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College Wrestler Dies from Heatstroke

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I have no issue conceding semantics on the word exonerate. My understanding was exonerated meant you are “absolved” of wrongdoing. Once you are found not guilty you are in fact absolved of that crime FOREVER. To me that fits. However, I am not going to die on this hill. 

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3 hours ago, MSU158 said:

Not really in this case.  Double jeopardy essentially does in fact exonerate him criminally. He cannot be tried again for those charges...

Edited to add:  I made sure to say exonerate criminally.  Because, you would be correct, if I just said exonerated.  Because, he still could be found guilty of wrongdoing and was civilly.  

Adding 'exonerate' to the list of words you don't understand.

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3 hours ago, MSU158 said:

I have no issue conceding semantics on the word exonerate. My understanding was exonerated meant you are “absolved” of wrongdoing. Once you are found not guilty you are in fact absolved of that crime FOREVER. To me that fits. However, I am not going to die on this hill. 

dictionary.com is your friend.

ProTip: It doesn't mean that.

Words mean things...

Edited by Mike Parrish

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7 hours ago, dman115 said:

You literally just said so in the freaking post right before the one you just posted....SMH...

Then you should have no problem quoting my post and proving me wrong. Chop chop.

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how about you show us all the "facts" you have that the people investigating the coaches didn't do their job because no criminal charges were filed....or do you not need to because in a completely unrelated sexual abuse case people may have in fact dropped the ball during that investigation...so essentially your stance is, because some people screwed up in the Nassar investigation (and they should be held accountable), every single investigation from that point forward can't be trusted??

Once again, you are trying to frame the conversation to try to force a burden of proof that doesn't exist.

I have to wonder why you're implicitly defending the kiddie diddlers and athlete murderers here.

 

Quote

Or how about your accusation that MSU is shutting down any discussion...please show me where he, or I have done that?

As above. Try sounding the words out. Maybe find someone nearby with a middle school reading level to help you work the dictionary.

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  Or when someone says they feel differently and can poke holes in your logic, or lack there of, that hurts your feelings and you accuse them of "shutting you down"?  Maybe take some deep breaths and try and read what MSU has written to try and truly understand what he is saying and why he has the stance he does (he says it WAY better than I do)??  You still may not agree, and that is totally fine, but maybe you won't try and accuse him of wanting to support a sexual predator, or he and I are the reason these evil people get away with it for so long.

It's what it looks like.

The many, many people around Nassar knew or should have known.
Five have been charged with felonies.
Civil lawsuits have succeeded and are ongoing.

The verdict for rational people is that the burden of proof of liability has been reached.

But you two do you two.

 

Just sayin', it doesn't make either one of you look good.

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11 hours ago, Mike Parrish said:

Adding 'exonerate' to the list of words you don't understand.

Seriously? I concede and this is the route you go?  To be clear, it may not be the most used way in legal proceedings, but by this literal definition, how was I wrong exactly? Would love to hear this detailed

 
 
 
ex·on·er·ate
/iɡˈzänəˌrāt/
 
verb
  1. 1. 
    (especially of an official body) absolve (someone) from blame for a fault or wrongdoing, especially after due consideration of the case.
    "they should exonerate these men from this crime"
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Similar:
    absolve
     
     
    clear
     
     
    acquit
     
     
    declare innocent
     
    find innocent
     
    pronounce not guilty
     
    discharge
     
     
    vindicate
     
     
    exculpate
     
     
     
    Opposite:
    charge
     
     
    convict
     
     
  2. 2. 
    release someone from (a duty or obligation).
     
    Hell even “pronounce not guilty” is used as an example…

 

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10 hours ago, Mike Parrish said:

Then you should have no problem quoting my post and proving me wrong. Chop chop.

Once again, you are trying to frame the conversation to try to force a burden of proof that doesn't exist.

I have to wonder why you're implicitly defending the kiddie diddlers and athlete murderers here.

 

As above. Try sounding the words out. Maybe find someone nearby with a middle school reading level to help you work the dictionary.

It's what it looks like.

The many, many people around Nassar knew or should have known.
Five have been charged with felonies.
Civil lawsuits have succeeded and are ongoing.

The verdict for rational people is that the burden of proof of liability has been reached.

But you two do you two.

 

Just sayin', it doesn't make either one of you look good.

Who is Col. Jessup in this scene?

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1 hour ago, MSU158 said:

Seriously? I concede and this is the route you go?  To be clear, it may not be the most used way in legal proceedings, but by this literal definition, how was I wrong exactly? Would love to hear this detailed

 
 
 
ex·on·er·ate
/iɡˈzänəˌrāt/
 
verb
  1. 1. 
    (especially of an official body) absolve (someone) from blame for a fault or wrongdoing, especially after due consideration of the case.
    "they should exonerate these men from this crime"
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Similar:
    absolve
     
     
    clear
     
     
    acquit
     
     
    declare innocent
     
    find innocent
     
    pronounce not guilty
     
    discharge
     
     
    vindicate
     
     
    exculpate
     
     
     
    Opposite:
    charge
     
     
    convict
     
     
  2. 2. 
    release someone from (a duty or obligation).
     
    Hell even “pronounce not guilty” is used as an example…

 

Apparently,  'concede' also needs to be added to the list of words you don't understand.

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21 minutes ago, HurricaneWrestling2 said:

Apparently,  'concede' also needs to be added to the list of words you don't understand.

Look, why would I? No point in sticking to it if I get blasted for doing so? Especially in a case where I didn’t use an antonym. I mean I used the word that a jd phd law professor just answered saying the words acquittal and exonerate are essentially commonly interchangeable the only difference is nuance. 
 

And I now get why no one on here will concede anything. I will add over the professors response when I get back to my laptop later today. 

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6 minutes ago, Plasmodium said:

Hmmmm. After doing my own research, conclusion is MSU158 can speak English.


Very astute observation and conclusion.

Edited by MSU158

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11 minutes ago, MSU158 said:

Look, why would I? No point in sticking to it if I get blasted for doing so? Especially in a case where I didn’t use an antonym. I mean I used the word that a jd phd law professor just answered saying the words acquittal and exonerate are essentially commonly interchangeable the only difference is nuance. 

Dig that hole.

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Oh, this is so painful. I feel reflected embarrassment when I read your posts.

Let me help here so we can end this debacle of compromised comprehension.

https://howtojustice.org/going-to-prison/what-exonerated-of-a-charge-means/

Quote

What Does It Mean to Be Exonerated Of a Criminal Charge?

A court can find you guilty or not guilty of a crime. But getting exonerated of a criminal charge is different. This means that the court has overturned your conviction and dismissed all of the charges against you based on new evidence. It means the court recognizes your innocence.

Is exoneration the same as an acquittal?

An exoneration and an acquittal have similar outcomes. But they are different concepts. An acquittal occurs when the court finds you “not guilty.” This doesn’t necessarily mean that you are innocent. It means you were charged with a crime but the jury or judge does not believe you are guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. In that case, they will find you “not guilty.” And you will be acquitted.

You get exonerated after a court has already found you guilty. When the court exonerates you, it dismisses all of the related charges against you. Unlike being found “not guilty,” it means the court has found you innocent.

How can you get exonerated?

There are several reasons that a court might exonerate you.

  • New evidence that proves your innocence. Sometimes new evidence can prove that you did not commit the crime that the court convicted you of. One common example is DNA evidence.
  • Another person confesses to a crime. If a person confesses to the crime that you were convicted of, the court may exonerate you.

 

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21 minutes ago, MSU158 said:

Look, why would I? No point in sticking to it if I get blasted for doing so? Especially in a case where I didn’t use an antonym. I mean I used the word that a jd phd law professor just answered saying the words acquittal and exonerate are essentially commonly interchangeable the only difference is nuance. 
 

And I now get why no one on here will concede anything. I will add over the professors response when I get back to my laptop later today. 

Why take the time to even consider the possibility of being wrong, uninformed, or bias on an issue? Let alone admit it? Asking for honest discussions, might be a bridge too far when victory is as simple as 'NUH-UH!' 

Also, if you and your friends kick that ball in my yard one more time.... 

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