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Jimmy Cinnabon

Would have been champ if at the right weight

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1 hour ago, dmm53 said:

This Austin Powers quote reminds me of a short story I once cobbled together from the first words (opening lines) of roughly 35 famous novels (below).   In the age of Twitter and short attention spans, I thought it necessary at the time.   I imagine the fictional character of the narrative could win the now obsolete weight category of "Unlimited" in the college ranks.  He would pin Chris Taylor in the finals with a Soufflé before leaving his shoes on the mat for eternity.

Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road and this moocow that was coming down along the road met a nicens little boy named baby . . .  (James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man)

If you really want to hear about it the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.       (J. D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye)

Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.   (Charles Dickens, David Copperfield)

All children, except one, grow up.   (J. M. Barrie, Peter Pan)

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.        (Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina)

My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip.     (Charles Dickens, Great Expectations)

In the town, there were two mutes and they were always together.   (Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter)

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.  (Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities)

For a long time, I went to bed early.     (Marcel Proust, Swann’s Way)

As awoke from a night of uneasy dreaming, found myself transformed in [my] bed into a gigantic insect.    (Franz Kafka, Metamorphosis)

I am a sick man. I am a spiteful man. I am an unpleasant man. I think my liver hurts.     (Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground)

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.   (George Orwell, 1984)

A screaming comes across the sky.    (Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow)

It was love at first sight.     (Joseph Heller, Catch-22)

Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.  (Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita)

[She] had that kind of beauty which seems to be thrown into relief by poor dress.  (George Eliot, Middlemarch)

Most really pretty girls have pretty ugly feet.   (David Foster Wallace, The Broom of the System)

Kidnapping children is never a good idea; all the same, sometimes it has to be done.   (Eva Ibbotson, Island of Aunts)

It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded [me] of the fate of unrequited love.   (Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera)

Of all the things that drive men to sea, the most common disaster, I’ve come to learn, is women.     (Charles Johnson, Middle Passage)

[But] it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.    (Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice)

In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had”  (F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby)

was to be found among the fops and fools of the coffee-houses one rangy, gangling flitch … more ambitious than talented, and yet more talented than prudent, who, like my friends-in-folly, all of whom were supposed to be educating at Oxford or Cambridge, had found the sound of Mother English more fun to game with than her sense to labor over, and so rather than applying [myself] to the pains of scholarship, [have] learned the knack of versifying, and ground out quires of couplets after the fashion of the day, afroth with Joves and Jupiters, aclang with jarring rhymes, and sting-taut with similes stretched to the snapping point. (John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor)

And when a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere.    (John Wyndham, The Day of the Triffids)

The sun rose slowly, as if it wasn’t sure it was worth the effort.   (Terry Pratchett, The Light Fantastic)

There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.  (Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre)

The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new.  (Samuel Beckett, Murphy)

Midway on life’s journey, I found myself in dark woods, the right road lost. (Dante, The Divine Comedy, The Inferno)

Someone must have slandered [me]., for one morning, without having done anything truly wrong, was arrested.   (Franz Kafka, The Trial)

Granted: I am an inmate of a mental hospital; my keeper is watching me, he never lets me out of his sight; there’s a peephole in the door, and my keeper’s eye is the shade of brown that can never see through a blue-eyed type like me.    (Gunter Grass, The Tin Drum)

Many years later, as I faced the firing squad, I was to remember that distant afternoon when my father took me to discover ice. (Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude)

Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang! Four shots ripped into my groin and I was off on the greatest adventure of my life!    (Max Shulman, Sleep Till Noon)

This is the saddest story I have ever heard.    (Ford Maddox Ford, The Good Soldier)

[But] a story has no beginning or end; arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead.  (Graham Greene, The End of the Affair)

All this happened, more or less.     (Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse Five)

 

 

Witness Post: Heavyweights | Henry E. Hooperimage.jpeg.63f2f5b0531bc0943f0debc54870d00c.jpeg

Great post! But also spoiled several of my upcoming posts!

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6 hours ago, Fletcher said:

Too lazy to look it up, but I recall Poeta had to wrestle up a weight his first two years of college. He still made AA up a weight so I imagine he would have done some damage at his proper weight.

just his freshman year. finished r12 at 165. went 3, 2, 2 the rest of the way at 157

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4 minutes ago, Lunaticfringe said:

Jordan Leen was a 8 seed when he won it. 157 was more a crap shoot in the 2005-2008 time frame where anyone could win of the top 10

My point is he beat Poeta…also in that bracket, National champ Gregor Gillespie, Dan Vallimont, Ryan Morningstar and Poeta himself.  Though I’ll grant you the weight class crumbled from what people thought, but I wouldn’t call it a crapshoot

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42 minutes ago, Schuteandscore said:

I am trying to remember what you’re referring to, been a long time since I have seen that match

Ref calls Poeta for fleeing the mat but doesn't call him out-of-bounds (obvious error that even the announcers flag). Without that call, Poeta would be down by 1 instead of 2 in the last minute and would wrestle that last minute very differently.

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8 minutes ago, Fletcher said:

Ref calls Poeta for fleeing the mat but doesn't call him out-of-bounds (obvious error that even the announcers flag). Without that call, Poeta would be down by 1 instead of 2 in the last minute and would wrestle that last minute very differently.

I kind of remember now, and good point…but also, he was down by 1.  Maybe wrestles differently, but that’s wrestling, he lost.  

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25 minutes ago, Fletcher said:

Ref calls Poeta for fleeing the mat but doesn't call him out-of-bounds (obvious error that even the announcers flag). Without that call, Poeta would be down by 1 instead of 2 in the last minute and would wrestle that last minute very differently.

Maybe not- I have a 2011-2013 book and worded the same-

Art. 9. Stalling by Fleeing. Fleeing or attempting to flee the wrestling area as a means of avoiding being scored upon.

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16 hours ago, Fletcher said:

Too lazy to look it up, but I recall Poeta had to wrestle up a weight his first two years of college. He still made AA up a weight so I imagine he would have done some damage at his proper weight.

He was behind Tirapelle that year and I think he was the #1 both years he didn't AA. Illinois used to be real tough during the Johnson era when Poeta was competing. Like clockwork 5-7 AAs and a finalist annually. Here is to hoping that Poeta can instill that winning attitude and get back to a top-15 program.

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2 hours ago, Fletcher said:

Poeta gets the TD (for the tie), then cuts him to go for another TD. Doubt he cuts him if the TD puts him up by 1.

You really think he'd cut him--putting himself behind-- rather than try to go to OT.

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