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USA Wrestling--Black Male Athletes' Experience

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6 hours ago, GockeS said:

no.  there is a book called 'drive' about what motivates us

What about a boarding school for children in poverty that provides the education and life structure to succeed? 

It really is about poverty... when you are already a year behind at only four years old, it truly is harder to improve regardless of your intrinsic motivation.  Somebody once said that in looking for people to hire (some keys to a successful life), you look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy (drive).  Intrinsic motivation is great so long as you have the resources (money, mentors, know how to read, etc) and the security (food, shelter, safety) to act on it.  It seems crazy but I'm not against paying criminals not to commit crimes if that helps create a better environment for the people that have the drive to better their life.  

Edited by jross
added links for context to the comments

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19 hours ago, jross said:

  

What about a boarding school for children in poverty that provides the education and life structure to succeed? 

It really is about poverty... when you are already a year behind at only four years old, it truly is harder to improve regardless of your intrinsic motivation.  Somebody once said that in looking for people to hire (some keys to a successful life), you look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy (drive).  Intrinsic motivation is great so long as you have the resources (money, mentors, know how to read, etc) and the security (food, shelter, safety) to act on it.  It seems crazy but I'm not against paying criminals not to commit crimes if that helps create a better environment for the people that have the drive to better their life.  

so in other words...give them new parents...or guardians, boarding school...

many criminals make more money than the payments could provide

 

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Yes, allow qualified parents the option to send their kids to boarding school, free of charge.  Note that the experiment about reducing violent crimes through incentive and other means has claimed success in Richmond.  The article has good information... much is extracted below.

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Violent victimization and exposure to gun violence has long-term, even fatal, consequences for youth, particularly African American males. Research demonstrates that violence impacts African American youth, particularly boys, at much higher rates than their White and Hispanic counterparts (Children’s Defense Fund, 2013).  In California, homicide is the second leading cause of death for all youth ages 10 to 24, with the large majority of homicides committed using firearms. However, for African American youth in the same age range, homicide is the leading cause of death (Violence Policy Center, 2014).  Youth who are responsible for gun violence typically also commit other crimes and are commonly victims of violence themselves, encountering long-term developmental consequences (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2001).

While these youth are in urgent need of assistance, there is often a lack of appropriate services available for them. It is very difficult to coordinate and implement comprehensive programming and services that effectively address such a wide range of risk factors and needs, while engaging a population that often refuses traditional community-based services due to isolation or lack of trust (Holden, McGregor, Blanks, & Mahaffey, 2012). 

Through its street outreach strategy, the ONS has been effective in developing a rapport with Richmond community members affected or at risk of being affected by gun violence. From 2010 to 2013, NCAs annually facilitated an average of 2,994 outreach contacts, provided attention-intensive support and mentoring for an average of 150 individuals, and provided an average of 319 referrals to services.  Fellows range in age from 14 to 25 years. The large majority (97%) of fellows are African American. About half of fellows (45%) are fathers. About one fifth (21%) were victims of gun violence prior to participating in the Fellowship. While the Fellowship engages youth at high risk for involvement in gun violence, it is important to note that the Fellowship is not a diversion program. 

This process evaluation highlighted that 94% of Fellowship participants currently remain alive and 79% of participants have not been arrested or charged for gun-related offenses since enrolling in the Fellowship. Moreover, it revealed that across the board, fellows showed improvements in personal outcomes including education, employment, meeting individual goals, improving self-esteem, and living a healthier lifestyle.

Overall, Fellowship participants reported that involvement in the Fellowship was a transformative experience that altered their worldviews—and subsequently their lives. “[The Fellowship] changed me,” said one fellow. “[Now] I don’t carry guns, and I don’t hang with guys with guns. I push myself away from that.” Another noted, “I have seen I could do better. I see people trying to help me. I have realized that life is bigger than North Richmond and street life. I don’t have to limit myself.” 

In addition to low levels of death and injury among fellows, the Fellowship has also helped participants make progress in other key personal areas. For example, since enrolling in the Fellowship, 20% of fellows have received their GED or high school diploma, 10% enrolled in college or vocational training, and 50% obtained employment at some point during the fellowship. Fellows interviewed for this evaluation also reported beneficial experiences they have had through the Fellowship, including setting and meeting goals, developing a sense of responsibility and accountability, and transforming their perspective and worldview, as well as tangible outcomes such as obtaining a driver’s license and becoming employed. These improvements contribute to fellows’ overall ability to transform their lives, improve their self esteem, and continue on a healthy, productive path.

 

 

Edited by jross

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