they can't succeed due to horrible systemic racism and institutional racism that exists in this awful country?  Or do we tell them that their success depends on their own actions, is in their own hands.  This starts with education, and is rooted in work ethic.  I think all of the successful African Americans and people from every ethnic background can deliver this message.   I firmly believe that the route to the American Dream is open to everyone in this country and depends on making good choices and avoiding bad choices in life.  By all means let's be there to coach them and guide them.   I have been coaching wrestlers for years and have never told any of them that the refs suck and to go out and complain to them.  I have told them to work hard at building their strength skill, and stamina.  I have preached to them to worry about what they can control and not to be distracted by things they can't.

Well DH I do apologize for rambling on so much and I won't blame you if you don't bother to read it.  This stuff does bother me and I sincerely hope that this country can come together and do the right things especially for the kids of this country.  The best to you and I hope we can get back to wrestling soon.

 

Edited by lu1979

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