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Wrestleknownothing

It looks like there is an Olympic gold in my future too

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Gable Steveson does not max out when weight lifting.

https://www.insider.com/gold-medalist-wrestler-uses-lighter-weights-doesnt-max-out-2021-12

It doesn't say that he stops at 12 ounce curls, but I am seeing if that works for me.

And who do we think he is talking about here?:

"There's really no point besides telling your friends that you lifted a certain amount," Stevenson told Insider. "Stuff like that is pointless and it could injure you."

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Didn't get the feeling he was talking about anyone in particular, but totally agree with his philosophy.  I don't think I "maxed out" once after HS.  And its never been a part of regimen for my athletes.  For wrestling in particular, its just simply not functional.

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2 minutes ago, 1032004 said:

lol I think a tshirt with “665 lb deadlift” on it disagrees with this statement 

It could, I just don't think Ferrari plays a whole lot on Steveson's mind.  Could be wrong but....who knows.  Seems like a nothing to see here moment where we are trying to make something out of nothing.  

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This makes so much sense to me. You can still build muscle by endurance lifting. I used to max out when I competed, but as an older person, my #1 goal is to not get injured. In retrospect, avoiding weight room injury is something that should have been emphasized more even in college. And endurance strength is much more translatable to wrestling anyway. Even for explosive lifts like power cleans-wrestling requires repeated explosive movements. 

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1 hour ago, Billyhoyle said:

This makes so much sense to me. You can still build muscle by endurance lifting. I used to max out when I competed, but as an older person, my #1 goal is to not get injured. In retrospect, avoiding weight room injury is something that should have been emphasized more even in college. And endurance strength is much more translatable to wrestling anyway. Even for explosive lifts like power cleans-wrestling requires repeated explosive movements. 

By max out, I take it he means a 1 rep max, biggest number you can put up. 

I just avoid it for convenience sake. I don't have a spotter. So for some lifts like bench, finding  a true max is annoying. Even if I don't get injured I don't feel  like dealing with getting stuck underneath the bar.

And anecdotally someone I know died recently while bench pressing alone, the bar got stuck on his neck and he didn't have the strength to move it off.

Its also not fun changing weights all the time. I'd rather keep the weight on the bar the same and just adjust the reps or artificially slow them down then constantly changing plates out to get that perfect weight  on there. 

You can also gage your strength pretty well by other lifts. If you can do 5 reps of x weight  at near failure, just plug that into a calculator and it will spit out a nice estimate of what your one rep max strength is.

 

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11 hours ago, Wrestleknownothing said:

Gable Steveson does not max out when weight lifting.

https://www.insider.com/gold-medalist-wrestler-uses-lighter-weights-doesnt-max-out-2021-12

It doesn't say that he stops at 12 ounce curls, but I am seeing if that works for me.

And who do we think he is talking about here?:

"There's really no point besides telling your friends that you lifted a certain amount," Stevenson told Insider. "Stuff like that is pointless and it could injure you."

So are we supposed to believe that he could do a double or triple backflip but views that as "pointless?  ;_;

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This is not really an earth shattering insight. Even powerlifters don't max out very often, because that is not what builds strength and muscle, working to failure does. So from a wrestling standpoint, a 1 rep max is not very beneficial and could cause injury (while it can be used in a strength training program to gauge what weights and reps you should be doing to make improvements, the number can also be estimated using a 1 rep max calculator as mentioned above). I would still be willing to bet that Gable lifts some pretty heavy weights, even if he doesn't feel the need to deadlift 700 lbs.

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6 hours ago, Crotalus said:

This is not really an earth shattering insight. Even powerlifters don't max out very often, because that is not what builds strength and muscle, working to failure does. So from a wrestling standpoint, a 1 rep max is not very beneficial and could cause injury (while it can be used in a strength training program to gauge what weights and reps you should be doing to make improvements, the number can also be estimated using a 1 rep max calculator as mentioned above). I would still be willing to bet that Gable lifts some pretty heavy weights, even if he doesn't feel the need to deadlift 700 lbs.

Yeah, I thought it was a really weird article. When I started high school 20 years ago our strength programs had moved past the 1 rep max stuff and there was plenty of evidence and consensus that it wasn't the way to go. 

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12 hours ago, Crotalus said:

This is not really an earth shattering insight. Even powerlifters don't max out very often, because that is not what builds strength and muscle, working to failure does. So from a wrestling standpoint, a 1 rep max is not very beneficial and could cause injury (while it can be used in a strength training program to gauge what weights and reps you should be doing to make improvements, the number can also be estimated using a 1 rep max calculator as mentioned above). I would still be willing to bet that Gable lifts some pretty heavy weights, even if he doesn't feel the need to deadlift 700 lbs.

Most of the best powerlifters never train to failure on the main lifts.  If you miss a rep, you generally did something wrong.

Edited by AHamilton

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I went through a phase a few years ago where I was trying to hit high one rep max on lifts and while I was lucky enough to not have a major injury there were times where I'd have a tweaked back or neck for two weeks. I also didn't make much progress in strength during that time. Right now I'm doing 2-3 sets of 4-6 reps on my heaviest exercises and it feels much safer and also like I'm making better progress.

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