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JohnnyThompsonnum1

How to handle loss

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From 2002.

 

He was a three time All American having finished 5th two years in a row and then 3rd the year before. As a #2 seed, he had just gotten off a high of winning his first BIG 10 title. Leroy Vega was poised and ready to not only win his fourth AA award, but make his first NCAA finals appearance. Everything looked to be going according to plan when suddenly the unthinkable happened. Hofstra's Tom Noto who Vega had handled easily 11-1 earlier in the season, handed Vega a 4-2 sudden victory loss. His chances of ever making the finals were now over. He bounced back strong in his first consolation match sticking Stanford's Nathan Paulsen and looked to be in route to a third place finish. Yet in the third round consolation the score was 2-2 with the seconds winding down on the clock. His opponent Chris Rodrigues of North Carolina had riding time locked up. Vega needed to escape to put the match at 3-3 and send it into overtime. Yet as seconds ticked away, Vega didn't escape. Rodrigues won and Leroy Vega wasn't going to be a four time All American. He understandably stood with tears running down his face as he shook Rodrigues's hand and jogged back out of sight. It was hard to know what type of reaction Vega was going to have for the rest of the tournament. Here he was the #2 seed, and now one of the biggest talks of the tournament as anyone who followed wrestling even remotely, was in shock that he would not place a fourth time.

 

Yet it wasn't much longer when Vega was seen again, and this time in support of his teammate, his friend Chad Erickson. Shouting advice and coaching him from a distance. Before the R12 matches, where Erickson would have to face Phil Simpson of the Army, Vega was out on the mat drilling moves with Erickson and talking strategy. With only seconds left on the clock and down 3-2, Vega yelling at Erickson from the corner, cheering him on, Erickson scored at the last possible opportunity and won his second AA award with a stunning 4-3 victory. One of the first people there to congratulate Erickson on his win? His teammate and his friend, Leroy Vega.

 

There are many ways to handle a loss, that's one of them.

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Any of the following are appropriate ways to handle a loss:

 

A. Go back to the hotel, pack your bags, high-tail it out of town

 

B. Be seen waiting in the snack line, or better yet eating nachos up in the bleachers, as they announce final call for you to show up to your consolation round match

 

C. Immediately after the loss, remain sprawled out on the mat in an obviously over-dramatic gesture and refuse to get up (the way international wrestlers dramatize being upset at losing)

 

D. Shake your opponents hand and calmly stroll off the mat without a care no matter how big the upset (also known as the Lambrecht/Foster method)

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in the spirit of DF, I'll ignore the attempt at poignancy that started this thread.

 

My all-time favorite reaction to losing went like this:

I had a kid who was a great wrestler - but he was a 14 year old wrestling a high school middle weight - something like 138. He had an injured knee and he hadn't yet entered puberty. Reaching the sectional finals, he was faced with wrestling a 19 year old senior who had been 3rd in the state the previous year. He went to a school for troubled youth that was the perennial state weight lifting champs. The kid was built like a god and I have no idea how these two could have been the same weight class. To top it off, the kid had pinned every opponent through the year and into the finals of sectionals.

 

It was a David vs. Goliath scenario and when they shook hands I wanted to throw in the towel before it started. I thought my kid was going to be physically hurt. The match didn't go as most people anticipated.

 

Our kid calmly took the monster down and threw in the boots. The next 6 minutes that kid got a wrestling lesson he'll never forget - nor will anyone who saw the bout.

 

The clock ran down to end the third, with my kid having ridden this behemoth for about 5 1/2 minutes. The final score was, I think, 7-0.

 

Here's the good part. The buzzer sounded, our kid calmly stood up - not even breathing heavily. The monster laid on the mat and started beating the mat with his fists and kicking. He looked like a giant sized two year old who had his lollipop taken away from him.

 

Great moments in wrestling.

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in the spirit of DF, I'll ignore the attempt at poignancy that started this thread.

 

My all-time favorite reaction to losing went like this:

I had a kid who was a great wrestler - but he was a 14 year old wrestling a high school middle weight - something like 138. He had an injured knee and he hadn't yet entered puberty. Reaching the sectional finals, he was faced with wrestling a 19 year old senior who had been 3rd in the state the previous year. He went to a school for troubled youth that was the perennial state weight lifting champs. The kid was built like a god and I have no idea how these two could have been the same weight class. To top it off, the kid had pinned every opponent through the year and into the finals of sectionals.

 

It was a David vs. Goliath scenario and when they shook hands I wanted to throw in the towel before it started. I thought my kid was going to be physically hurt. The match didn't go as most people anticipated.

 

Our kid calmly took the monster down and threw in the boots. The next 6 minutes that kid got a wrestling lesson he'll never forget - nor will anyone who saw the bout.

 

The clock ran down to end the third, with my kid having ridden this behemoth for about 5 1/2 minutes. The final score was, I think, 7-0.

 

Here's the good part. The buzzer sounded, our kid calmly stood up - not even breathing heavily. The monster laid on the mat and started beating the mat with his fists and kicking. He looked like a giant sized two year old who had his lollipop taken away from him.

 

Great moments in wrestling.

 

Admit it, you just took the final match from Vision Quest and changed it so your guy rode out Shute instead of hip tossing him.

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There you have it. Possibly the two biggest egos on the forum going head to head.

 

And we get to witness it on the evening of the final episode if Breaking Bad.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free

 

Head to head? What? I like DF. I enjoy his post and get a kick out of the guy. And seriously, I'm going for the gold in ego? Here? Are you kidding me? I wouldn't even qualify with all of the many outstanding candidates that we have here on themat.com. I wouldn't even qualify. Now you on the other hand, take your medal bucko. Top 8 for sure. Take your medal and stand with pride amigo, you've earned it.

 

 

 

 

DF - D is the best option in my opinion.

 

 

Olddirty - I can imagine if Guinness had a world record for times where a person has acted unsportsmanlike you'd at least be in contention.

 

 

 

IF it was from vision quest the guy is down by 4 points, and the coach tells him that he has to pin him in order to win, even though a 5 point move would win the match as well.

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2010 NJ Finals Scott Festejo Long Branch over Mike Morales Brick 7-6

 

Morales had won the year before with Festejo 3rd.

Some close calls. Video only shows towards the end and after.

Festejo runs to his father on sideline. Comes back to Morales for the handshake (they are friends). Morales calmly takes care of business at the center, walks over to the LB coaches and then walks over to Festejo's father for his own hug.

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Anyone wanna take a stab at telling another story of how a guy actually handled loss in a respectable, admirable and honorable way. Or has the messageboard gotten so overran with bitterness and negativity that the best I can expect is a farce of a response from DF?

 

You always root for the nerdy underdog to get the girl in all of those romantic comedies dont you?

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A little over 20 years ago there was a state semi-final bout between two absolute studs, one from Erie, one from the Philly area. It was a tremendous barn-burner that the Erie kid won in OT, something like 10-9.

 

Fast forward one year. Both are again in the same weight class, both are undefeated. But this time they meet in the state finals. The match started and almost immediately (within 20-30 seconds) the Erie kid is hurt - maybe a dislocated shoulder, something like that - and has to forfeit.

 

I happened to be sitting up in the nose-bleed seats one row in front of the Philly-area kid's parents. A few minutes later both wrestlers appeared behind me to sit with the parents. Both were hugging each other and crying.

 

They had a great rivalry but were obviously very close friends. Both were disappointed that they couldn't finish it on the mat. The winner was as upset as the loser. But it didn't affect their friendship.

 

Here's an odd addendum -- the two met in wrestle-backs in the NCAA championships a few years later. The Philly kid won 7-6. The weight class had at least 4 PA state champs and was won by Cary Kolat.

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Anyone wanna take a stab at telling another story of how a guy actually handled loss in a respectable, admirable and honorable way. Or has the messageboard gotten so overran with bitterness and negativity that the best I can expect is a farce of a response from DF?

 

You always root for the nerdy underdog to get the girl in all of those romantic comedies dont you?

 

Oh I don't know, just in "Pretty in Pink" and "Can't buy me Love" The modern day romantic comedies just don't do it for me.

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A few minutes later both wrestlers appeared behind me to sit with the parents. Both were hugging each other and crying.

 

They had a great rivalry but were obviously very close friends. Both were disappointed that they couldn't finish it on the mat. The winner was as upset as the loser. But it didn't affect their friendship.

 

Yeah right. The guy just won state and you bought into his Academy Award winning performance of pretending to be upset so as to not make his friend feel as bad.

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From 2002.

 

He was a three time All American having finished 5th two years in a row and then 3rd the year before. As a #2 seed, he had just gotten off a high of winning his first BIG 10 title. Leroy Vega was poised and ready to not only win his fourth AA award, but make his first NCAA finals appearance. Everything looked to be going according to plan when suddenly the unthinkable happened. Hofstra's Tom Noto who Vega had handled easily 11-1 earlier in the season, handed Vega a 4-2 sudden victory loss. His chances of ever making the finals were now over. He bounced back strong in his first consolation match sticking Stanford's Nathan Paulsen and looked to be in route to a third place finish. Yet in the third round consolation the score was 2-2 with the seconds winding down on the clock. His opponent Chris Rodrigues of North Carolina had riding time locked up. Vega needed to escape to put the match at 3-3 and send it into overtime. Yet as seconds ticked away, Vega didn't escape. Rodrigues won and Leroy Vega wasn't going to be a four time All American. He understandably stood with tears running down his face as he shook Rodrigues's hand and jogged back out of sight. It was hard to know what type of reaction Vega was going to have for the rest of the tournament. Here he was the #2 seed, and now one of the biggest talks of the tournament as anyone who followed wrestling even remotely, was in shock that he would not place a fourth time.

 

Yet it wasn't much longer when Vega was seen again, and this time in support of his teammate, his friend Chad Erickson. Shouting advice and coaching him from a distance. Before the R12 matches, where Erickson would have to face Phil Simpson of the Army, Vega was out on the mat drilling moves with Erickson and talking strategy. With only seconds left on the clock and down 3-2, Vega yelling at Erickson from the corner, cheering him on, Erickson scored at the last possible opportunity and won his second AA award with a stunning 4-3 victory. One of the first people there to congratulate Erickson on his win? His teammate and his friend, Leroy Vega.

 

There are many ways to handle a loss, that's one of them.

 

+1

 

Nice offerings from gimpeltf and oldcougar, too.

 

For me, it was the end of this match: (I was in the crowd.)

 

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I'm surprised no one mentioned the exchange between McDonough and Megaludis. I find it very noble on Matt's part that after he had just lost his last AA spot, given his legacy, he could wish well upon a rival of his. That's what wrestling is about.

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I always think of this discussion when I think of how to handle a loss.

 

http://www.usawrestlingnation.com/phpBB ... f=12&t=370

 

Controversy broke out in the Division I 135-pound championship match. When the match ended, Section One senior C.J. Rodriguez was beating Section Two’s Paul Fiorio, 7-6.

 

That’s when things got hectic.

 

Rodriguez threw his headgear in the air in celebration before shaking hands, which is a rules violation.

 

After a discussion that lasted about 10 minutes, the two referees involved in the match hit Rodriguez with an unsportsmanlike penalty. Because Rodriguez had already had two stalling calls, the third violation became a two-point penalty. That gave the match — and the state championship — to Fiorio, 8-7.

 

Section One had a strong contingent in the crowd and a chorus of booing echoed through the arena. When Rodriguez was introduced as the second-place wrestler during the awards ceremony, he was greeted with a loud ovation and chants of "C.J. ... C.J. ..."

 

NOTE: if you read the article in the thread there are a lot of interesting names.

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There you have it. Possibly the two biggest egos on the forum going head to head.

 

And we get to witness it on the evening of the final episode if Breaking Bad.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free

 

Not following you on this one. DF, and especially JT1, being the biggest egos on this forum? :?:

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I would hope that the vast majority of wrestlers handle losses with dignity and sportsmanship. From what I've seen, most losing wrestlers are either pretty stoic or show their frustration in a relatively low key manner (laying on the mat for a few seconds, muttering to selves, not shaking hands, etc).

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