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Today is the day

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2 hours ago, Bronco said:

Today is the day that the supporters of Stanford wrestling will be meeting with the Stanford school President.   Anxious to hear any updates or news on this.

Same here.  Hoping that david has the perfect stone for goliath.

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4 minutes ago, nhs67 said:

Pointless.  Their coach is already gone.

There are in fact more capable people in the world of wrestling other than Jason Borelli, though he was fantastic. Kerry McCoy was the RTC coach was he not? 

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1 minute ago, Drew87 said:

There are in fact more capable people in the world of wrestling other than Jason Borelli, though he was fantastic. Kerry McCoy was the RTC coach was he not? 

Stanford already cut the program. You think they are interested in spending time and money vetting coaches to bring it back? I’m not trying to be a butthole because it really sucks, but that’s the reality of what’s happening right now. 

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35 minutes ago, goheels1812 said:

Stanford already cut the program. You think they are interested in spending time and money vetting coaches to bring it back? I’m not trying to be a butthole because it really sucks, but that’s the reality of what’s happening right now. 

As I’ve had said to me multiple times, unless you’re in the room, you can’t claim to know exactly what’s going on.

That being said, if you feel like being a grouch, go right ahead, but that’s just poopooing for poopooing’s sake. 

 

image.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, Drew87 said:

As I’ve had said to me multiple times, unless you’re in the room, you can’t claim to know exactly what’s going on.

That being said, if you feel like being a grouch, go right ahead, but that’s just poopooing for poopooing’s sake. 

 

image.jpeg

Lol. I can see how it comes off that way. I’ve stated in so many threads I hope Stanford brings back wrestling just as bad as everyone else. But sometimes you just have to be realistic and look at the direction things are going. Also, not being in the room goes both ways. There is wayyyyyyy more anecdotal evidence that Stanford is not interested in having wrestling around than that they are interested in bringing it back. 
 

Edited to say: If I end up being wrong and Stanford wrestling is saved, I’ll come back here and let you poopoo all over me and laugh in my face. I hope that’s the case!!

Edited by goheels1812

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13 minutes ago, goheels1812 said:

Lol. I can see how it comes off that way. I’ve stated in so many threads I hope Stanford brings back wrestling just as bad as everyone else. But sometimes you just have to be realistic and look at the direction things are going. Also, not being in the room goes both ways. There is wayyyyyyy more anecdotal evidence that Stanford is not interested in having wrestling around than that they are interested in bringing it back. 
 

Edited to say: If I end up being wrong and Stanford wrestling is saved, I’ll come back here and let you poopoo all over me and laugh in my face. I hope that’s the case!!

Yeah, I know it’s a real small chance, really just hoping while I still can since the death knell has yet to ring.

I think shared rooms and growing women’s freestyle at the college level around the country is going to be paramount to protecting wrestling programs around the country for as long as national legislation governing universities remains gender-obsessed.  

Incorporating women’s wrestling with mens in a single roster, with the same coaches, etc, would go a loooong way to protecting many programs around the country. It’s both good for the sport and good for deflecting Title IX excuses.

Edited by Drew87

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Jason Borrelli exceeded every reasonable expectation of class, professionalism, effort, and leadership in the fight to save Stanford wrestling.  His demeanor throughout the struggle was truly remarkable.

At the end of the day, no amount of money, competitive excellence, or direction from the coaching staff was going to save the program.

Stanford doesn't want wrestling.  Part of us has to become ok with that.  It is exhausting trying to keep institutions that really don't want the sport on a fundamental level to keep the train rolling against their will.

Even if the 12 million dollars was the tipping point for reinstatement, I would love to see those funds directed to institutions (using a broad definition of institution here) that revel in our successes as a sport and truly want wrestling to thrive.  Maybe a few of those bucks can follow Jason to DC to support the local chapters of beat the streets or USA wrestling, or higher up the ladder to support the American University program.

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Below is an update from the article after the meeting. I wonder how long it will take for him to "consider" the proposal? Long enough for everyone to leave and then have a different excuse as to why Stanford should not have a wrestling program? At leas the people directly involved have hope.... but as an outsider with coaches leaving and all your best kids in the portal it doesn't seem promising. At this point you have to think the kids are saying forget it - I can't wait - I have to get on scholarship somewhere else as soon as possible. 

From the updated article: 

Stanford president Marc Tessier-Lavigne promised a group of alumni on Tuesday that he would consider its proposal to save 11 sports from being eliminated at the end of the current school year. Jeremy Jacobs of the lobbying group 36 Sports Strong said alumni were encouraged after an hour-long meeting with school administrators and Stanford board of trustees members, including outgoing chairman Jeffrey Raikes. 

“We believe President Tessier-Lavigne and the board’s athletics subcommittee are trying to lead an earnest effort to review the decision,” Jacobs said. However, Jacobs, a former men’s volleyball player, also said the group told school officials it would continue its lobbying efforts: “We were very clear we’re not going to let up what we’re doing,” he said.

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10 hours ago, JHRoseWrestling said:

Jason Borrelli exceeded every reasonable expectation of class, professionalism, effort, and leadership in the fight to save Stanford wrestling.  His demeanor throughout the struggle was truly remarkable.

At the end of the day, no amount of money, competitive excellence, or direction from the coaching staff was going to save the program.

Stanford doesn't want wrestling.  Part of us has to become ok with that.  It is exhausting trying to keep institutions that really don't want the sport on a fundamental level to keep the train rolling against their will.

Even if the 12 million dollars was the tipping point for reinstatement, I would love to see those funds directed to institutions (using a broad definition of institution here) that revel in our successes as a sport and truly want wrestling to thrive.  Maybe a few of those bucks can follow Jason to DC to support the local chapters of beat the streets or USA wrestling, or higher up the ladder to support the American University program.

So where would you take the fight other than where it is brought to you? It has been made pretty clear that more institutions want wrestling gone than are signing up to add it.  Why if you care about the sport would you just throw your hands up in the air and quit?

Practically speaking it makes little sense for Stanford to do, as most elite academic institutions have wrestling.  All the ivies except yale have it, Duke has it, UChicago has it, and MIT dropped their D3 program in the past ten years.

Philosophically, that is the most un-wrestling stance you could take, both in terms of advocating for the sport and in terms of mindset. 

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From an article in the Mercury News newspaper - released yesterday at 6 p.m.

Stanford president Marc Tessier-Lavigne promised a group of alumni on Tuesday that he would consider its proposal to save 11 sports from being eliminated at the end of the current school year.

Jeremy Jacobs of the lobbying group 36 Sports Strong said alumni were encouraged after an hour-long meeting with school administrators and Stanford board of trustees members, including outgoing chairman Jeffrey Raikes.

"We believe President Tessier-Lavigne and the board’s athletics subcommittee are trying to lead an earnest effort to review the decision,” Jacobs said.

However, Jacobs, a former men’s volleyball player, also said the group told school officials it would continue its lobbying efforts: “We were very clear we’re not going to let up what we’re doing,” he said.

A July community letter announcing the cuts led to a backlash in which some of the school’s prominent former athletes signed a petition calling for the reinstatement of the programs. So far, the group said it has more than 4,000 signatures.

The group also said more than 1,500 emails have been sent to Stanford leaders expressing outrage and that 200 alums have joined a boycott to withhold donations.

Citing budget shortfalls because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Stanford officials announced they would cut men’s and women’s fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men’s rowing, co-ed and women’s sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men’s volleyball and wrestling.

A July 8 letter to the Stanford community said the athletic department faced a projected $25 million deficit in the fiscal year 2021. School officials said they forecast a shortfall of almost $70 million over the next three years.

The “36” in the lobbying group’s name represents the number of sports Stanford has been fielding. The school has more than double the national average of sports programs.

Some of the famous alumni supporting the group are Andrew Luck, Keri Walsh Jennings and Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J).

Other prestigious athletics who have signed the petition are Jennifer Azzi (basketball), Tony Azevedo (water polo), Bob and Mike Bryan (tennis), Julie Foudy (soccer), Jessica Mendoza (softball), Mike Messina (baseball), Jordan Morris (soccer), Summer Sanders (swimming), Keri Strug (gymnastics) and professional golfer Michelle Wie, a Stanford graduate.

Jacobs, who attended the video meeting Tuesday, said the group proposed a partnership centered on a way to self-endow the sports programs in exchange for immediately reinstating all of the teams.

He said Tessier-Lavigne and the board members agreed to present the idea to the full board at an upcoming special meeting.

Jacobs said six athletes represented alumni, including former star basketball player Adam Keefe and current Olympic fencer Alexander Massialas.

Provost Persis Drell, vice president for development Jon Denney and athletic director Bernard Muir also participated in the meeting, he said.

“As the president said last week, the purpose of the meeting was to ensure” the lobby group’s perspectives were heard,” a university spokesman said in an email. “To that end, he feels the group had a substantive and very informative exchange.”

Jacobs said the alumni told administrators and board members that in the year since the start of the pandemic “the school is returning to normal operations with its endowment thriving.” Because of the change in the outlook “there are better options that should be considered.”

Jacobs said the alumni group outlined how cutting the relatively low-cost 11 sports would not solve the athletic department’s financial troubles. Stanford does not make as much as many other Power Five schools based on attendance for football and men’s basketball. As a private university, its budgets are not publicly available.

 

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33 minutes ago, Bronco said:

From an article in the Mercury News newspaper - released yesterday at 6 p.m.

Stanford president Marc Tessier-Lavigne promised a group of alumni on Tuesday that he would consider its proposal to save 11 sports from being eliminated at the end of the current school year.

Jeremy Jacobs of the lobbying group 36 Sports Strong said alumni were encouraged after an hour-long meeting with school administrators and Stanford board of trustees members, including outgoing chairman Jeffrey Raikes.

"We believe President Tessier-Lavigne and the board’s athletics subcommittee are trying to lead an earnest effort to review the decision,” Jacobs said.

However, Jacobs, a former men’s volleyball player, also said the group told school officials it would continue its lobbying efforts: “We were very clear we’re not going to let up what we’re doing,” he said.

A July community letter announcing the cuts led to a backlash in which some of the school’s prominent former athletes signed a petition calling for the reinstatement of the programs. So far, the group said it has more than 4,000 signatures.

The group also said more than 1,500 emails have been sent to Stanford leaders expressing outrage and that 200 alums have joined a boycott to withhold donations.

Citing budget shortfalls because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Stanford officials announced they would cut men’s and women’s fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men’s rowing, co-ed and women’s sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men’s volleyball and wrestling.

A July 8 letter to the Stanford community said the athletic department faced a projected $25 million deficit in the fiscal year 2021. School officials said they forecast a shortfall of almost $70 million over the next three years.

The “36” in the lobbying group’s name represents the number of sports Stanford has been fielding. The school has more than double the national average of sports programs.

Some of the famous alumni supporting the group are Andrew Luck, Keri Walsh Jennings and Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J).

Other prestigious athletics who have signed the petition are Jennifer Azzi (basketball), Tony Azevedo (water polo), Bob and Mike Bryan (tennis), Julie Foudy (soccer), Jessica Mendoza (softball), Mike Messina (baseball), Jordan Morris (soccer), Summer Sanders (swimming), Keri Strug (gymnastics) and professional golfer Michelle Wie, a Stanford graduate.

Jacobs, who attended the video meeting Tuesday, said the group proposed a partnership centered on a way to self-endow the sports programs in exchange for immediately reinstating all of the teams.

He said Tessier-Lavigne and the board members agreed to present the idea to the full board at an upcoming special meeting.

Jacobs said six athletes represented alumni, including former star basketball player Adam Keefe and current Olympic fencer Alexander Massialas.

Provost Persis Drell, vice president for development Jon Denney and athletic director Bernard Muir also participated in the meeting, he said.

“As the president said last week, the purpose of the meeting was to ensure” the lobby group’s perspectives were heard,” a university spokesman said in an email. “To that end, he feels the group had a substantive and very informative exchange.”

Jacobs said the alumni told administrators and board members that in the year since the start of the pandemic “the school is returning to normal operations with its endowment thriving.” Because of the change in the outlook “there are better options that should be considered.”

Jacobs said the alumni group outlined how cutting the relatively low-cost 11 sports would not solve the athletic department’s financial troubles. Stanford does not make as much as many other Power Five schools based on attendance for football and men’s basketball. As a private university, its budgets are not publicly available.

I remember this quote from somewhere....almost like it was posted yesterday by someone. 

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11 hours ago, Drew87 said:

Practically speaking it makes little sense for Stanford to do, as most elite academic institutions have wrestling.  All the ivies except yale have it, Duke has it, UChicago has it, and MIT dropped their D3 program in the past ten years.

Dartmouth doesn’t have it either but your point still holds. 

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12 hours ago, Drew87 said:

So where would you take the fight other than where it is brought to you? It has been made pretty clear that more institutions want wrestling gone than are signing up to add it.  Why if you care about the sport would you just throw your hands up in the air and quit?

Practically speaking it makes little sense for Stanford to do, as most elite academic institutions have wrestling.  All the ivies except yale have it, Duke has it, UChicago has it, and MIT dropped their D3 program in the past ten years.

Philosophically, that is the most un-wrestling stance you could take, both in terms of advocating for the sport and in terms of mindset. 

Man I would prefer to have this debate in person.  You seem like a pretty smart guy and this is a complex conversation.

I bet you've coached or been on a wrestling team.  Let's roleplay.  Stanford is the kid on the team who hates wrestling.  He has some skills, but he tries to quit every day.  He drags down the practice room and just keeping him engaged is so exhausting on the head coach that the passionate members of the team are neglected.  This has gone past teaching the young man to overcome adversity, he is really here against his will.  13 starters with a love for wrestling aren't developed to their full potential because all the energy is being drained to squeeze a few team points out of this kid.  At the end of the season, he quits anyway.  Here's the thing, he's not a crappy kid, he just wanted to play violin all day long.  He loves violin like we love wrestling.  Let him play violin.

I don't know what Stanford loves, whether it's money, football, academics, or those precious 240 seats in the class formerly allocated toward athletes.  I do know it's not wrestling.

 

You asked where we should take up the fight, well I offered developmental programs or getting behind the revitalization of the AU program for starters.  I am also reminded of when UN-O dropped a first class program and a first class coach, and Maryville said that sounds like something we would like to have at our place.

You seem creative, why don't you throw out some candidates for those 12 million dollars and yours and my combined 2000 words of discussion on the virtues of wrestling more worthy than Stanford has proven to be. 

Edited by JHRoseWrestling
Typo

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4 hours ago, wrestlingnerd said:

Dartmouth doesn’t have it either but your point still holds. 

I knew I was missing one, appreciate plugging the holes in the argument ship.

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3 hours ago, JHRoseWrestling said:

Man I would prefer to have this debate in person.  You seem like a pretty smart guy and this is a complex conversation.

I bet you've coached or been on a wrestling team.  Let's roleplay.  Stanford is the kid on the team who hates wrestling.  He has some skills, but he tries to quit every day.  He drags down the practice room and just keeping him engaged is so exhausting on the head coach that the passionate members of the team are neglected.  This has gone past teaching the young man to overcome adversity, he is really here against his will.  13 starters with a love for wrestling aren't developed to their full potential because all the energy is being drained to squeeze a few team points out of this kid.  At the end of the season, he quits anyway.  Here's the thing, he's not a crappy kid, he just wanted to play violin all day long.  He loves violin like we love wrestling.  Let him play violin.

I don't know what Stanford loves, whether it's money, football, academics, or those precious 240 seats in the class formerly allocated toward athletes.  I do know it's not wrestling.

 

You asked where we should take up the fight, well I offered developmental programs or getting behind the revitalization of the AU program for starters.  I am also reminded of when UN-O dropped a first class program and a first class coach, and Maryville said that sounds like something we would like to have at our place.

You seem creative, why don't you throw out some candidates for those 12 million dollars and yours and my combined 2000 words of discussion on the virtues of wrestling more worthy than Stanford has proven to be. 

Agreed this would be a great in person conversation.  And I do see and understand your points, if a program is so undesired that it itself becomes deleterious to the fabric if the sport, time to move on and grow the positive rather than bailing a sinking ship.

 A part of my fervor on the subject comes from my impression that this move is spearheaded by a duplicitous AD playing a particularly political hand, leveraging current events to improve the optics of his own career trajectory in order to gain larger and higher office, maybe UC system chancellorship or something of the like.  It just feels like a hatchet job, like Boise State but worse.

Besides incorporating women’s freestyle, I believe wrestling would benefit a great deal from working the AD market. Pro-wrestling AD’s are a valuable breakwater against rogue University CFO’s who just want to cut stuff to make their Presidents happy.

In terms of just hashing out the best course if action in these cases, I believe rather strongly in keeping these conversations going as much as possible for as long as possible. I am a huge wrestling fan personally, but I also want every eager kid around the country to have access to the opportunities wrestling provides. Wrestling was a very big part of a good portion of my life from elementary school through college, and gave me a ton of opportunities that I may not have had access to otherwise.  While I had to cut the weight and wrestle etc, there were always coaches, organizers etc, finding, pointing to and holding the doors open for me.  Like so many things, I appreciate it more the further I get from it. 50% of me believes it is imperative to pay it forward for the current generation, and the other 50% just loves wrestling and is glued to my computer or TV every March and wants to see a bigger field every year.

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3 hours ago, JHRoseWrestling said:

Man I would prefer to have this debate in person.  You seem like a pretty smart guy and this is a complex conversation.

I bet you've coached or been on a wrestling team.  Let's roleplay.  Stanford is the kid on the team who hates wrestling.  He has some skills, but he tries to quit every day.  He drags down the practice room and just keeping him engaged is so exhausting on the head coach that the passionate members of the team are neglected.  This has gone past teaching the young man to overcome adversity, he is really here against his will.  13 starters with a love for wrestling aren't developed to their full potential because all the energy is being drained to squeeze a few team points out of this kid.  At the end of the season, he quits anyway.  Here's the thing, he's not a crappy kid, he just wanted to play violin all day long.  He loves violin like we love wrestling.  Let him play violin.

I don't know what Stanford loves, whether it's money, football, academics, or those precious 240 seats in the class formerly allocated toward athletes.  I do know it's not wrestling.

 

You asked where we should take up the fight, well I offered developmental programs or getting behind the revitalization of the AU program for starters.  I am also reminded of when UN-O dropped a first class program and a first class coach, and Maryville said that sounds like something we would like to have at our place.

You seem creative, why don't you throw out some candidates for those 12 million dollars and yours and my combined 2000 words of discussion on the virtues of wrestling more worthy than Stanford has proven to be. 

Nobody is going to give 12 million dollars to bring back wrestling at a different college.  There is an order of magnitude more value in having wrestling at elite universities than enrollment driven colleges or small universities (the latter is where we currently see the growth of the sport). And by elite, I don't just mean Stanford/Harvard.  If you look at the academic program offered at D1 universities like Stanford, Oregon, Notre Dame, Boston University, etc, it is clearly separated from most D2 or NAIA programs that often utilize athletics as a means to drive enrollment. Wrestlers getting scholarships to attend these universities is a huge value for the sport, and saving wrestling at Stanford would be incredible (and the loss of the other programs was awful).  I'm skeptical about whether it is feasible, since I assumed Stanford wanted fewer athlete admission spots, but it's great that the Uni president appears open to it.  

Edited by Billyhoyle

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