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CoachJSS

NCAA D I Wrestling in a dire place

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In the 20-21 season (If there's a season) NCAA Division I wrestling will have 79 schools competing. With the potential and probable losses of Stanford and Fresno St that will leave us with 77, if there are no other schools dropped, and according to some people, there will be a few more dropped.

Out of those 77, only 72 are true Division I schools. Lock Haven, Bloomsburg , Edinboro, and Clarion are D II schools while Franklin & Marshall is a D III school. All 5 schools were grandfathered into Division I.

There are 357 Division I schools and with only 72 true Division I sponsoring wrestling that's only 20% of the Division I schools. These crooked AD's use that as an excuse. Both Stanford and Fresno St alluded to that there were not a plethora of schools that offered men's wrestling and used that as a reason to cut their programs. 

So where does that leave NCAA Men's I wrestling? In a dire situation.

The potential loses of Stanford and Fresno St have (for now) have completely decimated Division I West Coast Wrestling. California is a great wrestling state with a deep talent pool and will only have 3 D I teams in the 21-22 season, and one of those teams is self funded. Where does Cal Baptist (when D I eligible) CSUB, Cal Poly, ASU, and Oregon St go for a conference? Arkansas-LR can go to the SoCon or something like that but where do these other schools go, now that the PAC 12 Conference has been gutted? 

I don't like being pessimistic because for the last few years we did see some growth with some new programs at Arkansas-LR and Presbyterian, and with 2 schools moving up from D II to D I, Cal Baptist and Bellarmine. We have seen another potential school, Western Carolina, being recommended to start a D I program. However this happens to far and few.

So in this dire situation, is there hope? I think there is.

Mike Moyer mentioned early in the pandemic that many of the mid major schools where becoming dependent on enrollment, like many of the D II, D III, & NAIA schools. Schools, like Western Carolina, who need students can attract 60 athletes by adding a men's and women's wrestling team. If D I schools decide to add men's wrestling it will probably come along with a women's team as well.

The schools that could add will be mid major schools with low enrollment. Unfortunately the power 5 schools don't need wrestling, as Stanford is making clear. Fresno St is a mid major, but the enrollment is big enough were having extra sports is not needed.

In California I can't imagine public schools needing to add wrestling. However, I can see schools in the West Coast Conference adding wrestling. This is from the 18-19 school year https://www.univstats.com/comparison/west-coast-conference/student-population/

You'll notice low male enrollment numbers for schools like St. Mary's, Univ of Pacific, Pepperdine Univ, USD, Univ of Portland etc.....8 of those schools have enrollment numbers under 10k. Here's one thing that I would think would help is capping athletic scholarship. If a conference like the West Coast Conference added wrestling, each school could cap the scholarships at 4.5 for men and 4.5 for women. That will cut down expenses. As a wrestling community we are looking opportunity. It would be nice if all schools were 9.9 but if 10 schools wanted to add wrestling and only give half of the allotted scholarships then so be it.

Anyway, it looks bad right now, and it could get worse if more schools continue to feel the pinch of the pandemic. Hopefully these mid major schools continue to need students and are looking for cost effective sports such as wrestling. My hope is that Division I wrestling can get up to 100 schools by 2025. It's a dream, but it's more fun to dream then be in despair.

 

 

 

Edited by CoachJSS

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HS wrestling is and always has been popular (no-cut and no equipment needed) and MMA has become increasingly popular over the last 10+ yrs. You'd think that between these two factors, college wrestling would be on the rise. I would expect colleges would want to create amateur opportunities in popular sports and I'd also expect fans of MMA would have an interest in its "minor league". I'd be wrong on all counts.

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1 hour ago, CoachJSS said:

 

 

In the 20-21 season (If there's a season) NCAA Division I wrestling will have 79 schools competing. With the potential and probable losses of Stanford and Fresno St that will leave us with 77, if there are no other schools dropped, and according to some people, there will be a few more dropped.

Out of those 77, only 72 are true Division I schools. Lock Haven, Bloomsburg , Edinboro, and Clarion are D II schools while Franklin & Marshall is a D III school. All 5 schools were grandfathered into Division I.

There are 357 Division I schools and with only 72 true Division I sponsoring wrestling that's only 20% of the Division I schools. These crooked AD's use that as an excuse. Both Stanford and Fresno St alluded to that there were not a plethora of schools that offered men's wrestling and used that as a reason to cut their programs. 

So where does that leave NCAA Men's I wrestling? In a dire situation.

The potential loses of Stanford and Fresno St have (for now) have completely decimated Division I West Coast Wrestling. California is a great wrestling state with a deep talent pool and will only have 3 D I teams in the 21-22 season, and one of those teams is self funded. Where does Cal Baptist (when D I eligible) CSUB, Cal Poly, ASU, and Oregon St go for a conference? Arkansas-LR can go to the SoCon or something like that but where do these other schools go, now that the PAC 12 Conference has been gutted? 

I don't like being pessimistic because for the last few years we did see some growth with some new programs at Arkansas-LR and Presbyterian, and with 2 schools moving up from D II to D I, Cal Baptist and Bellarmine. We have seen another potential school, Western Carolina, being recommended to start a D I program. However this happens to far and few.

So in this dire situation, is there hope? I think there is.

Mike Moyer mentioned early in the pandemic that many of the mid major schools where becoming dependent on enrollment, like many of the D II, D III, & NAIA schools. Schools, like Western Carolina, who need students can attract 60 athletes by adding a men's and women's wrestling team. If D I schools decide to add men's wrestling it will probably come along with a women's team as well.

The schools that could add will be mid major schools with low enrollment. Unfortunately the power 5 schools don't need wrestling, as Stanford is making clear. Fresno St is a mid major, but the enrollment is big enough were having extra sports is not needed.

In California I can't imagine public schools needing to add wrestling. However, I can see schools in the West Coast Conference adding wrestling. This is from the 18-19 school year https://www.univstats.com/comparison/west-coast-conference/student-population/

You'll notice low male enrollment numbers for schools like St. Mary's, Univ of Pacific, Pepperdine Univ, USD, Univ of Portland etc.....8 of those schools have enrollment numbers under 10k. Here's one thing that I would think would help is capping athletic scholarship. If a conference like the West Coast Conference added wrestling, each school could cap the scholarships at 4.5 for men and 4.5 for women. That will cut down expenses. As a wrestling community we are looking opportunity. It would be nice if all schools were 9.9 but if 10 schools wanted to add wrestling and only give half of the allotted scholarships then so be it.

Anyway, it looks bad right now, and it could get worse if more schools continue to feel the pinch of the pandemic. Hopefully these mid major schools continue to need students and are looking for cost effective sports such as wrestling. My hope is that Division I wrestling can get up to 100 schools by 2025. It's a dream, but it's more fun to dream then be in despair.

 

 

 

I always wonder (and will never know) how many non-FBS schools actually operate at the bare minimum half of maximum scholarships (across all sports, meaning 13 for basketball would mean they could skimp on 6.5 somewhere else) offered...but if they added women's wrestling and had to balance things out, would be 4.95 for men and 5.0 for women. (although Western Carolina stated they'd operate at 9.9 for men and fewer than half the max for women)

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1 hour ago, CoachJSS said:

 

You'll notice low male enrollment numbers for schools like St. Mary's, Univ of Pacific, Pepperdine Univ, USD, Univ of Portland etc.....8 of those schools have enrollment numbers under 10k. Here's one thing that I would think would help is capping athletic scholarship. If a conference like the West Coast Conference added wrestling, each school could cap the scholarships at 4.5 for men and 4.5 for women. That will cut down expenses. As a wrestling community we are looking opportunity. It would be nice if all schools were 9.9 but if 10 schools wanted to add wrestling and only give half of the allotted scholarships then so be it.

 

This makes sense...I mean it's basically the D3 model outside of 4-5 scholarships.   But if you have a roster of 20+ you will more than make that up.

And D3 seems to be where the growth has been recently.   Maybe they should add wrestling at this place - https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2020/10/19/colby-college-defies-downturn-with-200-million-facility-and-a-pledge-for-sports/#79008d3c1d82

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Good post.  I hope your enthusiasm pans out.  I know that your optimism has made mens volleyball and gymnastics fans hopeful.  Volleyball down to just over 20 programs and men's gymnastics has only TEN division 1 programs left.  Sheesh.

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Wrestling is certainly not alone in being endangered.  As noted above, men's gymnastics is basically going the way to being a club sport for purposes of feeding olympic hopefuls.  A very sad decline over the past few decades.

And concerning Big 10 sports more on par with wrestling, Michigan State today eliminated their swimming and diving programs.  

 

 

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2 hours ago, Hey Now said:

Good post.  I hope your enthusiasm pans out.  I know that your optimism has made mens volleyball and gymnastics fans hopeful.  Volleyball down to just over 20 programs and men's gymnastics has only TEN division 1 programs left.  Sheesh.

Men's volleyball at the D I and D II level are small, which is why they combine for a national tournament. However, D III has their own NCAA Championship because they have 111 schools that sponsor the sport. That's a decent amount, much like D III wrestling. Men's  gymnastics hasn't been relevant in years.

The one thing that wrestling has that those 2 sports don't have is big participation numbers at the high school level. Almost 250k boys wrestle which is far ahead of boys volleyball.

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10 hours ago, Fletcher said:

HS wrestling is and always has been popular (no-cut and no equipment needed) and MMA has become increasingly popular over the last 10+ yrs. You'd think that between these two factors, college wrestling would be on the rise. I would expect colleges would want to create amateur opportunities in popular sports and I'd also expect fans of MMA would have an interest in its "minor league". I'd be wrong on all counts.

I wouldn't be surprised if HS participation numbers were very high. Doesn't make any difference. The problem is that wrestling isn't readily consummable by the mass public and the number of people that show up for events is relatively miniscule. I've heard of numbers like 15,000 at some big school meets like in Iowa, Ohio State, or PSU, but is even 15,000 per event to cover the costs of those premium programs? This is purely a "bang for the bucks" decision by different D1 schools. Check out the article linked below. Wrestling isn't the only sport being cut, either. 

What bothers me is the lack of loyalty to those programs because of 1 bad fiscal year, a year bad because of an unfortunate pandemic, and the school can't bother to just endure the loss in the short term to protect those programs long term. This is "corporate" short term thinking, and dumber than hell. This is what happens when bureaucrats try to run a university like a business. It's unethical to run a university like it's a business (unless it's a complete scam diploma mill, in which case the money is the only point). 

https://apnews.com/article/14a9b95d892dfde558900c8a11f429b3

The coronavirus pandemic forced a dramatic and painful decision: Faced with a nearly $25 million deficit next year, Stanford became the first known Power Five school to eliminate athletic programs because of the pandemic, announcing Wednesday that 11 of its 36 varsity sports will be shuttered next year.

The school will discontinue men’s and women’s fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men’s rowing, co-ed and women’s sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men’s volleyball and wrestling after the 2020-21 academic year. Stanford also is eliminating 20 support staff positions.

 

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5 hours ago, Hey Now said:

Good post.  I hope your enthusiasm pans out.  I know that your optimism has made mens volleyball and gymnastics fans hopeful.  Volleyball down to just over 20 programs and men's gymnastics has only TEN division 1 programs left.  Sheesh.

Wow, shocked at the gymnastics. Only 10 mens programs. That 1 decent sized conference. 

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11 hours ago, SetonHallPirate said:

I always wonder (and will never know) how many non-FBS schools actually operate at the bare minimum half of maximum scholarships (across all sports, meaning 13 for basketball would mean they could skimp on 6.5 somewhere else) offered...but if they added women's wrestling and had to balance things out, would be 4.95 for men and 5.0 for women. (although Western Carolina stated they'd operate at 9.9 for men and fewer than half the max for women)

This isn't fair, for every one female that would want to Wrestle in College, there is what? 100, 500, 1000 males (I have no idea, but the ratio would be overwhelming)  Wrestling is all good it teaches Teamwork, Hard Work (Do any College Sport Teams work as hard as Wrestlers? I doubt it)  Meritocracy (You get out of it, what you put into it, and if you work hard you will improve, (Wrestling is basically who works hardest improves the most) Goal setting, etc. Wrestling  basically shows us the importance of the values we were all taught in school.

Wrestling basically gives people a chance to participate regardless of size  with some rare exceptions like too small though International has lower weights.

The more spots not available will leave many with nothing to do, which is not good, what just concentrate on Academics? Party?   EVERY COLLEGE SHOULD HAVE A WRESTLING TEAM.

Edited by dougb

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4 hours ago, TobusRex said:

I wouldn't be surprised if HS participation numbers were very high. Doesn't make any difference. The problem is that wrestling isn't readily consummable by the mass public and the number of people that show up for events is relatively miniscule. I've heard of numbers like 15,000 at some big school meets like in Iowa, Ohio State, or PSU, but is even 15,000 per event to cover the costs of those premium programs? This is purely a "bang for the bucks" decision by different D1 schools. Check out the article linked below. Wrestling isn't the only sport being cut, either. 

What bothers me is the lack of loyalty to those programs because of 1 bad fiscal year, a year bad because of an unfortunate pandemic, and the school can't bother to just endure the loss in the short term to protect those programs long term. This is "corporate" short term thinking, and dumber than hell. This is what happens when bureaucrats try to run a university like a business. It's unethical to run a university like it's a business (unless it's a complete scam diploma mill, in which case the money is the only point). 

https://apnews.com/article/14a9b95d892dfde558900c8a11f429b3

The coronavirus pandemic forced a dramatic and painful decision: Faced with a nearly $25 million deficit next year, Stanford became the first known Power Five school to eliminate athletic programs because of the pandemic, announcing Wednesday that 11 of its 36 varsity sports will be shuttered next year.

The school will discontinue men’s and women’s fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men’s rowing, co-ed and women’s sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men’s volleyball and wrestling after the 2020-21 academic year. Stanford also is eliminating 20 support staff positions.

 

Don’t let them fool you, Stanford (and Brown/Dartmouth) didn’t cut those sports because of money.  

They did it because they want athletes to be a smaller percentage of the student body.  For the Ivies especially, I think the recent Harvard lawsuit filed by Asian-Americans played a role, since they essentially admitted (what we all knew) that athletes got preferential treatment in the admissions process and allow students into the school with worse academics than most of the rest of the students.  I think the one hope that the Stanford wrestling team has of being saved is that the team is diverse.  Most of the other sports cut are for “rich white kids,” so if they can successfully argue that wrestling helps diversity at the school I wouldn’t count out their return.

This is basically the opposite of what OP is suggesting.  Schools like Stanford don’t need sports to get people to apply to the school.  But lesser-known schools often use sports as a way of attracting students.

Edited by 1032004

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I'm getting slightly off-topic, but there's a recent article in the Atlantic: (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/11/squash-lacrosse-niche-sports-ivy-league-admissions/616474/) about parents who try to get their underqualified kids in ivy league schools in the back door via sports. Article focuses on squash and lacrosse, but the point is the ivys and their equivalents are now shutting these opportunities down and this is accelerating by things like Brown and Stanford dropping squash, tennis, lax, etc.

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6 hours ago, dougb said:

This isn't fair, for every one female that would want to Wrestle in College, there is what? 100, 500, 1000 males (I have no idea, but the ratio would be overwhelming)  Wrestling is all good it teaches Teamwork, Hard Work (Do any College Sport Teams work as hard as Wrestlers? I doubt it)  Meritocracy (You get out of it, what you put into it, and if you work hard you will improve, (Wrestling is basically who works hardest improves the most) Goal setting, etc. Wrestling  basically shows us the importance of the values we were all taught in school.

Wrestling basically gives people a chance to participate regardless of size  with some rare exceptions like too small though International has lower weights.

The more spots not available will leave many with nothing to do, which is not good, what just concentrate on Academics? Party?   EVERY COLLEGE SHOULD HAVE A WRESTLING TEAM.

There are not as many females wanting to wrestle in college as some would lead you to believe. The market for colleges looking for girls to fill up a college roster (the ladies only have 10 weights in college as well) is flooded. The small colleges adding wrestling to "save the school" is not the correct mindset. 

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30 minutes ago, Fletcher said:

I'm getting slightly off-topic, but there's a recent article in the Atlantic: (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/11/squash-lacrosse-niche-sports-ivy-league-admissions/616474/) about parents who try to get their underqualified kids in ivy league schools in the back door via sports. Article focuses on squash and lacrosse, but the point is the ivys and their equivalents are now shutting these opportunities down and this is accelerating by things like Brown and Stanford dropping squash, tennis, lax, etc.

Yup I had read that which kinda goes along with what I was saying.   Interesting article.

Wrestling is interesting because there is a lot of money in people going to clubs, etc.  But it's also popular in blue collar areas of course as well.  As we know wrestling did survive the cuts at Brown.

Edited by 1032004

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20 hours ago, CoachJSS said:

 

 

In the 20-21 season (If there's a season) NCAA Division I wrestling will have 79 schools competing. With the potential and probable losses of Stanford and Fresno St that will leave us with 77, if there are no other schools dropped, and according to some people, there will be a few more dropped.

Out of those 77, only 72 are true Division I schools. Lock Haven, Bloomsburg , Edinboro, and Clarion are D II schools while Franklin & Marshall is a D III school. All 5 schools were grandfathered into Division I.

There are 357 Division I schools and with only 72 true Division I sponsoring wrestling that's only 20% of the Division I schools. These crooked AD's use that as an excuse. Both Stanford and Fresno St alluded to that there were not a plethora of schools that offered men's wrestling and used that as a reason to cut their programs. 

So where does that leave NCAA Men's I wrestling? In a dire situation.

The potential loses of Stanford and Fresno St have (for now) have completely decimated Division I West Coast Wrestling. California is a great wrestling state with a deep talent pool and will only have 3 D I teams in the 21-22 season, and one of those teams is self funded. Where does Cal Baptist (when D I eligible) CSUB, Cal Poly, ASU, and Oregon St go for a conference? Arkansas-LR can go to the SoCon or something like that but where do these other schools go, now that the PAC 12 Conference has been gutted? 

I don't like being pessimistic because for the last few years we did see some growth with some new programs at Arkansas-LR and Presbyterian, and with 2 schools moving up from D II to D I, Cal Baptist and Bellarmine. We have seen another potential school, Western Carolina, being recommended to start a D I program. However this happens to far and few.

So in this dire situation, is there hope? I think there is.

Mike Moyer mentioned early in the pandemic that many of the mid major schools where becoming dependent on enrollment, like many of the D II, D III, & NAIA schools. Schools, like Western Carolina, who need students can attract 60 athletes by adding a men's and women's wrestling team. If D I schools decide to add men's wrestling it will probably come along with a women's team as well.

The schools that could add will be mid major schools with low enrollment. Unfortunately the power 5 schools don't need wrestling, as Stanford is making clear. Fresno St is a mid major, but the enrollment is big enough were having extra sports is not needed.

In California I can't imagine public schools needing to add wrestling. However, I can see schools in the West Coast Conference adding wrestling. This is from the 18-19 school year https://www.univstats.com/comparison/west-coast-conference/student-population/

You'll notice low male enrollment numbers for schools like St. Mary's, Univ of Pacific, Pepperdine Univ, USD, Univ of Portland etc.....8 of those schools have enrollment numbers under 10k. Here's one thing that I would think would help is capping athletic scholarship. If a conference like the West Coast Conference added wrestling, each school could cap the scholarships at 4.5 for men and 4.5 for women. That will cut down expenses. As a wrestling community we are looking opportunity. It would be nice if all schools were 9.9 but if 10 schools wanted to add wrestling and only give half of the allotted scholarships then so be it.

Anyway, it looks bad right now, and it could get worse if more schools continue to feel the pinch of the pandemic. Hopefully these mid major schools continue to need students and are looking for cost effective sports such as wrestling. My hope is that Division I wrestling can get up to 100 schools by 2025. It's a dream, but it's more fun to dream then be in despair.

 

 

 

Fresno State just came back couple years ago. If Stanford does go , that’s a big loss. But decimated west coast wrestling is not accurate in the least. You have to think the Pac 12 is in a lot of trouble without Stanford. But the Big 12 and MAC could swallow up those remaining PAC schools. 

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I actually mostly disagree that wrestling is in a dire place. I don't mean to encourage complacency or paint a super rosy picture. I don't think any Olympic sports feel particularly comfortable right now, but I think the last several months have proven that wrestling has much stronger standing than we give ourselves credit for. Every time a D1 wrestling program has been cut (and there's only been three, which is three too many), there's a fresh wave a panic through the wrestling community (including me). It's understandable; we've been traumatized over the last few decades.

But look at the number of tennis, swimming and track programs that have been cut -- and several at places where wrestling has been spared. I think this pandemic is forcing athletic departments to really investigate which sports bring real value potential and which don't (through ticket sales, through television opportunities and visibility, conference-wide and NCAA popularity, lower operating costs, tuition revenue, etc.), and by and large, it sure seems like it's been revealed that wrestling is a better bet than some of these other sports. And, though I feel guilty saying it, I think the more tennis, swimming and track programs that have been cut, the more clear the roadmap is for other schools thinking about making their own sport-elimination decisions.

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14 hours ago, Fletcher said:

I'm getting slightly off-topic, but there's a recent article in the Atlantic: (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/11/squash-lacrosse-niche-sports-ivy-league-admissions/616474/) about parents who try to get their underqualified kids in ivy league schools in the back door via sports. Article focuses on squash and lacrosse, but the point is the ivys and their equivalents are now shutting these opportunities down and this is accelerating by things like Brown and Stanford dropping squash, tennis, lax, etc.

That's what Lori Loughlin was doing with her borderline illiterate daughters. She got punished with a whole 3 month sentence to a country club prison where she'll get preferential treatment.

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I am not optimistic about the future.  How does Arizona State and Oregon State stick around if all of the western schools are dropping?  We were dropping programs before the pandemic hit.  Yes, we have the occasional smaller school like Presbyterian and Little Rock adding, but those aren’t in areas that will be a natural draw for kids.
 

The dust hasn’t settled yet on how much of a hit most of these schools will take from Covid. Also, this is a sport where the rich keep getting richer.  Outside of 4 or 5 programs, no other has a realistic chance to compete for a team title, and we don’t have TV contracts to drive revenue.  While I hope it doesn’t happen, I believe we will settle on somewhere between 40-50 programs over the next decade, mostly eastern and midwest.  

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7 hours ago, TobusRex said:

That's what Lori Loughlin was doing with her borderline illiterate daughters. She got punished with a whole 3 month sentence to a country club prison where she'll get preferential treatment.

Well that was a little different because some of those kids either never even played the sport or were not any good, and also used mainstream sports like USC football, but yeah the premise is pretty much the same.

The kids in that other article were supposedly good, the issue is that they are competing for such a small # of spots, and even less now with teams being cut.

Howver, I didn’t realize Stanford Sailing (2 of the 11 cut sports) was involved with the Lori Laughlin/Operation Varsity Blues thing, so I do wonder if that had any impact (the coach was fired and charged).  Apparently a Chinese family paid $6.5 million (of which the head scammer guy took $6, and the father who was a pharma guy had previously been accused of bribing someone at China’s FDA who was sentenced to death...) but the girl wasn’t even listed as an athletic recruit, yet supposedly her sailing accomplishments helped her get admitted.   And apparently they attempted to get other Stanford coaches involved in the scheme but were unsuccessful - https://abcnews.go.com/US/varsity-blues-ringleader-recruit-stanford-coaches-investigation/story?id=67489718

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The unspoken component to all of this (particularly this season) is testing. The Patriot League for example would require athletes to be tested 3 times a week. That adds up to alot of dollars and cents for sports that essentially make nothing in return. 

This is assuming that schools have the expendable income to provide that testing. I'd imagine many teams are looking at steep roster cuts or not paying for testing all together for certain sports.

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On 10/23/2020 at 1:43 PM, BlueWolverine said:

I actually mostly disagree that wrestling is in a dire place. I don't mean to encourage complacency or paint a super rosy picture. I don't think any Olympic sports feel particularly comfortable right now, but I think the last several months have proven that wrestling has much stronger standing than we give ourselves credit for. Every time a D1 wrestling program has been cut (and there's only been three, which is three too many), there's a fresh wave a panic through the wrestling community (including me). It's understandable; we've been traumatized over the last few decades.

But look at the number of tennis, swimming and track programs that have been cut -- and several at places where wrestling has been spared. I think this pandemic is forcing athletic departments to really investigate which sports bring real value potential and which don't (through ticket sales, through television opportunities and visibility, conference-wide and NCAA popularity, lower operating costs, tuition revenue, etc.), and by and large, it sure seems like it's been revealed that wrestling is a better bet than some of these other sports. And, though I feel guilty saying it, I think the more tennis, swimming and track programs that have been cut, the more clear the roadmap is for other schools thinking about making their own sport-elimination decisions.

I think the biggest danger to D1 wrestling will be administrators questioning what the point of spending lots of money on any "minor" sports. What are they really adding to the student body as a whole?

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