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I did 65, might as well do 74. Nobody at this weight can afford to look past a single match. These guys are good.

1. Burroughs - It would have been better if this happened last year, but he's still formidable if not quite as great as he once was. Recovery off the scale will be key, per his own words.
2. Dake - I doubt any American has looked better over the past 2 1/2 years. It's been awhile since he made 74 flat. We are all expecting a classic matchup with Burroughs on Saturday.
3. Nolf - He looks more like a full-sized 74 than ever before and acquitted himself fairly well against Dake, even if he didn't put Dake in too much trouble. Big upset if he gets to Burroughs, but not completely insane.
4. Marsteller - Looked great last weekend. Will making weight and competing two weeks in a row take any kind of toll? His positioning and control ties are very good and hard for anyone to deal with.
5. Gantt - Does not seem fun to wrestle. You might win, but it will be a fight for six entire minutes.
6. Massa - Has some good freestyle results, though his NCAA performance was a bit lackluster. He sometimes seems disinterested out on the mat. His style may be better fit to this tournament.
7. Carr - First round matchup with Massa who wrestled two weights above him in St. Louis. Has the junior world gold, which often bodes well. If he gets by Massa, the Nolf match will be a lot of fun to watch.
8. Wick - Hard to train for his body type. Up and down results, but he has competed a lot and beat Mekhi Lewis at RTC Cup
9. Joseph - Looked a little small against Dake and seemed rusty. Looked better last week. Now he's got a rematch with Marsteller who blanked him in the finals. 

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I have picked Burroughs to make every world and Olympic team since 2011.  But this year seems different, and it's 100% due to his age. 

If he loses, it could be the end of a historic career.  If he wins, it would be a phenomenal accomplishment. 

Edited by Katie

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1 hour ago, IronChef said:

I did 65, might as well do 74. Nobody at this weight can afford to look past a single match. These guys are good.

1. Burroughs - It would have been better if this happened last year, but he's still formidable if not quite as great as he once was. Recovery off the scale will be key, per his own words.
2. Dake - I doubt any American has looked better over the past 2 1/2 years. It's been awhile since he made 74 flat. We are all expecting a classic matchup with Burroughs on Saturday.
3. Nolf - He looks more like a full-sized 74 than ever before and acquitted himself fairly well against Dake, even if he didn't put Dake in too much trouble. Big upset if he gets to Burroughs, but not completely insane.
4. Marsteller - Looked great last weekend. Will making weight and competing two weeks in a row take any kind of toll? His positioning and control ties are very good and hard for anyone to deal with.
5. Gantt - Does not seem fun to wrestle. You might win, but it will be a fight for six entire minutes.
6. Massa - Has some good freestyle results, though his NCAA performance was a bit lackluster. He sometimes seems disinterested out on the mat. His style may be better fit to this tournament.
7. Carr - First round matchup with Massa who wrestled two weights above him in St. Louis. Has the junior world gold, which often bodes well. If he gets by Massa, the Nolf match will be a lot of fun to watch.
8. Wick - Hard to train for his body type. Up and down results, but he has competed a lot and beat Mekhi Lewis at RTC Cup
9. Joseph - Looked a little small against Dake and seemed rusty. Looked better last week. Now he's got a rematch with Marsteller who blanked him in the finals. 

Thanks for your analysis - agree Joseph far better than in recent events.  Will be interesting to see his adjustments for Marsteller, who also looked sharp.   Will youth be served and if so - by whom and when?  Is Nolf big and strong enough to challenge the old guard and same question for Carr and Joseph?   

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1 hour ago, IronChef said:

Burroughs 7/8/1988
Dake 2/25/1991

2 years, 7 months, 13 days different 

Dake has had more serious injuries than JB, so I'm calling this even.  Throw in that Dake can't take a punch and physical advantage becomes Jordan Ernest Burroughs.

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Dake is pretty old for world-class wrestling, too.  As for some sort of age advantage between the JB and Dake, I’m not going to get into that.  

Edited by Katie

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2.5 years is a lot of time in wrestling. 

JB's style is more reliant on explosion and cardio (specifically, more offensive attempts per match, especially in the second period), both of which decline pretty quickly after your mid-20s. The age gap may not be enormous, but JB's is more vulnerable to the effects of aging than Dake.

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1 hour ago, wrestlingnerd said:

2.5 years is a lot of time in wrestling. 

JB's style is more reliant on explosion and cardio (specifically, more offensive attempts per match, especially in the second period), both of which decline pretty quickly after your mid-20s. The age gap may not be enormous, but JB's is more vulnerable to the effects of aging than Dake.

Dake is not vulnerable to aging.  He is doing functional patterns and getting younger and younger by the day. 

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27 minutes ago, ShakaAloha said:

Dake is not vulnerable to aging.  He is doing functional patterns and getting younger and younger by the day. 

He has reset his natural bio-immunity by rolling around naked in the dirt. Pairing that with his *ahem* very talented looking chiropractor and he has basically become immortal.

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20 hours ago, wrestlingnerd said:

2.5 years is a lot of time in wrestling. 

JB's style is more reliant on explosion and cardio (specifically, more offensive attempts per match, especially in the second period), both of which decline pretty quickly after your mid-20s. The age gap may not be enormous, but JB's is more vulnerable to the effects of aging than Dake.

In becoming the first person to cover the marathon distance in less than two hours, Kipchoge, 34, achieved a sports milestone granted almost mythical status in the running world, breaking ...

 So I don’t think cardio endurance “declines pretty quickly after your mid 20s.”. 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Maximus Meridius said:

In becoming the first person to cover the marathon distance in less than two hours, Kipchoge, 34, achieved a sports milestone granted almost mythical status in the running world, breaking ...

 So I don’t think cardio endurance “declines pretty quickly after your mid 20s.”. 

A genetic anomaly does not make a rule. Also, "cardio" can mean a lot of things but running a marathon and wrestling are about as far apart as you can get within the wide spectrum of activities that can be called "cardio."

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4 minutes ago, wrestlingnerd said:

A genetic anomaly does not make a rule. Also, "cardio" can mean a lot of things but running a marathon and wrestling are about as far apart as you can get within the wide spectrum of activities that can be called "cardio."

Depending on how the match goes, you'd be surprised.  In cycling there are track events ("sprints") that require high power for tens of seconds, and there are Grand Tour stages and one-day classics that require power over many hours.  In between, there is the pursuit which lasts around four minutes.  Guess which type of athlete completely dominates the pursuit?  Hint:  they are skinny dudes.

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2 minutes ago, klehner said:

Depending on how the match goes, you'd be surprised.  In cycling there are track events ("sprints") that require high power for tens of seconds, and there are Grand Tour stages and one-day classics that require power over many hours.  In between, there is the pursuit which lasts around four minutes.  Guess which type of athlete completely dominates the pursuit?  Hint:  they are skinny dudes.

OK, how about this. The physical conditioning required to succeed in wrestling at the highest levels declines quickly into your 30s. Is that less controversial? Jeez....

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2 hours ago, wrestlingnerd said:

A genetic anomaly does not make a rule. Also, "cardio" can mean a lot of things but running a marathon and wrestling are about as far apart as you can get within the wide spectrum of activities that can be called "cardio."

 

 I hate to introduce facts into the discussion, but endurance athletes excel well into their 30s.  

Jan Frodeno (born 18 August 1981) is a German triathlete. He is the gold medal winner in men's triathlon at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, 3-time winner of the Ironman World Championship in 2015, 2016, and 2019, and 2-time winner of the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in 2015 and 2018. He is the world record holder for the long distance, set in Roth, Germany in 2016 with 7:35:39 hours.

 So he was 38 when he last won the Ironman world championship.

 And cardio does not mean a lot of things. Your cardiovascular fitness involves how much endurance you have when doing exercise.

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22 minutes ago, Maximus Meridius said:

 

 I hate to introduce facts into the discussion, but endurance athletes excel well into their 30s.  

Jan Frodeno (born 18 August 1981) is a German triathlete. He is the gold medal winner in men's triathlon at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, 3-time winner of the Ironman World Championship in 2015, 2016, and 2019, and 2-time winner of the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in 2015 and 2018. He is the world record holder for the long distance, set in Roth, Germany in 2016 with 7:35:39 hours.

 So he was 38 when he last won the Ironman world championship.

 And cardio does not mean a lot of things. Your cardiovascular fitness involves how much endurance you have when doing exercise.

"Cardio" does not mean a lot of things, true, but it does not mean one specific thing with regard to athletic performance either. How much "endurance" you have is absolutely a factor of the type of sport you play. Are you saying that the "cardio" (however you interpret it) required to win marathons is literally the same athletic trait(s) required to succeed in wrestling? What a joke.

And if you want to introduce facts into a discussion, the worst thing you could do is throw up another single data point, as if that meant anything. Here's real data that is actually usable for the type of analysis you purported to do in your post above but miserably failed. One data point or even just a handful do NOT make a fact....

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Age-y-at-Peak-Performance-and-Number-of-Years-in-the-Peak-Performance-Window-in_tbl1_283517440

NOTE: For middle distance running, infinitely closer to the fitness you need for wrestling than a triathlon (laughable, really), age at peak performance was found to be 24.9 on average and the window for peak performance in those sports was 5.5 years. Have a look for yourself you want to throw around words like "facts".

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3 hours ago, wrestlingnerd said:

A genetic anomaly does not make a rule. Also, "cardio" can mean a lot of things but running a marathon and wrestling are about as far apart as you can get within the wide spectrum of activities that can be called "cardio."

I would call JB a "genetic anomaly".

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17 hours ago, Maximus Meridius said:

In becoming the first person to cover the marathon distance in less than two hours, Kipchoge, 34, achieved a sports milestone granted almost mythical status in the running world, breaking ...

 So I don’t think cardio endurance “declines pretty quickly after your mid 20s.”. 

 

 

 

 

I think the OP might be referring to anaerobic (power) endurance rather than aerobic endurance, e.g. marathon stuff..

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